Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – NOVEMBER 2022

ADULT FICTION

“Hester” by Laurie Lico Albanese — “”This thoughtfully researched tale shines a light on the barriers faced by 19th-century women who did not conform.” ––Washington Post

“Secluded Cabin Sleeps Six” by Lisa Unger — “Embedded in a riveting novel of suspense is a revealing examination of the dangers inherent in public DNA sharing…[Lisa Unger] is in good form here, in her twentieth outing, and her fans will be eager to dive right in.” —Booklist

“The Inn at Tansy Falls” by Cate Woods — “A heartfelt contemporary about life, loss, and love that will utterly charm and delight readers and leave them clamoring for a follow-up.”―Booklist, Starred Review

“The Last Chairlift” by John Irving — “Here the consistent pleasure is an extended family whose distinctive voices deliver thoughtful messages of tolerance, understanding, and affection for those who are different.”—KIRKUS REVIEWS

“The Passenger” by Cormac McCarthy — “A rich story of an underachieving salvage diver in 1980 New Orleans… This thriller narrative is intertwined with the story of Western’s sister, Alicia… He dazzles with his descriptions of a beautifully broken New Orleans… The book’s many pleasures will leave readers aching for the final installment.”  —Publishers Weekly

“The Perfect Assassin” by James Patterson — “Grandson of action hero Doc Savage, nerdy professor Brandt Savage is pressed into a top-secret training program that re-creates him mentally and physically as The Perfect Assassin…” — LIBRARY JOURNAL, c2022.

ADULT MYSTERY

“The Butcher and the Wren” by Alaina Urquhart — ‘Urquhart has crafted a thriller that is necessarily graphic but not exploitative. The crisp detail, the narrative brevity and the blade-sharp connections between the pathologist and the killer all bode well for future installments.” —Sarah Weinman, New York Times

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“A Place Called Home” by David Ambroz — “[A] captivating debut…Galvanizing and compassionate, this personal account of survival should be required reading.”―Publishers Weekly

“Being Heumann: An Unrepentant Memoir of Disability Rights Activist” by Judith Heumann with Kristen Joiner — “Consider this book an inspiring call for inclusiveness, courage, equity, and justice as well as a reminder of people’s power to change the world for the better.” —Booklist

“Dying of Politeness” by Geena Davis — “Academy Award winner Davis makes an engaging literary debut with a candid, appealing memoir recounting her evolution from self-effacing young woman to feisty activist … An entertaining and ebullient memoir.” — Kirkus Reviews

“Invisible Storm: A Soldier’s Memoir of Politics and PTSD” by Jason Kander– “Kander displays a level of vulnerability not often seen in political memoirs, offering a bracing portrait of untreated PTSD and an insightful psychological profile of political ambition. Readers will appreciate the candor of this harrowing tale.” — Publishers Weekly

“Path Lit by Lightning: A Life by Jim Thorpe” by David Maraniss — “In the new biography Path Lit by Lightning, David Maraniss details the enormous odds that a Native American hero had to overcome. . . . He insists that taken as a whole, Jim Thorpe’s story is not one of prejudice, nor the hypocrisy of others. . . . [And] emphasizes that whatever life took from him, Thorpe persisted and trained and worked and learned and succeeded.” — Keith Olbermann ― The New York Times Book Review

“Somewhere Sisters: A Story of Adoption, Identity, and the Meaning of Family” by Erika Hayaskaki — “Hayasaki explores the many dimensions of transracial and transnational adoption in this moving account of families torn apart.”  ―The Cut

“Stay True” by Hua Hsu — “A moving portrait of friends, death, doubt, and everything in between. . . Hsu writes with tenderness but scorching precision. . . Genuinely one of the most moving portraits of friendship to have come out in recent years.” —The Nation

“Uncertain Fruit: A Memoir of Infertility, Loss and Love” by Rebecca and Sallyann Majoya — “A candid, unflinching look at a couple’s struggle to have a child of their own…By taking turns telling their story, moving back and forth in time and place, they have produced a skillfully woven narrative.” — Linda Peavy, poet and co-author of Frontier House

ADULT NON-FICTION

“A Girlhood: Letter to my Transgender Daughter” by Carolyn Hayes — “Hays here presents a different view of God—as a being of pure love that would never consider her daughter a mistake, but instead, a gift.”—Oprah Daily

“Art of Knitting Hats: 30 Easy-to-Follow Patterns to Create Your Own Colorwork Masterpiece” by Courtney Flynn — “This is a knitter’s dream introduction to colorwork! The designs in this book are whimsical, fun and sure to keep any knitter engaged from start to finish.” – Tif Neilan, creator of Tif Handknits

“Best Bike Rides in New England: Backroad Routes for Cycling the Northeast States” by David Sobel — “The Northeast provides some of the most exciting cycling in the United States: sweeping vistas, seaside towns, fall colors, and more. With this comprehensive guide, New Hampshire local David Sobel offers up rides in Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Maine.” — Amazon.com

“Ejaculate Responsibly: A Whole New Way to Think About Abortion” by Gabrielle Stanley Blair

“Forever Home: How We Turned our House Into a Haven for Abandoned, Abused and Misunderstood Dogs and Each Other” by Ron Danta — “… unforgettable, gut-wrenching story of how authors Robertshaw and Danta opened their hearts, homes, lives, and wallets to rescue over 13,000 dogs…. These two angels disguised as humans offer so much hope and love for animals—and invaluable lessons for readers.” — Booklist (starred review)

“Glucose Revolution: The Life Changing Power of Balancing Your Blood Sugar” by Jessie Inchauspe — “I hugely enjoyed reading this book; Jessie offers a detailed understanding of the problem which faces so many of us – how to balance our blood sugar levels – along with simple and accessible science-based hacks which really could help you transform your health.” —MICHAEL MOSLEY, M.D.,  #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Fast Diet

“No Choice: The Destruction of Roe V. Wade and the Fight to Protect a Fundamental American Right” by Becca Andrews — “Necessary in its racial and gender inclusivity, this thoughtful book will appeal to anyone looking to understand the way forward in a post-Roe world…An important book on a timely topic.”―Kirkus

“Playing God in the Meadow: How I Learned to Admire My Weeds” by Martha Leb Molnar — “A thoughtful tale of making a meadow, from a gardener who is not afraid to struggle with questions botanical and environmental.”―Sydney Landon Plum, author of Solitary Goose

“Smitten Kitchen Keepers: New Classics for Your Forever Files” by Deb Perelman — “Smitten Kitchen is not just a food blog: it is the food blog.” —The New Yorker

“Space Craze: America’s Enduring Fascination with Real and Imagined Spaceflight” by Margaret A. Weitekamp — “Weitekamp has produced an important book on the first great pillar of space travel: science fiction and the power of imagination. In a readable yet detailed manner, Weitekamp cleverly employs museum artifacts to reveal the ways objects capture elements of national identity and confirms once again that modern space travel is as much about the past as about the future.”—Howard McCurdy, author of Space and the American Imagination

“The Complete Modern Pantry: 350+ Ways to Cook Well with What’s on Hand” — “Flexibility is at the core of pantry cooking—when every cook needs to improvise. This unique guidehelps you get the most out of your own pantry by showing how ingredients add crunch, acid, umami, or spice to a dish.” — Amazon.com

“The Extraordinary Life of an Ordinary” by Paul Newman — “Raw reflections from a movie icon…a revealing memoir of a life marked by pain, grief, and regret…Intimate reflections on an extraordinary life steeped in sadness.” —Kirkus Reviews

“The Sleep Prescription: Seven Days to Unlocking Your Best Rest” by Aric A. Prather, PhD — “The Sleep Prescription is a practical guide to improving your sleep and enhancing your life. Prather offers a set of transfor­mative and doable changes in sleep habits that can make you healthier, happier, and more productive.” —Tom Boyce, MD, author of The Orchid and the Dandelion

“Wind Trees” by John Freeman — “With this collection, Freeman compels us to feel, in turns of turbulence and stillness, the longing and rage and wonder that visit anyone keenly and tenderly paying attention to the passage of human life in an uncertain landscape and time. Freeman’s poems become all at once like eulogy, like instruction, like acts of love.” —Pitchaya Sudbanthad

PICTURE BOOK

“Berry Song” by Michaela Goade
“Keepunumuk: Weeachumun’s Thanksgiving Story” by Danielle Greendeer, Anthony Perry and Alexis Bunt
“Kimchi, Kimchi Every Day” by Erica Kim
“More than Peach” by Bellen Woodard

JUVENILE BIOGRAPHY

“Finding My Dance” by Ria Thundercloud — “A moving picture book about the resilience one can find in one’s cultural inheritance.” —Kirkus Reviews

“The Eagle Huntress: The True Story of the Girl who Soared Beyond Expectations” by Aisholpan Nurgaiv with Liz Welsh — “Nurgaiv’s love for and pride in her homeland, culture, and family come through with quiet, persuasive power. An intriguing memoir from a girl who’s become a cultural icon.”―Kirkus

“The Vast Wonder of the World” by Melina Mangal — “Ernest Everett Just was not like other scientists of his time. He saw the whole, where others saw only parts. He noticed details others failed to see. He persisted in his research despite the discrimination and limitations imposed on him as an African American. …” —ONIX Annotations

JUVENILE FICTION

“Hear Me” by Kerry O’Malley Cerra — “Asterisks replace unheard words of dialogue in this moving middle grade novel, based on the author’s own life, that follows an adolescent girl’s struggle with both progressive hearing loss and her parents’ insistence that she get cochlear implants.”―The New York Times Book Review

YOUNG ADULT FICTION

“A Girl’s Guide to Love & Magic” by Debbie Rigaud — “Rigaud explores many elements of Haitian and Afro-Caribbean culture thoughtfully and with an admirable vulnerability as Cicely adventures down Eastern Parkway navigating stigma and magic, devils and allies, family legacies and shame en route to a rich, magical sort of self-discovery. Steeped in the magic of first kisses, family bonds, and joyful community.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“How Moon Fuentez Fell in Love with the Universe”by Raquel Vasquez Gilliland — “Amazingly realistic, this book is the coming-of-age story that teens need, wrapped in a gorgeously poetic package” — Booklist starred review

“Lakelore” by Anna-Maria McLemore — “An astonishingly beautiful love letter to neurodivergent and nonbinary teens cast amid a magical lake setting that will pull you in right along with the characters.” ―Booklist, starred review

“List of Ten” by Halli Gomez — “Told in the first person, this powerful novel takes readers into the emotional and physical depths of TS, feeling every pain and twitch. . . .This #OwnVoices novel gives insight into living with these conditions, and readers will ponder how friendship means more than being “perfect.”—School Library Journal

“Love from A to Z” by S. K. Ali — “In Love from A to Z, S.K. Ali once again takes an unflinching and moving look at the intricacies of life as a Muslim teen in an imperfect, multi-cultural world. Beautiful.” ― Shelf Awareness, starred review

“Meet Me in Mumbai” by Sabina Kahn — “Thought-provoking . . . compassionate . . . hopeful.” – Publishers Weekly

“Patron Saints of Nothing” by Randy Ribay — “Passionately and fearlessly, Ribay delves into matters of justice, grief, and identity.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

“The Life and Crimes of Hoodie Rosen” by Isaac Blum — “A sharply written coming-of-age story whose protagonist, like any teen, is figuring out where he fits in, under circumstances that are thought-provoking and at times heart-wrenching.” –Horn Book Magazine, *STARRED REVIEW*

“The Words in my Hands” by Asphyxia — “Part coming of age, part call to action, this fast-paced #ownvoices novel about a Deaf teenager is a unique and inspiring exploration of what it means to belong.” — Amazon.com

“TJ Powar has Something to Prove” by Jesmeen Kaur Deo — “In [a] poignant debut…Deo delivers a refreshing take on the familiar self-love narrative, portraying characters across the Indian diaspora whose determination to be themselves, irrespective of Western cultural perspectives, drives home the idea that the perception of oneself through a singular lens is often incomplete.”–Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Where Angels Pass” by Ellen Gable — “Ellen Gable tells a very personal and difficult story, Where Angels Pass, with such gentleness, love, and heartfelt honesty. What I expected to be an uncomfortable story ended up being a love story of a daughter for her father, a father who suffered the lifelong effects of something no young person should ever experience. Thank you, Ellen, for sharing this deeply moving story that will surely touch readers in a very profound way.” — Jim Sano, author, The Father’s Son

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2022

ADULT FICTION

“Book of Extraordinary Tragedies” by Joe Meno — “[A] richly embroidered coming-of-age story . . . An uplifting and interesting exploration of one family’s struggle for existence in the United States, against the backdrop of history, classical and popular music, and the financial crisis of 2007–08; highly recommended.” —Library Journal, starred review

“Eversion” by Alastair Reynolds — “[An] utterly brilliant exploration of life, death, and consciousness … It’s his most ambitious, certainly, and at the very least, one of his best. Required reading for SF fans.”―Booklist

“Fairy Tale” by Stephen King — “A page-turner driven by memorably strange encounters and well-rendered, often thrilling action.”
The New York Times Book Review 

“Has Anyone Seen My Toes” by Christopher Buckley — “This is Buckley at his comic, mischievous best…Buckley delights in exploring the intersections of plausible and absurd as they arise in an off-kilter mind that resembles the author’s for all its allusive gymnastics and silliness.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Last of the Seven: A Novel of World War II” by Steven Hartov — “A fact-inspired novel about a German Jewish soldier fighting for the British as a member of two secret, all-Jewish commando units disguised as Nazis. … Hartov is at his best capturing the torturous physical tests his protagonist is put to. The desert scenes scorch the imagination; the bombing of a transport ship is horrific. … A little-known story enjoyably told.”—Kirkus Reviews

“Lucy by the Sea” by Elizabeth Strout — “No novelist working today has Strout’s extraordinary capacity for radical empathy, for seeing the essence of people beyond reductive categories, for uniting us without sentimentality. I didn’t just love Lucy by the Sea; I needed it. May droves of readers come to feel enlarged, comforted, and genuinely uplifted by Lucy’s story.”—The Boston Globe

“Lungfish” by Meghan Gillis — “A family lives illegally on a Maine island, barely surviving, while a father endures recovery; Gilliss imbues every page with the ache and uncertainty of trying to give a child small pockets of joy under near impossible circumstances. The story is told balletically, compulsively, in short spurts of image and sensation, while also managing to immerse the reader fully in the textures, tastes and sounds of the Maine coast.” —Lynn Steger Strong, Los Angeles Times

“Mad Honey” by Jodi Picoult — “Alternatingly heart-pounding and heartbreaking . . .This collaboration between two best-selling authors seamlessly weaves together Olivia and Lily’s journeys, creating a provocative exploration of the strength that love and acceptance require.”—The Washington Post

“Moth” by Melody Razak — “Gripping… Razak painstakingly paints a portrait of a family; their rituals, their private languages, their shared lives. This careful characterisation pays off, heartbreakingly, when the horrors of partition wreak havoc on small, happy lives” — The Times

“Our Missing Hearts” by Celeste Ng — “Utterly stupendous. Ng creates an exquisite story of unbreakable family bonds, lifesaving storytelling (and seemingly omniscient librarians!), brilliantly subversive art, and accidentally transformative activism. As lyrical as it is chilling, as astonishing as it is empathic, Our Missing Hearts arguably achieves literary perfection.” — Booklist (starred review)

“Shrines of Gaiety” by Kate Atkinson — “[A] riveting re-creation of life in 1920s London…Atkinson’s palpable fondness for her characters helps her to imbue even themost minor of them with texture and depth, and she brings the same attention to detail to her portrait of the highs and lows of Jazz Age London. Another triumph from one of our finest novelists.”
Booklist (starred review)

“The Marriage Portrait” by Maggie O’Farrell — “O’Farrell intelligently connects Lucrezia’s trapped circumstances with the art that her husband, a notable patron and collector, commissions to immortalize her . . . There is a blinding power to the heightened, almost fetishistic beauty of Renaissance art, this novel suggests as it portrays a world of far greater brutality and fierceness.” —Wall Street Journal

“The Winners” by Fredrik Backman — “Backman leaves no emotion unturned, sweeping up the reader in riveting family dramas that jump the boundaries of hockey-town rivalries. Another winner.” —Library Journal (starred review)

“Village Idiot” by Steve Stern — “In an act of resounding creative alchemy, audaciously imaginative Stern combines his fascination with Jewish folktales and mysticism with the life and work of painter Chaim Soutine, forging saturated, gleaming, and tumultuous prose that captures the vision and vehemence of Soutine’s thickly textured, writhing, nearly hallucinatory paintings….Stern’s kinetically inventive and insightful homage is incandescent, riveting, and revelatory in its wrestling with the mysteries of creativity and the scourge of antisemitism.” — Booklist, STARRED REVIEW

ADULT MYSTERY

“Girl, Forgotten” by Karin Slaughter — “Slaughter skillfully leads readers on a thrilling journey into the past to solve the murder that a small town wants to forget, yet is still haunted by.”  — Library Journal (starred review)

“`Long Shadows” by David Baldacci — “The plot gets complex, with suspects galore. But the interpersonal dynamic between Decker and White is just as interesting as the solution to the murders, which doesn’t come easily . . . The pair will make a great series duo, especially if a bit of that initial tension between them returns . . . Fascinating main characters and a clever plot add up to an exciting read.”―Kirkus Reviews

“Treasure State” by C. J. Box — “[A] fast-paced mystery that pits betrayal, anger, and hate against hope and longing as it examines the lasting effect of a community used and abandoned after making a fortune for the titans of the copper mining industry.” ―Library Journal

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“Acceptance: A Memoir” by Emi Nietfeld — “A luminous, generation-defining memoir of foster care and homelessness, Harvard and Big Tech, examining society’s fixation with resilience—and its cost” — Publisher Annotation

“Dinners with Ruth: A Memoir on the Power of Friendships” by Nina Totenberg — “A genial, likable tone. Totenberg’s stories are lively but never go on too long; she appears to reflexively turn the reader’s attention to the generosity or small kindnesses of others. She writes, without pretension or self-congratulation, about moments of journalistic triumph of which she has every right to be proud…Her final display of friendship in this book entails laying bare just how frail Ginsburg truly was — and how extraordinary she was to persevere and inspire for as long as she did.” – The New York Times Book Review 

“The Daughters of Auschwitz: My Story of Resilience and Hope” by Tova Friedman — “This is the real thing, the horrors of the Holocaust brought shudderingly to life, and all from the point of view of a small child who could barely read or recognize numbers… It is an angry book, but it is also required reading.”—The Jewish Chronicle

“The Man Who Could Move Clouds” by Ingrid Rojas Contreras — “Rojas Contreras reacquaints herself with her family’s past, weaving their stories with personal narrative, unraveling legacies of violence, machismo and colonialism…In the process, she has written a spellbinding and genre-defying ancestral history.”—New York Times Book Review

ADULT NON-FICTION

“Africa is not a Country” Notes on a Bright Continent” by Dipo Faloyin — “With clarity and incisive wit, journalist Faloyin explores the origins of the 54 countries of Africa…Africa Is Not a Country [is] a forceful rebuttal of erased histories and simplified imagery as well as a celebration of a continent already living its dynamic future.” ― Booklist (starred review)

“Boards and Spreads: Shareable, Simple Arrangements for Every Meal” by Yasmin Fahr — “Whether hosting a dinner party or a sleepover, readers will find fun recipes and eye-pleasing, and crowd-pleasing, solutions for all their entertaining needs.”—Library Journal

“Breathless: The Scientific Race to Defeat a Deadly Virus” by David Quammen — “An authoritative new history of Covid-19 and its predecessors. . . . [Quammen] constructs a masterful account of viral evolution culminating in Covid-19. . . . Unsettling global health news brilliantly delivered by an expert.” ― Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“Pickleball for All: Everything but the “Kitchen” Sink” by Rachel Simon — “An entertaining and comprehensive look at America’s fastest growing sport, Pickleball for All is the ultimate primer for any level of player interested in the wacky history, unique rules, and exciting future of pickleball. ” — Amazon.com

“The Chaos Machine: The Inside Story of How Social Media Rewired our Mines and our World” by Max Fisher — “A Pulitzer Prize finalist, New York Times investigative reporter Fisher debuts with a critique of social networks, traveling worldwide to show that their rage for maximum engagement has radically restructured the world and led to extreme thought and, more crucially, extreme action. Homing in on pandemic, election, and insurrection; ” — Barbara Hoffert. LJ Prepub Alert Online Review. LIBRARY JOURNAL, c2022.

“The Mosquito Bowl: A Game of Life and Death in World War II” by Buzz Bissinger — “Bissinger effortlessly combines sports and military history in this gritty account of a football game played by U.S. Marines on Guadalcanal in December 1944 . . . . The book excels in its sweeping yet fine-grained portraits of how these Marines got to Guadalcanal and in the harrowing descriptions of Pacific Theater combat, including the bloody fight for Sugar Loaf Hill on Okinawa. This is a penetrating tale of courage and sacrifice.” — Publishers Weekly

“The Need to be Whole: Patriotism and the History of Prejudice” by David Quammen — “America’s greatest philosopher on sustainable life and living.” ―Chicago Tribune

“The Storm is Here: An American Crucible” by Luke Mogelson — “Indispensable . . . The great New Yorker battlefield reporter immerses himself with American militias you’ve only heard about, providing a firsthand account of those countrymen who are increasingly turning on their government. It reads like a first draft of the breakdown of American democracy.” —Chicago Tribune

PICTURE BOOK

“Opening Day Trouble: At the Great Vermont Corn Maze” by Mike Boudrea

EASY READER

“Wild Fliers!” by Martin and Chris Kraft

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Turner Family Stories: From Enslavement in Vermont” edited by Jane C. Beck & Andy Kolovos — “Turner Family Stories: From Enslavement in Virginia to Freedom in Vermont features the work of six New England cartoonists drawing on the rich personal and family stories of the remarkable Daisy Turner (1883-1988) of Grafton, Vermont.” — Amazon.com

JUVENILE NON-FICTION

“Your Yard is Nature: 10 Ways to Help Birds and Pollinators in Your Yard” by Leslie Nelson Inman

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

“Turner Family Stories: From Enslavement in Vermont” edited by Jane C. Beck & Andy Kolovos — “Turner Family Stories: From Enslavement in Virginia to Freedom in Vermont features the work of six New England cartoonists drawing on the rich personal and family stories of the remarkable Daisy Turner (1883-1988) of Grafton, Vermont.” — Amazon.com

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – JULY 2022

ADULT FICTION

“Hostage” by Clare Mackintosh — “Fiendishly clever. Mackintosh takes domestic suspense to new heights in this tale of a kidnapped child, hijacked plane, and two parents’ desperate fight to save their family.” ― Lisa Gardner, #1 New York Times bestselling author

“Life Sentences” by Billy O’Callaghan — “Billy O’Callaghan uses a trio of voices in his poignant novel Life Sentences as three generations of an Irish family probe a legacy of poverty and war. ….powerful.”
New York Times

“Montauk” by Nicola Harrison — “Glittering galas, lavish living, and the spoils of hedonism crash against the lush, wild, primitive beauty of an Atlantic Coastal fishing village, creating a perfect storm. Caught between the two worlds, one woman must discover who she truly is, even if it means losing everything in the process. Montauk is a stunning debut by a gifted storyteller.” – Erika Robuck, national bestselling author of Hemingway’s Girl

“The Bookshop of Second Chances” by Jackie Fraser — “Humor and charm abound. . . . [This] love story hits the spot.”—Publishers Weekly

“The Lamplighters” by Emma Stonex — “Superbly accomplished…The Lamplighters is a whodunnit, horror novel, ghost story and fantastically gripping psychological investigation rolled into one. It is also a pitch-perfect piece of writing.” —The Guardian (London)

“The Survivors” by Jane Harper — “As always, Harper skillfully evokes the landscape as she weaves a complicated, elegant web, full of long-buried secrets ready to come to light.” ―New York Times Book Review

ADULT MYSTERY

“Hatchet Island” by Paul Doiron — “Doiron paints a complex portrait of coastal Maine…Fans of C.J. Box’s Joe Pickett mysteries, which also star an indomitable game warden, will particularly enjoy this gripping tale.” —Bookpage

“The Bitterroots” by C. J. Box — “An appealing new heroine, a fast-moving plot, and a memorably nightmarish family make this one of Box’s ” ― Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

ADULT NON-FICTION

“Nala’s World: One Man, His Rescue Cat, and a Bike Ride around the Globe” by Dean Nicholson — “There are moments of tension, like when Nala can’t be found for a whole morning, and profundity . . . The writing is more like people you just met at a hostel telling you about their travels after a few pints. . . Nicholson is at his best when he tells the story of a man finding a sense of purpose from an unlikely (and adorable) source…charming.” ―New York Times Book Review

“Watching Darkness Fall: FDR, His Ambassadors, and the Rise of Adolf Hitler” by David McKean — “In new book Watching Darkness Fall, former US ambassador David McKean illustrates how antisemitism, apathy, and internal politics set America back in the war against Germany.” ―Times of Israel

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“A Life in Light: Meditations on Impermanence” by Mary Pipher — “For psychologist Pipher, the light found in nature, caring relationships, work, and books has always been the key to happiness. In this beautifully written memoir, her memories of childhood in Nebraska are vivid and poignant. . . . This lovely book teaches gentle lessons on gratitude and celebrating life.” ―Booklist, starred review

“Watching Darkness Fall: FDR, His Ambassadors, and the Rise of Adolf Hitler” by David McKean — “In new book Watching Darkness Fall, former US ambassador David McKean illustrates how antisemitism, apathy, and internal politics set America back in the war against Germany.” ―Times of Israel

PICTURE BOOK

“Better Than New: A Recycle Tale” by Robert Broder

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

Lore Olympus: Volume 2″ by Rachel Smythe — “Sensitive and elegant . . . Beautiful artwork and compelling characters [take] the forefront of this romantic, tech-savvy retelling of Greek mythology.”—Booklist

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – JUNE 2022

ADULT FICTION

” Bad Actors” by Mick Herron — “An outstanding mix of arch humor, superb characterizations, and trenchant political observations.”
Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

“Book Lovers” by Emily Henry — “[Book Lovers] is multilayered and the characters’ familial challenges are complex. By both playing to and overtly subverting romance tropes and archetypes like the high-powered big city woman who neglects her family and the life-affirming power of small-town life, this novel delivers an insightful comedic meditation on love, family and going your own way.”—NPR

“Five Tuesdays in Winter” by Lily King — “Lily King isn’t afraid of big emotional subjects: desire and grief, longing and love, growth and self-acceptance. But she eschews high drama for the immersive quiet of the everyday… Here we inhabit the worlds of authors and mothers, children and friends; we experience their lives in clear, graceful prose that swells with generous possibility. This is a book for writers and lovers, a book about storytelling itself, a book for all of us.”—Washington Post

“Girl in Ice” by Erica Ferencik — “Girl in Ice is a lot of things: a psychological suspense novel, a linguistic thriller and a scientific puzzle . . . Ferencik describes the Arctic topography with a poet’s awe, and some of her set-pieces—the procession of a huge herd of caribou, an Arctic dive gone badly awry—are breathtaking… A singular sensation.” —Wall Street Journal

“Harsh Times” by Mario Vargas Llosa — “[A] vivid story centered on the U.S.-backed 1954 coup in Guatemala . . . History here gets a compelling human face through an artist’s dramatic brilliance.” ―Kirkus Reviews (Starred Review)

“Honor” by Thrity Umrigar — “Umrigar excels in her juxtaposition of the contrasts between the tech hub image of contemporary India and the deep religious divisions that continue to wrack rural regions . . . This is a thought-provoking portrait of an India that ‘felt inexpressibly large—as well as small and provincial enough to choke.’” —Booklist

“Horse” by Geraldine Brooks — “With exceptional characterizations, Pulitzer Prize–winner Brooks tells an emotionally impactful tale . . . [The] settings are pitch-perfect, and the story brings to life the important roles filled by Black horsemen in America’s past. Brooks also showcases the magnificent beauty and competitive spirit of Lexington himself.” — Booklist (starred review)

“Lessons in Chemistry” by Bonnie Garmus — “In Garmus’s debut novel, a frustrated chemist finds herself at the helm of a cooking show that sparks a revolution. Welcome to the 1960s, where a woman’s arsenal of tools was often limited to the kitchen—and where Elizabeth Zott is hellbent on overturning the status quo one meal at a time.” —New York Times

“Minus Me” by Mameve Medwed — “Medwed’s lovely novel of marriage, motherhood, love and loss is so…A timely reminder that in the worst of times, we sometimes rediscover the very best of ourselves.”
Jodi Picoult, New York Times bestselling author of A Spark of Light

“Remarkably Bright Creatures” by Shelby Van Pelt — “Remarkably Bright Creatures [is] an ultimately feel-good but deceptively sensitive debut about what it feels like to have love taken from you, only to find it again in the most unexpected places. . . . Memorable and tender.” — Washington Post 

“Sea of Tranquility” by Emily St. John Mandel — “A time-travel puzzle… Mandel’s prose is beautiful but unfussy; some chapters are compressed into a few poetic lines. The story moves quickly… In the end, the novel’s interlocking plot resolves beautifully, making for a humane and moving time-travel story, as well as a meditation on loneliness and love.” —BookPage, starred

“Seven Steeples” by Sara Baume — “Seven Steeples is one of the most beautiful novels I have ever read….Baume’s descriptions of landscape are lovelier than I can express; you simply have to read them yourself.” — New York Times Book Review

“Sparring Partners” by John Grisham — “Jake Brigance is called upon to help his old friend, disgraced former attorney Mack Stafford, make his return; young death row inmate Cody Wallace has one final request just several hours before execution; two young attorney brothers, Kirk and Rusty Malloy, look to Diantha Bradshaw to help save their once prosperous firm which they inherited from their father.” — Baker & Taylor

“Suspects” by Danielle Steel — “Theodora Morgan, fashion royalty and one of the most successful businesswomen in the world, forms an instant connection with a man who, unbeknownst to her, is a CIA agent sent to protect her from the very same people involved in the kidnapping of her husband and son, which ended in tragedy.” — Baker & Taylor

“Take My Hand” by Dolen Perkins-Valdez — “Perhaps the most notable of this book’s gifts are its deft packaging of history and its quiet nod—in the juxtaposition of timelines—to the reproductive oppression haunting Black women to this day. Like the most effective education, though, it feels that the information is streaming through the heart, awakening it and inspiring it to action.”—San Francisco Chronicle

“The Forgotten Life of Eva Gordon” by Linda MacKillop –“[A] touching debut. . . . MacKillop takes the pain of aging and regret and infuses it with soul and a touch of humor. This auspicious first outing tugs at the heartstrings.” ― Publishers Weekly

“The Island” by Adrian McKinty — “One of this summer’s best standalone thrillers.” ―The Boston Globe

“The Lioness” by Chris Bohjalian — “[A] devastatingly cunning suspense novel… Bohjalian does a superb job of judiciously rolling out information of how past transgressions may have led to the heart-stopping episodes of chaos and carnage as the shocking, twist-filled plot builds up to the revelation of ‘the real reasons for the safari nightmare.’ This brilliant whydunit is not to be missed.” —Publishers Weekly, starred 

“The Lunar Housewife” by Caroline Woods — “An elegant novel of political and cultural suspense. . . the Cold War intrigue it conjures is gripping, and Louise’s dilemmas and adventures will hold sympathetic readers in thrall.”
–The Wall Street Journal

“The Murder of Mr. Wickham” by Claudia Gray — “Had Jane Austen sat down to write a country house murder mystery, this is exactly the book she would have written. Devotees of Austen’s timeless novels will get the greatest possible pleasure from this wonderful book. Immense fun and beautifully observed. Delicious!” —Alexander McCall Smith

“The Paris Apartment” by Lucy Foley — “But it’s not only the intelligent and riveting storyline or the carefully conceived and fully developed characters that elevates this book far above mundane thrillers. Foley’s precise prose rings with echoes of her British background and the elegance of her French setting. … With confidence and cunning, Foley provides pleasures that chill as they captivate.” — Fredericksburg Free Lance-Star

“The Paris Bookseller” by Karri Maher — “Kerri Maher’s The Paris Bookseller is a worthy homage to Sylvia Beach and a love letter to all bookstores, libraries, and the passionate and committed women who run them.” —New York Journal of Books

“The Sweetness of Water” by Nathan Harris — “Deeply moving… Harris’s ambitious debut explores the aftermath of the Emancipation Proclamation in rural Georgia… Harris peoples the small community with well-developed characters… [He] writes in intelligent, down-to-earth prose and shows a keen understanding of his characters.”―Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“The Twilight World” by Werner Herzog — “From the true story of a WWII soldier who kept up the fight until 1974, legendary filmmaker Herzog distills a brooding, poetic novella . . . Herzog, ever in pursuit of deeper truths, sees in Onoda’s predicament an all-too-ordinary tendency to subordinate facts to master narratives. —Booklist

“The Viscount Who Loved Me” by Julia Quinn — “Quinn is . . . a romance master. [She] has created a family so likable and attractive, a community so vibrant and engaging, that we want to crawl into the pages and know them.”  — NPR Books

ADULT MYSTERY

“Dream Town” by David Baldacci — “Baldacci paints a vivid picture of the not-so-distant era . . . The 1950s weren’t the fabled good old days, but they’re fodder for gritty crime stories of high ideals and lowlifes, of longing and disappointment, and all the trouble a PI can handle. Well-done crime fiction. Baldacci nails the noir.”―Kirkus, Starred Review

“The Investigator” by John Sandford — “The Investigator is a procedural action thriller in which the technical sleuthing only heightens the tension. Letty is such a capable character, and Mr. Sandford such a fine tactician, it would seem incomprehensible and even cruel to deny readers a swift follow-up.”–Wall Street Journal 

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“Pathological: The True Story of Six Misdiagnoses” by Sarah Fay — “A] fiery manifesto of a memoir.” — New York Times Book Review

“His Name is George Floyd: One Man’s Life and the Struggle for Racial Justice” by Robert Samuels — “Writing with cogency and compassion, the authors free Floyd from the realm of iconography, restoring his humanity . . . A brilliant biography, history book, and searing indictment of this country’s ongoing failure to eradicate systemic racism.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review 

“Lost & Found: A Memoir” by Kathryn Schulz — “Deeply felt. More than a reflection on the loss of a parent. It is about the idea of loss in general and the passage of time. Fresh and evocative . . . a poignant, loving, wise, and comforting meditation on grief from both a personal and collective perspective.” —Booklist (starred review)

ADULT NON-FICTION

“Against All Odds: A True Story of Ultimate Courage and Survival in World War II” by Alex Kershaw — “Against All Odds achieves a pitch-perfect balance between a ground view of combat and the seismic forces that drew men like [Maurice] Britt and [Audie] Murphy to the killing grounds of Europe. Its prose is sharp, efficient and entertaining, its characters thoroughly human.”—The Wall Street Journal

“Atlas of the Heart: Mapping Meaningful Connections & the Language of Human Experience” by Brene Brown — “…Brown takes us on a journey through eighty-seven of the emotions and experiences that define what it means to be human. As she maps the necessary skills and an actionable framework for meaningful connection, she gives us the language and tools to access a universe of new choices and second chances—a universe where we can share and steward the stories of our bravest and most heartbreaking moments with one another in a way that builds connection.” — Random House, Inc.

“Embrace Fearlessly: The Burning World: Essays” by Barry Holstun Lopez — “Altogether, the pieces are honest and searching, engaging readers in the largest of questions: How do we live in the world? How do we see it? How do we protect it? . . . A sterling valediction. Lopez’s many followers will treasure this book.”—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“How the World Really Works: The Science Behind How We Got Here and Where We’re Going” by Vaclav Smil — “You can agree or disagree with Smil—accept or doubt his ‘just the facts’ posture—but you probably shouldn’t ignore him. . . In Smil’s provocative but perceptive view, unrealistic notions about carbon reduction are partly, and ironically, attributable to the very productivity that societies achieved by substituting machine work, powered by fossil fuels, for draft animals and human laborers.”—The Washington Post

“How to Tell a Story: The Essential Guide to Memorable Storytelling From the Moth” by Meg Bowles — “Inspiring . . . This book . . . provides everything readers need to share their own personal narratives.”—Booklist

“Lakes: Their Birth, Life, and Death” by John Richard Saylor — “Saylor delivers science in a layperson’s language to detail their forms, how they’re created, how they’re miraculously sustained, and, yes, how they die. Revelations abound.”—Booklist

“Last Call at the Hotel Imperial: The Reporters Who Took on a World at War” by Deborah Cohen — “In her engrossing account of this era and the people who did more than simply report facts, Cohen successfully interweaves international events with personal histories, creating a narrative that is well-crafted and comprehensively researched. . . . The resulting history is both unique and memorable. —Library Journal (starred review)

“Makhno: Ukrainian Freedom Fighter” by Philippe Thirault — “In early 20th century Ukraine, anarchist Nestor Makhno, the son of peasants, was among the most heroic and colorful figures of the Russian Revolution, encouraging his people to find and embrace social and economic self-determination. This is his story, of a military strategist who tirelessly defied both the Bolsheviks and the Germans to protect his homeland.” — Amazon.com

“On Task: How Our Brains Get Things Done” by David Badre –“On Task is a stimulating, enjoyable read for anyone interested in brain function, particularly if you want to understand how researchers are attempting to unravel some of the biggest mysteries of them all: how humans think, how they are successful when confronted with new challenges and how prefrontal cortex might contribute to that success.”—Masud Husain, Brain

“River of the Gods” by Candace Millard — “Millard’s research and very readable storytelling are admirable. . . Ultimately, the identity of the person who first discovered the source of the White Nile may be a trivial matter. Ms. Millard conscientiously investigates the issue, of course, but River of the Gods is compelling because she does justice to the psyches and behavior of Burton and Speke—keenly flawed but enthralling, sometimes marvelous people.” — Wall Street Journal

“Sidelined: How Women Manage & Mismanage Their Health” by Susan Salenger — “A well-written and empowering work about the challenges facing female patients.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Somewhere We are Human: Authentic Voices on Migration, Survival and New Beginnings” edited by Reyna Grande and Sonia Guinansaca — “Wide-ranging yet consistently affecting, these pieces offer a crucial and inspired survey of the immigrant experience in America.” — Publishers Weekly

“The Complete Guide to Food Allergies in Adults and Children” by Scott H. Sicherer — “An outstanding, comprehensive, easily understandable, and up-to-date resource for people with food allergies, as well as their parents and caregivers.” — Anna Nowak-Wegrzyn, MD, PhD, New York University Grossman School of Medicine

“The Flag, the Cross, and the Station Wagon: A Graying American Looks Back at his Suburban Boyhood and Wonders What the Hell Happened” by Bill McKibben — “Adept at factual storytelling and connecting the dots, earnest, caring, and funny, McKibben dovetails personal reckonings with an astute elucidation of our social justice and environmental crises, arguing wisely that facing the truth about our past is the only way forward to a more just and sustainable future.” ―Booklist, starred review

“The Greatest Polar Expedition of All Time: The Arctic Mission to the Epicenter of Climate Change” by Markus Rex — “This marvelous book brings us aboard a unique 21st-century Arctic expedition—science-driven, multi-national, unprecedented—as it sails into the epicenter of the worsening climate crisis. For anyone concerned about global warming—and that should be all of us —this book is essential reading. A contemporary classic!”
Ken McGoogan, author of Fatal Passage: The Story of John Rae, The Arctic Hero Time Forgot and Dead Reckoning: The Untold Story of the Northwest Passage

“The Insect Crisis: The Fall of the Tiny Empires That Run the World” by Oliver Milman — “In this well-researched, engagingly written, and refreshingly measured book, Oliver Milman reveals the profound and complex implications of insect decline. A necessary and timely wake-up call full of fascinating and often unexpected detail.” ― Hugh Raffles, author of Insectopedia

“The Last Days of the Dinosaurs: An Asteroid, Extinction, and the Beginning of the World” by Riley Black — “A real-life, natural history page-turning drama that is necessary reading for almost anyone interested in the history of life.” ―Library Journal, starred review

“The Savory Baker: 150 Creative Recipes, From Classic to Modern” by America’s Test Kitchen — “Baking is about a lot more than just desserts. This unique collection, one of the few to focus solely on the savory side of baking, explores a multitude of flavor possibilities. Get inspired by creative twists like gochujang-filled puff pastry pinwheels or feta-studded dill-zucchini bread. And sample traditional baked goods from around the world, from Chinese lop cheung bao to Brazilian pão de quejo.” — Annotation

“The Woodchuck Travels through the Garden Seasons” by Ron Krupp — “This seasoned Vermont gardener ….groups topics and plants through the seasons, interspersed with his brand of humor and art and quotes he has found relevant and inspiring. If you’re a gardener in the Green Mountain State, or similar climate, you’re bound to pick up some tips or different views on diverse topics from composting to climate change, from pesticides to poetry to publications to pollinators.” — Dr. Leonard Payne Perry – Horticulture Professor Emeritus, University of Vermont

“Unmasking Autism: Discovering the New Faces of Neurodiversity” by Devon Price — “Price’s accessible and compassionate writing shines, and readers will feel encouraged to embrace a new understanding of themselves. Its potential to help masked autistic adults, especially those from systemically marginalized backgrounds, makes this book essential for most collections.”—Library Journal (starred review)

“Vermont Heritage: Essays on the Green Mountain History, 1770-1920” by H. Nicholas Muller III and J. Kevin Graffagnino — “It includes essays on Vermont historiography, Ethan and Ira Allen, early Vermont printing, eighteenth-century Vermont politics, the War of 1812, Vermont’s reaction to the 1837–38 Patriote Rebellion, and aspects of Victorian Vermont. The authors offer reminiscences and reflections on their lengthy Vermont careers in a joint Introduction.” — Vermont Research Books

“Write for Your Life” by Anne Quindlen — The #1 New York Times best-selling novelist and author of A Short Guide to a Happy Life, using examples past, present and future, shows how writing connects us, to ourselves and those we cherish—and issues a clarion call to pick up the pen, and find yourself.” — Atlas Publishing

“You Don’t Know Us Negroes: And Other Essays” by Zora Neale Hurston — “This volume enables readers both steeped in and new to Hurston to discover her acerbic wit, her crisp prose, and the breadth of her artistic ability and interests …. an invaluable nonfiction companion to the collection of Hurston’s short stories.” — Booklist

PARENTING

“How to Raise an Antiracist” by Ibram X. Kendi — “A readable and approachable guide . . . Because of its scope, nearly all readers will come away from Kendi’s message more aware and having found a point of resonance in their own lives. Best-selling Kendi is an antiracism trailblazer and parents, educators, and everyone else who cares for children will seek his guidance.”—Booklist (starred review)

PICTURE BOOK

“You’re in Good Paws” by Maureen Fergus

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Whales: Diving Into the Unknown” by Casey Zakroff — “Zip, an enthusiastic beaked whale, is eager to share everything he can about whale pods by broadcasting his very own undersea podcast! He will travel across the global ocean interviewing a diverse assortment of whales and dolphins about their amazing behaviors and habitats, as well as their interactions with the human world. Can this one small whale tell the story of the whole ocean and the interconnectivity that affects us all?” — Baker & Taylor

YA FICTION

“We Contain Multitudes” by Sarah Henstra — “This is an absolutely extraordinary work of fiction that proves the epistolary novel is an art form. Kurl and Jo are characters to die for, emotionally compelling and empathetic. Their quotidian lives are riveting and their story unforgettable…not to be missed.”―Booklist, starred review

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – JANUARY 2022

ADULT FICTION

“A Solitude of Wolverines” by Alice Henderson — “The novel is packed with action. Alex is smart, with an impressive knowledge of wildlife as well as guns and self-defense tactics. It’s no plot spoiler to say she survives and will be back.” — Denver Post

“Confessions on the 7:45” by Lisa Unger — “Diabolically clever…. [An] exquisitely crafted psychological thriller.” Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Deep Survival” by Laurence Gonzales — “Riveting accounts of avalanches, mountain accidents, sailors lost at sea, and the man-made hell of 9/11.”
Stephen Bodio, Sports Illustrated

“Home Before Dark” by Riley Sager — “In the latest thriller from New York Times bestseller Riley Sager, a woman returns to the house made famous by her father’s bestselling horror memoir. Is the place really haunted by evil forces, as her father claimed? Or are there more earthbound-and dangerous-secrets hidden within its walls?” — Baker & Taylor

“Last Summer at the Golden Hotel” by Elyssa Friedland — “Written with Friedland’s signature wit and sharp dialogue, Last Summer at the Golden Hotel is an incisive novel that touches on family legacies, nostalgia, and multigenerational dynamics. Readers not content with armchair immersion will want to book their Catskill getaway immediately.”–Booklist

“Malibu Rising” by Taylor Jenkins Reid — “Reid’s descriptions of Malibu are so evocative that readers will swear they feel the sea breeze on their faces or the grit of the sand between their toes. . . . A compulsively readable story about the bonds between family members and the power of breaking free.”Kirkus Reviews

“Normal People” by Sally Rooney — “[Rooney’s] two carefully observed and gentle comedies of manners . . . are tender portraits of Irish college students. . . . Remarkably precise—she captures meticulously the way a generation raised on social data thinks and talks.”—New York Review of Books

“The Castaways” by Lucy Clarke –“A beautifully written, emotional and intelligent thriller. Full of atmosphere and tension as well as brilliantly drawn characters that I cared about. I loved it!” — Claire Douglas. Amazon.com

The Nowhere Child” by Christian White — “In this stunning first novel, White weaves stories within stories while keeping the thrilling mystery alive. [A] tightly woven debut thriller.”―Library Journal (starred review)

ADULT MYSTERY

“The Long Call” by Ann Cleeves — “As usual with this talented author, the key is relationships, and the murder is an occasion to examine them and then, finally, to expose what rips them apart.”―Booklist

“The Heron’s Call” by Ann Cleeves — “In her follow-up to The Long Call (2019), Cleeves provides a complex mystery full of surprises. This character-driven exploration of people’s darkest flaws is a sterling example of Cleeves’ formidable talents.”Kirkus Reviews (Starred Review)

“The Sun Down Motel” by Simone St. James — “[A] truly nightmarish trip back and forth in time and into the supernatural…guaranteed to keep readers rapt…What a story!”—Booklist (starred review)

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“The Storyteller” by Dave Grohl — “Grohl candidly shares his reverence for the enduring power of music. . . Reflecting on his fame, Grohl writes, “I have never taken a single moment of it for granted.” Paired with his sparkling wit, this humility is what makes Grohl’s soulful story a cut above typical rock memoirs. There isn’t a dull moment here.” — Publishers Weekly (starred review)

ADULT NON-FICTION

“How to Forage for Mushrooms Without Dying: An Absolute Beginner’s Guide to Identifying 29 Wild, Edible Mushrooms” by Frank Hyman — “Using vivid photos, the book explains how to identify, clean, preserve and cook 29 varieties of edible mushrooms, while celebrating the glorious range of mushroom scents (watermelon rind, fish, lemon) and flavors (hints of crabmeat, chicken, egg noodles, vanilla).” — Peter Saenger, Wall Street Journal 

“Patterns in Nature: Why the Natural World Looks the Way It Does” by Philip Ball — “From tigers’ stripes to the hexagons that make up honeycombs to the ripples in windblown sand, the natural world is full of order and regularity. Science writer Ball investigates the phenomenon in his new book, Patterns in Nature, with 250 photographs of snowflakes, shells, and more. Nature’s patterns follow basic principles of mathematics and physics, leading to similarities in the stripes, spirals, branches and fractals around us. ‘There’s an abundance of detail in nature that we can’t see,” he says. “Even in what seems unstructured, there’s pattern.’” ― Wall Street Journal

“Sandor Katz’s Fermentation Journeys: Recipes, Techniques, and Traditions from Around the World” by Sandor Ellix Katz — “Sandor Katz documents the joys, quirks, and health benefits of fermentation in all its global variety. This encyclopedic cookbook-cum-travel memoir provides 60 recipes that are seeded within a broader discussion of regional techniques and traditions, peppered with profiles of the experts and eateries discovered by Katz on his voyages. . . .This international romp is funky in the best of ways.”Publishers Weekly

“Second-Chance Dogs: True Stories of the Dogs We Rescue and the Dogs Who Rescue Us” by Callie Smith Grant — “This collection of more than thirty contemporary, true, feel-good stories spotlights the beauty of being rescued–dogs rescued by people, people rescued by dogs, and even dogs who rescue other animals. It’s the perfect companion–well, besides the four-legged, tail-wagging kind–for your morning cup of coffee or an evening curled up on the couch.” — Amazon.com

“The 1619 Project” by Nikole Hannah-Jones — “This ongoing initiative from The New York Times Magazine that began on the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery reimagines if our national narrative actually started in late August of 1619, when a ship arrived in Jamestown bearing a cargo of 20-30 enslaved people from Africa.” — Atlas Publishing

“Winter Recipes from the Collective” by Louise Gluck — “Glück considers a primary human loneliness in humane, reflective poems that are deeply engaged with the idea of being alone with oneself . . . With this magnificent collection, a great poet delivers a treatise on how to live and die.” ―Publishers Weekly (Starred Review)

BLUE/DVD MOVIES

“The Dry”
“Dune”
“Spencer”

BOARD BOOK

“Norbert the Winter Game” by Daniela Drescher

PICTURE BOOK

“Accident” by Andrea Tsurumi

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Annie Sullivan and the Trials of Helen Keller” by Joseph Lambert — “In Annie Sullivan and the Trials of Helen Keller, author and illustrator Joseph Lambert examines the powerful bond between teacher and pupil, forged through the intense frustrations and revelations of Helen’s early education. The result is an inspiring, emotional, and wholly original take on the story of these two great Americans.” — Amazon.com

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – DECEMBER 2021

ADULT FICTION

“A Calling for Charlie Barnes” by Joshua Ferris — “”Ferris writes with an exuberant style that propels the reader… as A Calling for Charlie Barnes shows, fiction is an art form deliberately used to get to a deeper truth than fact. It’s not a denial of reality, but a more serious journey into it.”―The Boston Globe

“Chronicles from the Land of the Happiest People on Earth” by Wole Soyinka — “A biting satire that looks at corruption in an imaginary contemporary Nigeria, Chronicles is also an intriguing and droll whodunit. . . . A brilliant story that takes on politics, class, corruption, and religion from the very first chapters. It highlights Soyinka’s lush, elegant language.” Publishers Weekly

“Detransition, Baby” by Torrey Peters” — “With heart and savvy, [Detransition, Baby upends] our traditional, gendered notions of what parenthood can look like.”The New York Times Book Review

“Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone” by Dina Gabaldon — “It is 1779 and Claire and Jamie are at last reunited with their daughter, Brianna, her husband, Roger, and their children on Fraser’s Ridge. Having the family together is a dream the Frasers had thought impossible. Yet even in the North Carolina backcountry, the effects of war are being felt. Tensions in the Colonies are great and local feelings run hot enough to boil Hell’s teaketttle. Jamie knows loyalties among his tenants are split and it won’t be long until the war is on his doorstep”– Baker & Taylor

“Hamnet” by Maggie O’Farrell — “Miraculous… brilliant… A novel told with the urgency of a whispered prayer — or curse…  through the alchemy of her own vision, she has created a moving story about the way loss viciously recalibrates a marriage…  A richly drawn and intimate portrait of 16th-century English life set against the arrival of one devastating death.”
–Ron Charles, The Washington Post

“Harlem Shuffle” by Colson Whitehead — “Fast-paced, keen-eyed and very funny, “Harlem Shuffle” is a novel about race, power and the history of Harlem all disguised as a thrill-ride crime novel.” San Francisco Chronicle

“My Monticello” by Jocelyn Nicole Johnson — “The narrative is bold, harrowing and unfolds with urgency. Johnson’s collection is . . . concerned with issues surrounding racial identity and the legacies of slavery and racism. Together they create an unnerving portrait of a country wrestling with its ugly past and present.” Time

“Never” by Ken Follett — “Absolutely compelling . . . A smart, scary, and all-too-plausible thriller.”Booklist

“North” by Brian Kessler — “In Brad Kessler’s fine new novel, North…the seemingly disparate lives that converge on a snowy Vermont night—Sahro, a Somali refugee seeking asylum, and Father Christopher, the abbot of a mountain monastery—are woven together with intricate threads of home, flight, sanctuary, danger, hope, faith, storytelling and much more.”―Shelf Awareness

“Our Country Friends” by Gary Shteyngart — “At turns bitingly funny and unbearably sad, it’s among the first major works of literary fiction to wrestle with the psychological, sociological and cultural impact of the pandemic, and marks a new, more reflective register for Shteyngart.”—The New York Times

Silverview” by John Le Carre — “One of [le Carré’s] most touching and satisfying [novels] – for putting into high relief this beloved author’s vision for his country and his disappointments, and perhaps most of all, the elegance and coloristic palette of his unique and incomparable prose.” —Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

“Such a Quiet Place” by Megan Miranda — “Miranda, who makes the setting, where everyone knows one another and ends up fearing one another, all the more chilling for its seeming normality, is a master of misdirection and sudden plot twists, leading up to a wallop of an ending. A powerful, paranoid thriller.” – Booklist (Starred Review)

“Termination Shock” by Neal Stephenson — “Stephenson is one of speculative fiction’s most meticulous architects. . . .Termination Shock manages to pull off a rare trick, at once wildly imaginative and grounded.” — New York Times Book Review

“The Holiday Swap” by Maggie Knox — “The Holiday Swap dishes up a double dose of fun-loving, feel-good, Christmas cheer, with a recipe for love that’s deliciously irresistible.” —Karen Schaler, author of Finding Christmas

“The Morning Star” by Karl Ove Knausgaard — “Knausgaard retains the ability to lock you, as if in a tractor beam, into his storytelling. He takes the mundane stuff of life—the need to take a leak, the joy of killing pesky flies—and essentializes them . . . Knausgaard is among the finest writers alive.” —Dwight Garner, New York Times

“The Northern Reach” by W. S. Winslow — “Is there anything better than getting to walk through a small and unfamiliar town and peer through the windows into the lives lived in the houses there? The Northern Reach gives you that rich and satisfying treat. Here is a Maine as various and stark as the pull of tides in every human heart.” – Sarah Blake, author of The Guest Book

“The Only Woman in the Room” by Marie Benedict — “A powerful book based on the incredible true story of the glamour icon and scientist, The Only Woman in the Room is a masterpiece that celebrates the many women in science that history has overlooked.” — Amazon.com

“The Other Black Girl” by Zaklya Dalila Harris — “A satire of the clueless racial politics at a prestigious literary house with, in its second half, a horror-movie twist.” ― Wall Street Journal

“The Parted Earth” by Anjali Enjeti — “Like her characters, Enjeti ultimately reaches for hope. The Parted Earth is a testament to the tremendous strength of the people of India and Pakistan who found the courage to begin again.” —Shelf Awareness

“The Room on Rue Amilie” by Kristin Harmel — “Harmel writes a poignant novel based loosely on the true story of an American woman who helped on the Comet Line, which rescued hundreds of airmen and soldiers. This compelling story celebrates hope and bravery in the face of evil.”– (Booklist)

“The Sentence” by Louise Erdrich — “Scintillating…More than a gripping ghost story, THE SENTENCE offers profound insights into the effects of the global pandemic and the collateral damage of systemic racism. It adds up to one of Erdrich’s most…illuminating works to date.”  — Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“The Stars We Share” by Rafe Posey — “This compelling debut novel offers rich descriptions [and] . . . plenty to discuss about how world events impact individuals and the sometimes heart-wrenching compromises we must make to find happiness.” Booklist

“The Wish” by Nicholas Sparks — “As with all of Sparks’ novels, emotions play a huge part. Though a bittersweet story, The Wish is a thought-provoking chronicle of a few decades in the protagonist’s life. In the course of that life, she unearths her self-worth, self-acceptance, and the magnitude of first love.” – New York Journal of Books

“What Strange Paradise” by Omar El Akkad — “El Akkad’s compelling, poetic prose captures the precarity and desperation of people pushed to the brink . . . A compassionate snapshot of one Syrian refugee’s struggle to plot a course for home.”Kirkus Reviews

“Wish You Were Here” by Jodi Picoult — “Wish You Were Here is a transporting and transcendent novel about seeking out glimmers of light in the darkness, and following them wherever they lead. Jodi Picoult is that rare, one-in-a-million writer whose books both squeeze your heart and expand your mind. Her latest is wise, surprising, and utterly extraordinary.”⁠—Emily Henry, #1 New York Times bestselling author of People We Meet on Vacation and Beach Read

ADULT MYSTERY

Faithless in Death” by J. D. Robb — “In Faithless in Death, the new Eve Dallas police thriller from #1 New York Times bestselling author Nora Roberts, what looked like a lover’s quarrel turned fatal has bigger―and more terrifying―motives behind it…” — Amazon.com

“Miss Moriarty, I Presume” by Sherry Thomas — “When her enemy Moriarty asks her to find his daughter, Charlotte Holmes is led to a remote community of occult practitioners where Ms. Moriarty was last seen, a place of lies and liars, making her wonder why he has entrusted this delicate matter to her of all people. Original.” — Atlas Publishing

“Remembering the Dead” by Elizabeth J. Duncan — “This cozy contains numerous plot twists and is steeped in Welsh history, populated with full-bodied characters, and surrounded by lovingly described Welsh and Irish locales.” —Booklist

“The Coldest Case: A Bruno, Chief of Police Novel” by Martin Walker — “Packed with descriptions of the food Courrèges and his friends cook, of the gorgeous French countryside and of the local community, this book is pure escapism. . . . It is a delight to dip into [Bruno’s] sun-baked world.”The Observer (London)

“The Jealousy Man and Other Stories” by Jo Nesbo — “Nesbø delivers stories ranging from dystopian visions to time-honored tales of duplicity and revenge. . . . Wonderfully atmospheric. . . . He never runs out of ideas.”
Kirkus Reviews

ADULT NON-FICTION

“A Most Remarkable Creature: The Hidden Live and Epic Journey of the World’s Smartest Birds of Prey” by Jonathan Meiburg — “A first book by an award-winning natural-science writer introduces readers to the remarkable world of the caracaras social bird of prey, discussing how the species baffled Darwin and why it has remained confined to a small South American region. …” — Atlas Publishing

“A People’s Guide to Greater Boston” by Joseph Nevins — “It’s a timely, intelligent, and necessary guide, one that deepens our understanding of where we live now and reminds us of the power that regular citizens have to work against powers and systems that are, now as then, in urgent need of change.” Boston Globe

“America on Fire: The Untold Story of Police Violence and Black Rebellion Since the 1960s” by Elizabeth Hinton — “A must-read for all concerned with civil rights and social justice in modern America.”― Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Carving Out a Living on the Land: Lessons in Resourcefulmess and Craft from an Unusual Christmas Tree Farm” by Emmet Van Driesche — “The lessons here, cleanly told, serve the aspiring farmer, small business owner, and demonstrate not just how to run a farm, but how to build a sustainable and deeply satisfying life with the skills you have, and the ones you can learn.”―Boston Globe

“Collective Wisdom: Lessons, Inspiration and Advice from Women over 50” by Grace Bonney — “Grace Bonney is a force, she did it again. Her latest book, Collective Wisdom, celebrates . . . a richly diverse group of trailblazing women over 50. Ordered!” —Tina Roth Eisenberg, the Swiss Miss Newsletter for Everyone

“Crochet Colorwork Made Easy: Simple Techniques to Create Mulitcolor Sweater, Acessories and Home Décor” by Claire Goodale — “If you want to master colorwork crochet this book is a must. With clear instructions and beautiful, inspiring patterns you’ll be hooking in color in no time.”
Sarah Huntington, editor at Simply Crochet magazine

“Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence” by Anna Lembke — “[An] eye-opening survey on pleasure-seeking and addiction… Readers looking for balance will return to Lembke’s informative and fascinating guidance.” Publishers Weekly starred review

“Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest” by Suzanne Simard — “Vivid and inspiring . . . For Simard, personal experience leads to revelation, and scientific revelation leads to personal insight . . . Finding the Mother Tree helps make sense of a forest of mysteries. It might even persuade you that organisms other than ourselves—even fungi—have agency.”—Eugenia Bone, The Wall Street Journal

“Fiske Guide to Colleges 2022” by Edward B. Fiske — “The best college guide you can buy.”USA Today

“How to Invent Everything: A Survival Guide for the Stranded Time Traveler” by Ryan North — “Packed with cool, fun, and useful stuff… a friendly and thought-provoking reference, just the thing for the bright kid in the family, to say nothing of the neighborhood time traveler.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Life’s Edge” The Search for What It Means to be Alive” by Carl Zimmer — “From the struggle to define when life begins and ends to the hunt for how life got started, [Life’s Edge] offers an engaging, in-depth look at some of biology’s toughest questions.” Science News

“North American Maps for Curious Minds: 100 New Ways to See the Continent” by Matthew Bucklan — “Fascinating. . . . A captivating browse that will unobtrusively enlighten readers and upend things they thought they knew. . . . A great choice.” Library Journal

“Outlandish: Walking Europe’s Unlikely Landscapes” by Nick Hunt — “In Outlandish, acclaimed travel writer Nick Hunt takes us across landscapes that should not be there, wildernesses found in Europe yet seemingly belonging to far-off continents: a patch of Arctic tundra in Scotland; the continent’s largest surviving remnant of primeval forest in Poland and Belarus; Europe’s only true desert in Spain; and the fathomless grassland steppes of Hungary.” — Amazon.com

“Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat: Mastering the Elements of Good Cooking” by Samin Nosrat — “Just reading Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat will make you a better cook, adept at seasoning, balancing, understanding what it really is you’re doing and why… Make room on the bedside table—and the countertop.” ― Bon Appetit

“Taking of Jemima Boone: Colonial Settlers, Tribal Nations and the Kidnap that Shaped America” by Matthew Peal — “A deliciously intricate and utterly absorbing retelling of the Daniel Boone family saga–—and particularly the complex roles played by the Cherokee and Shawnee across Boone’s southern Appalachian stamping grounds. The Taking of Jemima Boone adds an intriguing dimension to an issue of keen importance to modern society.” — New York Times bestselling author Simon Winchester

“The Age of AI: And Our Human Future” by Henry A. Kissinger, Eric Schmidt and Daniel Huttenlocher with Schuyler Schouten — “Three leading thinkers put their heads together to explore artificial intelligence and how it will change our relationships with knowledge, politics, and the societies in which we live.” — Baker & Taylor

The Cause: The American Revolution and Its Discontents, 1773-1783″ by Joseph J. Ellis — “[A] speedy retelling of the nation’s stumbling, fractured founding, through evocative profiles of British loyalists, slaves, Native Americans and soldiers uncertain of what was being founded.”
Christopher Borrelli, Chicago Tribune

“The Code Breaker: Jennifer Doudna, Gene Editing and the Future of the Human Race” by Walter Isaacson —  “Deftly written, conveying the history of CRISPR and also probing larger themes: the nature of discovery, the development of biotech, and the fine balance between competition and collaboration that drives many scientists.”— New York Review of Books

“The Dawn of Everything: A New History of Humanity” by David Graeber —
“[The Dawn of Everything] took as its immodest goal nothing less than upending everything we think we know about the origins and evolution of human societies . . . [the book] aims to synthesize new archaeological discoveries of recent decades that haven’t made it out of specialist journals and into public consciousness.”―Jennifer Schuessler, New York Times

“The Extended Mind the Power of Thinking Outside the Brain” by Annie Murphy Paul — “The Extended Mind argues that our creativity, our intelligence, and even our memories are embodied not just in the wet matter of our brains, but in the world all around us. This is a profoundly interesting book that invites us to radically change how we think about thinking.”—Joshua Foer, author of Moonwalking with Einstein

“The Family Roe: An American Story” by Joshua Prager — “Mr. Prager’s book is stupendous, a masterwork of reporting…. If you want to understand Roe more deeply before the coming decision, read it.” ― Peggy Noonan, Wall Street Journal

“The Handcarved Bowl: Design & Create Custom Bowls From Scratch” by Danielle Rose Byrd — “The Handcarved Bowl provides step-by-step photos and directions for every stage of the bowlcarving process that will appeal to everyone from beginning woodworkers to seasoned carvers.” — Amazon.com

“The Quiet Zone: Unraveling the Mystery of a Town Suspended by Silence” by Stephen Kurczy — “Captivating. … A multilayered illustration of a unique community where things aren’t always what they seem.” — Kirkus Reviews

“Wilderness Axe Skills and Campcraft” by Paul Kirtley — “An easily understandable guide to key skills for bushcrafters, campers, outdoors lovers, and anyone interested in wilderness living.  …Through detailed explanations and step-by-step photo sequences, you too will be able to develop effective and timesaving campcraft skills using materials freely available in the woods, including pot hangers, tripods, cranes, and a variety of group camp set-ups. An indispensable addition to any bushcraft, woodcraft camping, and outdoor library.” — Amazon.com

BIOGRAPHY

“Crying in H Mart: A Memoir” by Michele Zauner — “Lyrical… Earnest… Zauner does a good job capturing the grief of losing a parent with pathos. Fans looking to get a glimpse into the inner life of this megawatt pop star will not be disappointed.”Publishers Weekly

“Invisible Child: Poverty, Survival & Hope in An American City” by Andrea Elliot — “Stunning . . . a remarkable achievement that speaks to the heart and conscience of a nation.”Publishers Weekly (starred review)

BLUE/DVD MOVIES

“Dear Evan Hansen”
“No Time to Die”
“Respect”

“Shang-chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings”

ITEMS

Old Stone House Museum Slate Kit
Small Skis

BOARD BOOK

“We Are Grateful” Otsaliheliga” by Traci Sorell

PICTURE BOOK

“A Friend Like You” by Frank Murphy and Charnaie Gordon
“Big Feelings” by Alexandra Penfold
“It Fell From the Sky” by Fan Brothers
“Mistletoe: A Christmas Story” by Tad Hills
“Moose’s Book Bus” by Inga Moore
“Mr. Watson’s Chickens” by Jarrett Dapier
“My 2 Border Towns” by David Bowles
“Our Table” by Peter J. Reynolds
“Ten Ways to Hear Snow” by Cathy Camper
“The 1619 Project: Born on the Water” by Nikloe Hannah-Jones & Renee Watson
“The Barnabus Project” by Terry Fan
“The Nutcracker” by Jan Brett
“Where is the Buddha?” by Thich Nhat Hanh
“Winter Dance” by Dane Bauer

JUVENILE BIOGRAPHY

“I Am An American: The Wong Kim Ark Story” by Martha Brockenbrough — “Kuo’s fine-lined digital art, gracefully employing reds, blues, and browns, presents an immersive backdrop to this solid historical primer, which also resonates in the present day.”―Publishers Weekly

JUVENILE DVD

Paw Patrol: The Movie”

JUVENILE FICTION

“Charlies Thorne and the Last Equation” by Stuart Gibbs — “Charlie is a terrific hero—outrageously smart, courageous, and still believable as a kid. After this explosive start, young readers will eagerly await her next adventure.” ― Publishers Weekly

“Cursed Carnival and Other Calamaties” by Rick Riordan and others — “I hope you enjoy your trip through the multiverse mansion as much as I did. The real danger is that once you start exploring all the wonders herein, you may want to stay forever.”–Rick Riordan

“How to Train Your Dad” by Gary Paulsen — “The tall-tale, anecdotal quality of Carl’s story is entertaining with its recitation of disastrous, smelly, embarrassing, dangerous, and misguided moments . . . Funny, sure-handed, wise.” ―Kirkus Reviews

“Paul Santiago and the River of Tears” by Tehlor Kay Mejia — “This fast-paced journey into Latinx folklore, with its clever protagonist, is sure to keep readers turning pages into the night.” – Booklist (starred review)

“Wings of Fire: The Dangerous Gift” by Tui T. Sutherland — “Using rare magic to secure the boundaries around her kingdom, Queen Snowfall gives asylum to refugee dragons of uncertain trustworthiness before considering a high-risk alternate plan to escort hostile tribes out of IceWing territory” — Atlas Publishing

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Saving Sorya: Chang and the Sun Bear” by Trang Nguyen — “Uplifting . . . the epitome of wild and free. . . . Breathtaking visuals and a compelling story.”Kirkus Reviews, starred review

JUVENILE NON-FICTION

“A Peacemaker for Warring Nations: The Founding of the Iroquois League” by Joseph Bruchac — “In A Peacemaker for Warring Nations, renowned Native author Joseph Bruchac draws from the teachings of both contemporary and past Iroquois tradition bearersin telling the story of how “the Peacemaker,” a divine messenger sent by the Creator, helped to bring an end to the bitter warring of the Five Iroquois Nations and how he founded the famed League of the Iroquois, which was later to influence the US Constitution.” — Annotation

“Celebrate Your Body (And Its Changes, Too!)” by Sonya Renee Taylor — “Taylor’s book unapologetically leads with the positive, focusing much more on what bodies can do rather than what they look like. Even with that focus, Taylor manages to hammer home that all bodies are beautiful, that it’s possible to be healthy at every size, and that each body progresses at its own rate…”―Rachelle Hampton, slate.com

“Nature Play at Home: Creating Outdoor Spaces that Connect Children with the Natural World” by Nancy Striniste — “With Striniste’s guidance, natural playscapes can awaken the senses, challenge bodies, inspire imagination, build confidence, and create comfort for all ages. Nature Play at Home is sure to Inspire readers to take action in their backyards and encourage creative play in nature for years to come.” Booklist

“Water: A Deep Dive of Discovery” by Christy Mihaly — “…This comprehensive yet accessible exploration of water will help young readers understand many aspects of one of our planet’s most precious resources – and how they can protect it. A friendly water droplet character guides children through topics ranging from melting and freezing to the ways in which water literally shapes the Earth. Tales by storytellers from around the world are sprinkled through the book, highlighting the variety of ways in which global cultures value water. The engaging format includes gatefolds and booklets with hands-on activity ideas for learning about and protecting water. ” — Annotation

“Women’s Right to Vote” by Kate Messner — “An engaging introduction to the real stories behind the fight for women’s voting rights combines fun facts with graphic panels, sidebars and more to challenge popular misconceptions and reveal what suffragists actually endured for the sake of voting equality.” — Atlas Publishing

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – OCTOBER 2021

ADULT FICTION

“Civilizations” by Laurent Binet – “An ambitious and highly entertaining novel of revisionist history from the author of the international bestseller HHhH, Laurent Binet’s Civilizations is nothing less than a strangely believable counterfactual history of the modern world, fizzing with ideas about colonization, empire-building, and the eternal human quest for domination. It is an electrifying novel by one of Europe’s most exciting writers.” — McMillan Palgrave

“Cloud Cuckoo Land” by Anthony Doerr – “Doerr builds a community of readers and nature lovers that transcends the boundaries of time and space … This is just one of the many narrative miracles worked by the author as he brings a first-century story to its conclusion in 2146. As the pieces of this magical literary puzzle snap together, a flicker of hope is sparked for our benighted world.” Kirkus, starred review

“Crossroads” by Jonathan Franzen — “Franzen returns with a sweeping and masterly examination of the shifting culture of early 1970s America, the first in a trilogy . . . Throughout, Franzen exhibits his remarkable ability to build suspense through fraught interpersonal dynamics. It’s irresistible.” ―Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Light from Uncommon Stars” by Ryka Aoki — “Aoki’s novel is an exciting, wild web of an adventure, an unputdownable book about music, found family, and identity. Diving into the tough subjects, Aoki’s book emerges with a joyful, queer, radical ballad of a story. . .”―Booklist, starred review

“State of Terror” by Hilary Rodham Clinton and Louise Penny — “Consistently entertaining….Penny and Clinton demonstrate a sure hand at international intrigue and narrative pacing….The real key to ‘State of Terror,’ though, is its secret weapon: female friendship.” ― The Washington Post

“The Lincoln Highway” by Amor Towles — “[A] playfully thought-provoking novel . . . [Towles] juggles the pieces of his plot deftly, shifting from voice to voice, skirting sentimentality and quirkiness with a touch of wistful regret, and leading up to an ending that is bound to provoke discussion.” Booklist (starred)

ADULT MYSTERY

“Nerve Attack” by S. Lee Manning — “Manning writes with such authority about the shady world and shifting loyalties of the intelligence community, it’s a wonder her novels aren’t riddled with redactions. At once terrifying, unpredictable, and all too believable, NERVE ATTACK will leave you breathless.” –Chris Holm, Anthony award winning author of The Killing Kind.

“To Kill the Messenger” by Philip S. Cook — This is the story of Russell Griswold—an itinerant newspaper editor—who came to northern New Mexico after the Civil War to start a weekly newspaper in the small town of San Miguel. He hoped to earn a modest living and help build a thriving and vibrant community.

Griswold’s published comments on activities that he finds unlawful or inappropriate were often cruel and demeaning. Ultimately this leads to a sudden and violent attempt on his life.

There is any number of possible suspects whether aggrieved or not. … So, who would want to kill a newspaper editor?” — Blurb, Inc.

ADULT NON-FICTION

“My Grandmother’s Hands: Racialized Trauma and the Pathway to Mending Our Hearts and Bodies” by Resmaa Menakem — “My Grandmother’s Hands is full of wisdom and understanding. In it, Resmaa Menakem offers a new way to understand racism and, more importantly, to heal it. This book lays out a path to freedom and peace, first for individual readers, then for our culture as a whole. A must-read for everyone who cares about our country.”―Nancy Van Dyken, LP, LICSW, author of Everyday Narcissism

“Peril” by Bob Woodward and Robert Costa — “Woodward and Costa make a powerful case that America has had a narrow escape. It leaves all Americans, in particular the Republican Party, with some thinking to do”—Justin Webb, The Times, UK.

“To Save The People From Themselves”: The Emergence of American Judicial Review and the Transformation of the Constitutions” by Robert J. Steinfeld — “… Robert Steinfeld examines how the distinctive US form of constitutional review emerged from a background tradition in which legislatures and executives assessed constitutionality in their regular work. Combining institutional, political, and intellectual history, Professor Steinfeld shows how the transformation was both rapid and strongly contested. Seeing judicial review as part of a conservative counterrevolution against the democratic excesses of post-Revolutionary legislatures, this is an important new contribution to long-standing discussions about judicial review in the United States.” — Mark Tushnet, William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law Emeritus, Harvard Law School

“Voices from the Pandemic: Americans Tell Their Stories of Crisis, Courage and Resilience” by Eli Saslow — “Saslow has done a sterling job of capturing real people’s experiences of the start of the pandemic.” –Tampa Bay Times

VERMONT NON-FICTION

“Vermont History: Volume 89, No. 2, Summer/Fall 2021”

PARENTING

“Hunt, Gather, Parent: What Ancient Cultures Can Teach Us About the Lost Art of Raising Happy, Helpful Little Humans” by Michaeleen Doucleff, Ph. D. — “Hunt, Gather, Parent is full of smart ideas that I immediately wanted to force on my own kids. (I wish I’d read it at the start of the pandemic, when I made their chore charts.) Doucleff is a dogged reporter who’s good at observing families and breaking down what they’re doing.”
—Pamela Druckerman, The New York Times Book Review

“Parenting 4 Social Justice: Tips, Tools, and Inspiration for Conversations & Action with Kids” by Angela Berkfield — “Berkfield, a social justice training facilitator and cofounder of the Root Social Justice Center, has written this volume with five co-authors…. Each chapter starts with questions for reflection that can be used as starting points for further conversation with kids. The book teaches how to build seven social justice principles into discussion and action, then shows how to apply these principles to racial, economic, gender, and disability justice. Berkfield asserts that people gain personal power when their basic needs are met; then violence, addiction, or isolation can begin to abate.” — Julia M. Reffner. LIBRARY JOURNAL

“The Life of Fred: Edgewood” by Stanley F. Schmidt Ph. D. — “This is a child-directed course. The student reads the adventure story, does the math problems that occur as a natural part of the story, and checks their answers (the solutions are right there for the looking.) And learns to love math in the process! You will not get the detailed formula explanations that you get in a traditional math book. I am still amazed that kids can read the story and learn the concepts, but they do!” — Amazon.com

“Zillions of Practice Problems: Fractions” by Stanley F. Schmidt Ph. D. — “Practice problems for the first book in the Life of Fred Upper Elementary/Middle School Series. Need more practice with fractions? Zillions of Practice Problems Fractions has you covered” — Amazon.com

ITEMS

Orion StarBlast Telescope

PICTURE BOOK

“A Day with Yayah” by Nicola I. Campbell
“All the Way to the Top: How One Girl’s Fight for Americans with Disabilities Changed Everything” by Annette Bay Pimentl
“Bodies are Cool” by Tyler Feder
“Bright Star” by Yuyi Morales
“Change Sings: A Children’s Anthem” by Amanda Gorman
“Einstein: The Fantastic Journey of a Mouse through Space and Time” by Torben Kuhlmann
“How Many Seeds in a Pumpkin?” by Margaret McNamara
“Listen” by Gabi Snyder
“Little Witch Hazel: A Year in the Forest” by Phoebe Wahl
“Over and Under the Canyon” by Kate Messner
“Peace Train” by Cat Stevens
“The First Blade of Sweetgrass: A Native American Story” by Suzanne Greenlaw and Gabriel Frey
“The Memory Box: A Book About Grief” by Joanna Rowland
“The Rhythm of the Rain” by Grahame Baker-Smith
“The Tree in Me” by Corinna Luyken
They, She, He, Me: Free to Be!” by Maya and Matthew Smith-Gonzalez
“Tomatoes for Neela” by Padma Lakshmi
“Tough Guys (Have Feelings Too)” by Keith Negley

JUVENILE BIOGRAPHY

“Chance: Escape from Holocaust” by Uri Shulevitz — “Though touching on many dark and serious topics, this story is totally focused on the fears, triumphs, and sensibilities of a child. It is truly a portrait of an artist as a young man thrust into a maelstrom of a world gone mad and relying on chance to decide his fate.” ―The Horn Book, starred review

JUVENILE FICTION

“365 Days to Alaska” by Cathy Carr — “Carr’s heartfelt debut features classic middle-school problems, like dodging mean kids, as well as Rigel’s vivid feelings of displacement and deep love for nature.”  ― Booklist

“Ara Shah and the End of Time” by Roshani Chokshi — “In her middle-grade debut, Chokshi spins a fantastical narrative that seamlessly intertwines Hindu cosmology and folklore, feminism, and witty dialogue for an uproarious novel for young readers. Chokshi comes into her own in this novel, reminding readers of the power of language and of stories.”―Kirkus (starred review)

“Barefoot Dreams of Petra Luna” by Alda P. Dobbs — “Historical fiction that is as relevant as ever…A timeless and timely tale of one girl’s journey to save her family and discover herself.” ― Kirkus Reviews

Eugenia Lincoln and the Unexpected Package” by Kate DiCamillo — “As in the earlier books, believable (if eccentric) personalities, sophisticated vocabulary, and polished prose make this an inviting title for emerging chapter- book readers. Fans of this series and the earlier Mercy Watson books will be amazed by Eugenia’s partial redemption and delight that the results are merely temporary.” —Booklist

Finding Junie Kim” by Ellen Oh — “She seamlessly provides insight into Korean history and culture for the unintroduced and captures the human condition during wartime through frank portrayals of Junie’s modern-day struggles…Oh’s powerful novel sheds light on the devastating effect racism can have, and tells a history often overlooked.” — School Library Journal (starred review)

“Healer of the Water Monster” by Brian Young — “The deeply grounded and original perspective of this story brings readers into both the worlds of Navajo blessing songs, rain songs, and traditional healing and everyday family relationships. Hands readers a meaningful new take on family love.” — Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“Kaleidoscope” by Brian Selznick — “Selznick and Serlin take the easy reader format to new creative heights….The sharp pacing and charming humor also make it an excellent read-aloud choice….as funny as it is elegant. This will be enjoyed equally by youngsters and their grown-ups.” — School Library Journal, starred review

“King and the Dragonflies” by Kacen Callender — “Callender masterfully balances resonant themes of grief, love, family, friendship, racism, sexuality, and coming-of-age…deeply affecting, memorable.”-The Horn Book, starred review

“Let’s Mooove!” by Courtney Sheinmel — “Travel around the United States of America with twins Finn and Molly in this new chapter book series that highlights a different state in each book! … We must be dreaming! That’s what twins Finn and Molly Parker think when they discover a camper in their driveway–and it talks! When the RV transports them to a cattle ranch in Colorado, the twins know something magical has happened. Then the camper disappears, leaving Finn and Molly to wonder . . . how are we going to get home?..” — ONIX annotations

“Long Lost” by Jacqueline West — “In a spooky middle grade love letter to libraries and the mystery genre, West crafts a spellbinding exploration of sisterhood. . . . Alternating a contemporary third-person narrative with the found book’s parallel telling, West draws readers into a supernaturally tinged dual story, simultaneously offering an authentic portrait of sibling angst.” — Publishers Weekly

“Paradise on Fire” by Jewell Parker Rhodes — “Placing biracial boyhood and the struggles of colorism at its center, the novel challenges readers to pursue their own self-definition.”―Kirkus

“Rez Dogs” by Joseph Bruchac — “Hidden throughout this moving novel in verse, old stories are discovered like buried treasures.”—Kirkus, starred review

“Set Me Free” by Ann Clare LeZotte — “Full of adventure and twists, and LeZotte never shies away from addressing racism, ableism, or sexism…the book’s themes resonate today, as Mary fights for the rights of all people and offers hope to readers facing challenges. A gripping tale of historical fiction.” — Booklist

The Beatryce Prophecy” by Kate DiCamillo — “The incomparable Kate DiCamillo offers a lovely fable of a girl, a monk and a goat, a tale that is a testament of the power of love (as so many of her books are) and the power of the written word to change the world for the better.” —The Buffalo News

“The Ickabog” by J. K. Rowlings — “Once upon a time there was a tiny kingdom called Cornucopia, as rich in happiness as it was in gold, and famous for its food. From the delicate cream cheeses of Kurdsburg to the Hopes-of-Heaven pastries of Chouxville, each was so delicious that people wept with joy as they ate them. But even in this happy kingdom, a monster lurks. Legend tells of a fearsome creature living far to the north in the Marshlands… the Ickabog. Some say it breathes fire, spits poison, and roars through the mist as it carries off wayward sheep and children alike. Some say it’s just a myth… And when that myth takes on a life of its own, casting a shadow over the kingdom, two children – best friends Bert and Daisy – embark on a great adventure to untangle the truth and find out where the real monster lies, bringing hope and happiness to Cornucopia once more.” — Publisher Annotation:

“The Last Fallen Star” by Graci Kim — “From a compelling and endearing supporting cast to the rich and tantalizing Korean cuisine explored in its pages, this pays homage to traditional Korean magic and mythos while infusing it with a contemporary story line and characters readers will fall in love with in an instant. Riley’s unmistakable voice and her relatable search for and exploration of her identity will connect with readers at their cores, offering a truly promising start to a fantastical series.”―Booklist (starred review)

“The Storm Runner” by Jennifer Cervantes — “J. C. Cervantes is about to take you on a trip you will never forget, through the darkest, strangest, and funniest twists and turns of Maya myth. You will meet the scariest gods you can imagine, the creepiest denizens of the Underworld, and the most amazing and unlikely heroes who have to save our world from being ripped apart.”―Rick Riordan

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Draw a Comic!” by J. P. Coovert — “…With Maker Comics: Draw a Comic! you’ll learn to create and print your own comics books! Follow these simple steps to sketch out your story ideas and ink a comic page. Learn which art supplies are best for drawing comics—you can use a pen, a brush, or even a computer! With the help of photocopy machine, you can even self-publish your own comics and share them with your friends!” — Amazon.com

“History Smashers: The Titanic” by Kate Messner — “Critical, respectful, engaging: exemplary history for children.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Snapdragon” by Kat Leh — “Snapdragon invigorates a classic hero’s journey with magic and heart.”―The AV Club

“The Girl from the Sea” by Molly Knox Ostergag — “Fifteen-year-old Morgan has a secret: She can’t wait to escape the perfect little island where she lives. She’s desperate to finish high school and escape her sad divorced mom, her volatile little brother, and worst of all, her great group of friends…who don’t understand Morgan at all. Because really, Morgan’s biggest secret is that she has a lot of secrets, including the one about wanting to kiss another girl. Then one night, Morgan is saved from drowning by a mysterious girl named Keltie. The two become friends and suddenly life on the island doesn’t seem so stifling anymore.But Keltie has some secrets of her own. And as the girls start to fall in love, everything they’re each trying to hide will find its way to the surface…whether Morgan is ready or not.” — Publisher Annotation:

“The Golden Compass: The Graphic Novel” by Stephanie Melchior-Durand — “Now, in this graphic novel adaptation of The Golden Compass, the world of His Dark Materials is brought to visual life. The stunning full-color art will offer both new and returning readers a chance to experience the story of Lyra, an ordinary girl with an extraordinary role to play in the fates of multiple worlds, in an entirely fresh way. This volume collects the full journey of Lyra to the far north, her rescue of the kidnapped children at Bolvangar, her escape via hot-air balloon, and her crucial role in Lord Asriel s ambitions to build a bridge to another world.” — ONIX Annotations

“The Way of the Hive: A Honey Bee’s Story” by Jay Hosler — “Graphic novel fans, lovers of nonfiction, budding ecologists, and readers looking for their next great obsession will be buzzing around this title for years to come.” — Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“This Place: 150 Years Retold” by various authors — “Ambitious in scope and strong in execution, this collection succeeds in prompting readers to remember (or learn) Indigenous history “Elisa Gall The Horn Book Magazine

“Tom’s Midnight Garden: A Graphic Adaption of the Philippa Pearce Classic” by Edith — ““[Edith’s] fine-lined figures, sketchy shading, stylish shapes, and muted palette of natural tones balance a modern look with the old-fashioned story. Perfect for fans of time-travel adventures or fantasies with a  smidgen of historical fiction.” — Booklist

“Treasure in the Lake” by Jason Pamment — “This story is astonishing enough to leave people speechless.” — Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

JUVENILE NON-FICTION

“Design like Nature: Biomimicry for a Healthy Planet” by Megan Clendenan —
“The approachable text, supported by lots of captioned photos, spotlights some of nature’s more remarkable innovations and some engineering feats inspired by nature.” ― The Horn Book

“Mad for Ads: How Advertising Gets (and Stays) in Our Heads” by Erica Fyvie — “This upbeat, up-to-date look at advertising helps young readers understand just how insidious marketing can be.” ―Booklist

“Master of Disguise; Camouflaging Creatures & Magnificent Mimics” by Marc Martin — “Martin highlights the lives and disguises of one dozen animals hailing from habitats from every continent but Antarctica, with camouflaged-animal searches. Captivating watercolor art immediately draws you in. . . Both art and text enhance scientific accuracy with beauty and playfulness—a rare feat. Sturdy pages, too. Do not hide this book!”
Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“Our World Out of Balance: Understanding Climate Change and What We Can Do” by Andrea Minogloi — “A great starting place to understand climate change and its effects.” Booklist

“Out of the Blue: How Animals Evolved from Prehistoric Seas” by Elizabeth Shreeve — “This short book guides the reader from the beginnings of life eons ago through to the present day, beginning with an Earth devoid of life and following water-dwelling, single-celled creatures that develop and change as they move “out of the blue” and onto land. The text explains the adaptations that were necessary for animals to live out of the water, as well as how some animals survived (and how others didn’t) during the several extinction events that Earth has suffered.” —School Library Connection

Pearl Harbor” by Kate Messner — “Kate Messner serves up fun, fast history for kids who want the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth. Absolutely smashing!” —Candace Fleming, award-wining author

Pie for Breakfast: A Baking Book for Children” by Cynthia Cliff — “A beautifully illustrated baking book for children featuring recipes for delicious treats along with a powerful message about family, diversity, and helping others.” — Random House, Inc.

“Rescuing Titanic” by Flora Delargy — “This gorgeously illustrated tale of heroes and hope amid one of the most well-known marine tragedies of all time is a must buy for collections serving curious readers of all ages fascinated by the Titanic.”  ―Emily Beasley, Omaha Public Sch., NE, School Library Journal, starred review

Stamped (for Kids): Racism: Antiracism and You” by Sonja Cherry-Paul — “Readers who want to truly understand how deeply embedded racism is in the very fabric of the U.S., its history, and its systems will come away educated and enlightened. Worthy of inclusion in every home and in curricula and libraries everywhere. Impressive and much needed.”―Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“The American Revolution” by Keat Messner — “Critical, respectful, engaging: exemplary history for children.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“The Guide to Woodworking with Kids: Craft Projects to Develop the Lifelong Skills of Young Makers” by Doug Stowe –“… This comprehensive guide offers step by step instruction for teachers, parents and grandparents to offer safe woodworking opportunities to their students and kiddos as a way of developing a wide range of valuable life-skills. … The Guide to Woodworking with Kids is more than a woodworking book, it’s gives parents, grandparents and teachers the confidence, encouragement, and the insight needed to safely engage children in life-enhancing creative arts.” — ONIX annotations

The People Remember” by Ibi Aanu Zoboi — “This immaculately illustrated picture book walks through a vast swath of history… Zoboi’s poetic retrospective breathes life into Black history narratives and reverently celebrates Black lives.” — Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

YOUNG ADULT FICTION

“Call Me Athena: Girl from Detroit” by Colby Cedar Smith — “This story of an immigrant girl growing up in Detroit in the 1930s hits every mark. Woven into the story are her parents’ histories and all the love and loss the family has faced. It will tug your heartstrings.” — (American Booksellers Association)

“Defy the Night” by Brigid Kemmerer — “The slow-burn romance-between an idealist with straightforward moral beliefs and a pragmatist trapped by duty-will keep the pages turning, as will the scheming of the king’s consuls and the rebellion brewing in the background . . . . The personal and the political intertwine in this engaging series opener.” ―Kirkus Reviews

Lobizona” by Romina Garber — “In a timely work of magical realism featuring references to Borges and Garcia Márquez, Garber tackles issues of nationalism, identity, and belonging…This layered novel blends languages and cultures to create a narrative that celebrates perseverance.” – PUBLISHERS WEEKLY (Starred Review)

Me (Moth)” by Amber McBride — “This searing debut novel-in-verse is told from the perspective of Moth, a Black teen whose life changed forever the day a car crash killed her family. … Each free verse poem is tightly composed, leading into the next for a poignant and richly layered narrative. The story builds softly and subtly to a perfect, bittersweet ending. Fans of Jacqueline Woodson won’t be able to put this one down.”―School Library Journal, starred review

On the Come Up” by Angie Thomas — “With sharp, even piercing, characterization, this indelible and intricate story of a young girl who is brilliant and sometimes reckless, who is deeply loved and rightfully angry at a world that reduces her to less than her big dreams call her to be, provides many pathways for readers.” — Horn Book (starred review)

The Dead and the Dark” by Courtney Gould — “Gould’s supernaturally spooky debut is filled with all manner of creepy inventiveness…an intriguing read.” – Publishers Weekly

“The Last Legacy” by Adrienne Young — “In this sumptuously rendered historical novel, Young deftly explores concepts of family, loyalty, and growing into one’s destiny.” – Publishers Weekly

“The Dead and the Dark” by Courtney Gould — “Gould’s supernaturally spooky debut is filled with all manner of creepy inventiveness…an intriguing read.” – Publishers Weekly by Charlotte Nicole Davis

“The Wild Ones: A Broken Anthem for a Girl Nation” by Nafiza Azad — “A powerful feminist account of sisterhood, the longevity of pain, and the reclamation of power.” ― Kirkus Reviews

There Will Come a Darkness” by Katy Rose Pool — “[S]et apart by its immersive worldbuilding and compelling narrators.” ―Shelf Awareness, STARRED review

YOUNG ADULT NON-FICTION

I Will Always Write Back: How One Letter Changed Two Lives” by Caitlin Alifirenka — “The remarkable tenacity of these two souls pulled like magnets across the world by their opposite polarities – one committed to helping, the other to surviving – is deeply affecting…It’s quite a little miracle of unexpected genuineness.”―New York Times Book Review

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

A Girl Called Echo” by Katherena Vermette — “Henderson’s realistic art and perfect pacing, particularly in the pages of wordless panels depicting Echo’s daily routine, highlight her silent nature and hint at the source of her unspoken sadness. Solitary teens are likely to strongly identify with Echo and look forward to more of her adventures. ― Booklist

“Nubia: The Real One” by L. L. McKinney — “… with endearing and expressive art by Robyn Smith, comes a vital story for today about equality, identity, and kicking it with your squad.” — Amazon.com

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – SEPTEMBER 2021

ADULT FICTION

“Beautiful World, Where Are You” by Sally Rooney — “A cool, captivating story . . . Rooney establishes a distance from her characters’ inner lives, creating a sense of privacy even as she describes Alice and Eileen’s most intimate moments. It’s a bold change to her style, and it makes the illuminations all the more powerful when they pop. As always, Rooney challenges and inspires.” — Publishers Weekly (Starred)

“Bewilderment” by Richard Powers — “Powers succeeds in engaging both head and heart. And through its central story of bereavement, this novel of parenting and the environment becomes a multifaceted exploration of mortality.”― The Economist

“Billy Summers” by Stephen King — “[A] tripwire-taut thriller… King meticulously lays out the details of Billy’s trade, his Houdini-style escapes, and his act to look simpler than he is, but the novel’s main strength is a story within a story… This is another outstanding outing from a writer who consistently delivers more than his readers expect.” Publisher’s Weekly, starred

“Black Ice” by Brad Thor — “We get to see Brad Thor at his best with action sequences that will literally chill readers while simultaneously taking their breath away. Scot Harvath is the hero we need.” ― Bookreporter

“Bolla” by Pajtim Statovci — “Astounding writing distinguishes this portrait of love, loss, and war . . . [Bolla is] an eloquent story of desire and displacement, a melancholy symphony in a heartbreaking minor key. Statovci is a master.”Publishers Weekly, starred

“Damnation Springs” by Ash Davidson — “Davidson’s impressive debut chronicles life in a working-class community so thoroughly that the reader feels the characters’ anguish as they’re divided over environmental concerns that threaten their lives and livelihoods….The depiction of ordinary people trapped by circumstances beyond their control makes for a heart-wrenching modern American tragedy.”Publisher’s Weekly

“Hello, Summer” by Mary Kay Andrews — “Andrews can be counted on for beach-worthy depictions of southern women with chutzpah and a talent for finding trouble with humor and romantic interest mixed in. Fans of Elin Hilderbrand and Kristy Woodson Harvey shouldn’t miss it.” Booklist

“Matrix” by Lauren Groff — “Just when it seems there are nothing but chronicles of decline and ruin comes Lauren Groff’s Matrix, about a self-sufficient abbey of 12th-century nuns—a shining, all-female utopian community…  it is finally its spirit of celebration that gives this novel its many moments of beauty.” Wall Street Journal

“Nine Lives” by Danielle Steel — A woman who longs to avoid risk at all cost learns that men who love danger are the most exciting in this moving novel from New York Times bestselling author Danielle Steel. — Amazon.com

“Songbirds” by Christy Lefteri — “In this heartfelt novel by the author of The Beekeeper of Aleppo, a Sri Lankan domestic worker goes missing from her employer’s home in Cyprus, and the widowed homeowner herself sets out to find her after the police show no interest.”The New York Times (New and Noteworthy)

“Sunflower Sisters” by Martha Hall Kelly — “A well-researched, realistic narrative . . . It’s the women and their activism that tell the story of the struggle to end slavery. They become the real heroes of the war. Kelly tells this story without either romanticizing or sweeping over the horrors that split the nation in the nineteenth century and continues to do so today.”The Spokesman-Review

“The Alice Network” by Kate Quinn — “…In an enthralling new historical novel from national bestselling author Kate Quinn, two women ― a female spy recruited to the real-life Alice Network in France during World War I and an unconventional American socialite searching for her cousin in 1947 ― are brought together in a mesmerizing story of courage and redemption.” — Amazon.com

“The Cellist” by Daniel Silva — “The pace of The Cel­list never slack­ens as its ac­tion vol­leys from Zurich to Tel Aviv to Paris and be­yond. Mr. Silva tells his story with zest, wit and su­perb tim­ing, and he en­gi­neers enough sur­prises to star­tle even the most at­ten­tive reader.”  — Wall Street Journal

“The Forest of Vanishing Stars” by Kristen Harmel — “In this always compelling, sometimes harrowing tale, THE FOREST OF VANISHING STARS draws readers into a singular story of survival and bravery. Set against the backdrop of Eastern Europe during World War II, the resourceful Yona, forced to become expert in the ways of the forest when a sage, prescient elderly woman takes Yona from her German family, must decide whether she’ll rise up to claim the destiny foretold about her when faced with a band of Jewish refugees hiding in her beloved woods.Inspiring and gripping.” — New York Times bestselling author Marie Benedict

“The Ghost Clause” by Howard Norman — “…he has a keen eye for the way loss uneasily sticks with those left behind. What opens as a ghost story turns out to be something of a love story instead…he still has a knack for finding emotional resonances in muted, unlikely scenarios.” Kirkus 

“We Germans” by Alexander Starritt — “A thoughtful, unsettling chronicle… Starritt’s gritty depictions of the horrors of war and the moral choices faced by soldiers add intensity to the ruminations on courage. This is a fascinatingly enigmatic addition to the literature of Germany’s coming to terms with the past.”―Publishers Weekly

ADULT MYSTERY

“Dead by Dawn” by Paul Dorion — “Part survival story, part mystery-suspense, Doiron’s narrative is fast-paced and engaging.”Library Journal

“The Bounty” by Janet Evanovich with Steve Hamilton — The dynamic, often-humorous storytelling won’t let readers out of its grip, and there’s a compelling romantic subplot, to boot. Fans of Evanovich won’t need any convincing here, but also offer this one to fans of The Da Vinci Code, as ancient symbols and academic sleuthing play a strong part in the unraveling of the mystery.”—Booklist (starred review)

“The Finders” by Jeffrey B. Burton — “Action-packed…an intense, graphic serial killer novel with a likable, aw-shucks hero and a remarkable dog.”–Library Journal (starred review)

“The Keepers” by Jeffrey B. Burton — “The follow-up to The Finders sets a relentless pace. Corrupt politicians, the mob, a brutal killer, and a shocking death combine in a fast-paced story of an ordinary man and his extraordinary dogs.”―Library Journal (starred review)

“The Madness of Crowds” by Louise Penny — “Provocative… brilliant… Seamlessly integrating debates about scientific experimentation and morality into a fair-play puzzle, Penny excels at placing her characters in challenging ethical quandaries. This author just goes from strength to strength.” ―Publishers Weekly (Starred Review)

“Trojan Horse” by S. Lee Manning — “Continues the experiences of Jamie, who in 1830 after escaping slavery passes himself off as a wealthy white silversmith, only to risk everything to save a beloved servant who has been captured and sold in the South.” — Annotation

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“Born a Crime: Stories from South African Childhood” by Trevor Noah — “[Noah’s] electrifying memoir sparkles with funny stories . . . and his candid and compassionate essays deepen our perception of the complexities of race, gender, and class.”Booklist (starred review)

“Joe Biden: The Life, the Run and What Matters Now” by Evan Osnos — “Evan Osnos reveals how Biden’s trials and tribulations have forged in him an uncommon empathy. The President-elect emerges as a man uniquely qualified to lead America through the next four challenging years.” Detroit Free Press

“Ladyparts” by Deborah Copaken — “Ladyparts is a first-rate example of the contemporary memoir, harrowing, sad, funny, revelatory, true. Were you to misconstrue the title, you might think this was all simply anatomy, which would be fine, but as with all the best memoirs what this work really anatomizes is how it all feels–in the mind, in the soul, and in the nick of time. Copaken’s memoir is poignant, necessary, and very rewarding.”
—Rick Moody, award-winning author of The Ice Storm and The Long Accomplishment

“Racing the Clock: Running Across a Lifetime” by Bernd Heinrich — “Passionate meditations on the pleasures and pains of a lifetime of running, with greatest appeal to fellow runners.” — Kirkus Reviews

ADULT NON-FICTION

“Afghanistan Papers: A Secret History” by Craig Whitlock — U.S. government and military officials took part in an “unspoken conspiracy to mask the truth” about the war in Afghanistan, according to this searing chronicle. … Whitlock paints a devastating portrait of how public messaging about the conflict consistently belied the reality on the ground. He details internal rivalries in the White House, the Pentagon, and the State Department, and the fatigue and pessimism of soldiers on the front lines. …A costly program to eradicate opium poppy fields in Helmand province backfired spectacularly, turning the region into a “lethal stronghold for the insurgency” and earning harsh criticism from veteran diplomat Richard Holbrooke and others. Whitlock also delves into the 2011 killing of Osama bin Laden, the Obama administration’s skewing of statistics to support its war strategy, evidence of Afghan government corruption, and the Trump administration’s complex peace plan with the Taliban. Rigorously detailed and relentlessly pessimistic, this is a heartbreaking look at how America’s leaders “chose to bury their mistakes and let the war drift.” — PUBLISHERS WEEKLY,

“Blue: In Search of Nature’s Rarest Color” by Kai Kupferschmidt — “In readily accessible prose, Kupferschmidt, an experienced science reporter, walks readers through intricate material in chapters that describe blue in stones, vision, plants, language, and animals. . . . The complexities are laid out with wonderful diagrams and illustrations in an engaging and approachable manner. . . . Blue is charming and readable.”Booklist

“Further Beyond: The Poetry of R. Sheldon Shay” by R. Sheldon Shay

“Fuzz: When Nature Breaks the Law” by Mary Roach — “This book is such a rich stew of anecdotes and lore that it’s best savored slowly, bit by bit… No matter the situation, Roach approaches it with contagious enthusiasm.”
Alice Cary, BookPage (starred review)

“House Planted: Choosing, Growing and Styling the Perfect Plants for Your Space” by Liza Munoz — Green up your living space with this bright, fresh, stylish introduction to choosing, caring for, and designing with houseplants. … In House Planted, interior plant designer Lisa Muñoz guides you step by step and room by room through picking the perfect plant for the perfect spot and incorporating plants into your indoor decor….There are creative ideas for displaying plants, tips on caring for your new leafy friends, and primers on potting and troubleshooting.” — ONIX Annotations

“How the World is Passed: A Reckoning With the History of Slavery Across America” by Clint Smith — “Both an honoring and an exposé of slavery’s legacy in America and how this nation is built upon the experiences, blood, sweat and tears of the formerly enslaved.”―The Root

“I Alone Can Fix It: Donald J. Trump’s Catastrophic Final Year” by Carol Leonnig and Philip Rucker — “Incisive, dramatic and masterful . . . Leonnig and Rucker capture it all. Just when we think, in absorbing these horrific events of the transfer of power to Joe Biden, that we can’t be shocked any morewe are. The tumult is raw and real and ugly. The Trump Oval Office is a place defiled. As they showed us previously, their reporting is as authoritative and seamless as the legends they have now succeededBob Woodward and Carl Bernsteinunder the shield of the venerable Post.” The Sydney Morning Herald

“Kindred: Neanderthal Life, Love, Death and Art” by Rebecca Wragg Sykes — “[T]hrough painstaking forensic analysis of an eclectic collection of fragmented artifacts, and in a manner at times achieving the suspense and excitement of a Hollywood thriller, Ms. Wragg Sykes makes a bold and magnificent attempt to resurrect our Neanderthal kin.” ―The Wall Street Journal

“Let’s Make Dumplings!: A Comic Book Cookbook” by Hugo Amano — “This terrific book is perfect for anyone obsessed with stuffed doughy morsels!”—Andrea Nguyen, James Beard Award–winning author, The Pho Cookbook and Asian Dumplings

“Nature’s Best Hope: A New Approach to Conservation That Starts In Your Yard” by Douglas W. Tallamy — “To support conservation efforts, you need look no farther than your own backyard… Nature’s Best Hope offers practical tips for creating habitat that protects and nurtures nature.” —National Geographic

“No Spring Chicken: Stories and Advice from a Wild Handicapper on Aging and Disability” by Francine Falk-Allen — “Part of her book is designed to encourage all of her readers―disabled or not―to go out and explore the wider world, hence the amount of practical advice in these pages… She looks squarely at the additional challenges handicapped people face when traveling and offers exuberant encouragement. A fun, spirited book…” Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Power Play: Tesla, Elon Musk and the Bet of the Century” by Tim Higgins — “[Power Play] eschews sensationalism for a high-resolution portrait of how exactly an unusual man and an unusual company managed a meteoric rise…. The tale of Tesla’s ascent is inherently dramatic and compellingly told.” —NPR.org

“Test Gods: Virgin Galactic and the Making of a Modern Astronaut” by Nicholas Schmidle — “A riveting account of the underreported commercial space race, which has up until now lacked a worthy storyteller…The sections of the book that narrate how Virgin Galactic gets to space are replete with white-knuckled descriptions of booster rockets, pilots braving the ‘transonic zone,’ everything you’d hope to read were Mailer or Wolfe alive today to tell the tale…[a] deeply reported and deeply personal book. It is a masterly work, a reminder of what should inspire us all.” The New York Times Book Review

“The Age of Surveillance Capitalism: The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power” by Shoshana Zuboff — “A definitive, stunning analysis of how digital giants like Google, Facebook, etc. have single-mindedly pursued data on human behavior as fodder for generating predictions and shaping outcomes salable to advertisers and others…The scope of her analysis is extraordinary; in addition to covering philosophical, social, and political implications she discusses needed privacy regulation…This book is pathbreaking, illuminating, and unnerving.”―CHOICE

“This Is Your Mind on Plants” by Michael Pollan — “Delightful . . . [This Is Your Mind On Plants] aims to collapse the distinctions between legal and illegal, medical and recreational, exotic and everyday, by appealing to the principle that unites the three: the affinities between plant biochemistry and the human mind.” —New York Review of Books

PARENTING

“8 Great Smarts: Discover and Nurture Your Child’s Intelligences” by Kathy Koch — Do you wish your child could see how smart he or she is?

Find hope in 8 Great Smarts. You’ll be empowered and equipped with new language and creative ideas for how to:

  • Accept and affirm your child’s unique smarts
  • Motivate your child to learn and study with all 8 smarts
  • Reawaken any “paralyzed” smarts
  • Redirect misbehavior in new, constructive ways
  • Guide your child spiritually, relationally, and to a good career fit” — Amazon.com

PICTURE BOOKS

“A Map Into the World” by Kao Kalia Yang
“Areli Is a Dreamer” by Areli Morales
“Green on Green” by Dianne White
“How to Write a Story” by Kate Messner
“If You Go Down to the Woods Today” by Rachel Piercey
“Jenny Mei is Sad” by Tracy Subisak
“Julian At the Wedding” by Jessica Love
“Love is Powerful” by Heather Dean Brewer
“Made by Hand: A Crafts Sampler” by Carole Lexa Schaefer
“Night Walk to the Sea” by Deborah Wiles
“On the Trapline” by David Robertson
“Outside, Inside” by LeUyen Pham
“Sleep Tight Farm: A Farm Prepares for Winter” by Eugenia Doyle
“The Night Walk” by Marie Dorleans
“The Old Truck” by Jarrett Pumphrey
“The Tree Guardian” by Lea Vis
“The Water Lady: How Darlene Arviso Helps a Thirsty Navajo Nation” by Alice B. McGinty
“Titan and the Wild Boars: The True Cave Rescue of the Thai Soccer Team” by Susan Hood
“Usha and the Stolen Sun” by Bree Galbraith
“What’s Cooking at 10 Garden Street?” by Felicita Sala
Wild is the Wind” by Grahame Baker-Smith
“Wishes” by Muon Van
“Wonder Walkers” by Micha Archer

JUVENILE FICTION

“A Good Kind of Trouble” by Lisa Moore Ramee — “Shayla navigates the world of middle school and the troubled world beyond with wit and endless heart. A timely, funny, and unforgettable debut about friendship, facing your fears, and standing up for what’s right.” — Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

JUVENILE NON-FICTION

“Amazing Science: 83 Hands on S.T.E.A.M. Experiments for Curious Kids!” by Aubre Andrus —  “…incredibly engaging….Readers will turn their kitchens into laboratories to practice the scientific method, collect data, test hypotheses, and have so much fun getting their hands messy as they explore food science, water, energy, motion, games, slime, grime, and the great outdoors…. Amazing Science is fun for parents and kids alike, who will all appreciate learning and enjoying time together along the way.” — Booklist, starred review

“Monarch Butterflies: Explore the Life Journey of One of the Winged Wonders of the World” by Anne Hobbie — “Monarchs are a favorite and familiar North American butterfly, and their incredible annual migration has captured the popular imagination for generations. As populations of monarchs decline dramatically due to habitat loss and climate change, interest in and enthusiasm for protecting these beloved pollinators has skyrocketed. With easy-to-read text and colorful, engaging illustrations, Monarch Butterflies presents young readers with rich, detailed information about the monarchs’ life cycle, anatomy, and the wonders of their signature migration, as well as how to raise monarchs at home and the cultural significance of monarchs in Day of the Dead celebrations. As the book considers how human behavior has harmed monarchs, it offers substantive ways kids can help make a positive difference. Children will learn how to turn lawns into native plant gardens, become involved in citizen science efforts such as tagging migrating monarchs and participating in population counts, and support organizations that work to conserve butterflies.” — ONIX annotations

“Out of the Blue: How Animals Evolved from Prehistoric Seas” by Elizabeth Shreeve — “This short book guides the reader from the beginnings of life eons ago through to the present day, beginning with an Earth devoid of life and following water-dwelling, single-celled creatures that develop and change as they move “out of the blue” and onto land. The text explains the adaptations that were necessary for animals to live out of the water, as well as how some animals survived (and how others didn’t) during the several extinction events that Earth has suffered.” —School Library Connection

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

“Orange: The Complete Collection” by Ichigo Takano — “Orange: The Complete Collection is a romantic comedy manga series by shoujo author and artist Ichigo Takano. This critically-lauded manga series will tug at your heartstrings with its central plot device about time travel and communication with a future self.” — McMillan Palgrave

Categories
Coronavirus Fun Links News

On Line Resources

Resources that Patrons Can Access Remotely

Resources provided by the Vermont Department of Libraries to All Public Libraries:

Universal Class

More than 500 online classes ranging in topics from writing skills, software programs (including Adobe and Microsoft programs), to science, html, and graphic design. There’s something for everyone! Though classes are not for college credit, they are led by a real instructor with whom you can communicate by e-mail. Courses allow you to proceed at your own pace, working on assignments anytime, day or night.

Access – Go to Universal Class and use your library card number to login and create an account.

Learning Express

Learning Express library is a deep and broad tool that has something for everyone! It covers elementary school homework help, prep for the Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) exam, nursing and medical testing prep, job interview and resume writing, computer skills, SAT, LSAT, and GRE test prep, to interactive tools to help someone choose a career. It can help someone choose a pathway in life or provide the tools to get a better job.

Access – Go to the Learning Express Library Click on Sign /In Register in the upper right corner. Click on New User to start New User Registration. Your institution (Greensboro Free Library) will already be filled out. Fill in the rest of the form and click Register at the bottom of the page. Thereafter you will sign in with the user name (your email address) and password you entered.

Vermont Online Library

Covering everything from newspaper articles to DIY car repair, the Vermont Online Library  (VOL) can help with any topic. Available for free to all Vermonters, VOL has options for all ages from elementary school through adult. You can even use it to read current articles from the NY Times, Washington Post, the Economist, and more.

Access – Use the Vermont Online Library your library’s website. It will ask if you share your location; if not, login with your library card number or a password (ask library staff).

Free Resources:

The Daily Hazen Link

Learn about what’s happening at Hazen Union at The Daily Hazen Link. This link also gives you teacher’s weekly class plans, ideas on what to do while school is closed and when students can pick up meals.

Internet Archive

Internet Archive is a non-profit digital library offering free universal access to books, movies & music, as well as 418 billion archived web pages.

Access – Go to Internet Archive

Project Gutenberg

The site offers thousands of public domain ebooks for free use on any device. Because they are public domain, they are typically limited to items published before 1924, but that still includes a wide range of classics.

Access – Go to Project Gutenberg and download free ebooks in a variety of formats

LibriVox

This site offers public domain audiobooks recorded by volunteers for free use on any relevant device. Like Gutenberg, they tend to be items published before 1924.

Access – Go to LibriVox and download free audiobooks.

TumbleBooks

This site offers is a collection of animated talking picture books, read-alongs, ebooks, quizzes, lesson plans, and educational games. They recently announced its online products would be available for free to all public libraries until at least August 31.

Access go to
www.TumbleBook Library.com for K-6 children’s ebook database
Username: tumble735 Password: books

https://www.TumbleMath.com for K-6 math ebook database Username: tumble2020 Password: A3b5c6

https://TeenBookCloud.com for gr 7-12 ebook database
Username: tumble2020 Password: A3b5c6

www.AudioBookCloud.com for all ages audio book database
Username: rumble2020 Password: A3b5c6

https://www.RomanceBookCloud.com – a huge collection of steamy Romance novels for the older crowd!
Username: rumble2020 Password: A3b5c6

FamilySearch

This free genealogy site allows users to search for information, create a family tree, and pull records from their extensive database.

Access – Go to FamilySearch

Available through some Public Libraries (Please contact your local library for availability):

RB Digital

RB Digital allows you to check out ebooks and digital audiobooks to your phone, tablet, or other drive. Just like print books, there’s a checkout period, and only one person can have a book at a time.

Access – Install the RB Digital app, or go to https://vermontstate.rbdigital.com/ . You’ll need your library card number to enter a username and password when setting up your account. Call the library (802-533-2531 for your username which is your library card number.

Hazen Daily Link

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – MAY 2014

ADULT FICTION

“Americanah” by Chimamanda Adichid – “…Americanah, tells the story of Ifemelu, a confident, beautiful Nigerian who immigrates to America. In her new home, Ifemelu struggles to adapt and to survive financially. But she makes it through college, starts an acclaimed blog about race, and wins a fellowship to Princeton. All the while she’s haunted by memories of her former boyfriend, Obinze. Soft-spoken and introverted, Obinze immigrates to London where he ekes out an uncertain existence before being deported. Back home, he becomes wealthy as a property developer. When Ifemelu returns to Nigeria, her old feelings for him are revived, and the pair find themselves in the grip of passion. Both are forced to make difficult decisions about the future. Adichie’s dramatic, sweeping narrative functions as an emotionally riveting love story, as a profound meditation on race and as a revealing exploration of the immigrant experience. It succeeds–beautifully–on every level. ” –Julie Hale. 608pg. BOOKPAGE, c2014.

“Auschwitz Escape” by Joel C. Rosenberg – “The strong religious conviction evident in Rosenberg’s previous novels (Damascus Countdown), which were focused on the Middle East and Muslim-Western relations, is reflected in his latest book–a work of historical fiction, about a heroic escape from the Nazis. Luc, a French pastor, who is sentenced to the Auschwitz death camp for helping Jews, joins forces with Jacob, a Jewish man sent to the camp after his attempt to hijack a train bound for Auschwitz fails. Together they plan to escape to tell an unbelieving world about the Holocaust. During the escape, the two form a strong bond, learning about each other’s faith and doubts. When Jacob questions why Luc has joined the Resistance, the pastor responds, “The real question is ‘Why aren’t all the Christians here?’ ” Rosenberg has done what he does best: create believable characters set in a political milieu and also in religious context, acting on conviction or exploiting religion for selfish or evil ends. This is Rosenberg’s most deeply moving work to date.”  — Agent: Scott Miller, Trident Media Group. (Mar.). 484p. PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, c2014.

“Claire of the Sea Light” by Edwidge Danticat – “In interlocking stories moving back and forth in time, Danticat weaves a beautifully rendered portrait of longing in the small fishing town of Ville Rose in Haiti. Seven-year-old Claire Faustin’s mother died giving birth to her. Each year, her father, Nozias, feels the wrenching need to earn more money than poor Ville Rose can provide and to find someone to care for Claire. Gaelle Lavaud, a fabric shop owner, is a possible mother for the orphaned child, but she is haunted by her own tragic losses. Bernard, who longs to be a journalist and create a radio show that reflects the gang violence of his neighborhood, is caught in the violence himself. Max Junior returns from Miami on a surreptitious mission to visit the girl he impregnated and left years ago and to remember an unrequited love. Louise George, the raspy voice behind a gossipy radio program, is having an affair with Max Senior, head of the local school, and teaches the ethereally beautiful Claire. Their stories and their lives flow beautifully one into another, all rendered in the luminous prose for which Danticat is known.” — Bush, Vanessa. 256p. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2013.

“Night Broken” by Patricia Briggs – “In the winning eighth urban fantasy (after Frost Burned) featuring coyote shapeshifter and car mechanic Mercy Thompson, Briggs adds Canary Islands mythology and garden-variety jealousy. Mercy is mated to Adam, the Alpha of the Tri-Cities werewolves. Adam’s human ex-wife, Christy, seeks refuge with the pack to evade a dangerous stalker: volcano god Guayota. She soon begins playing on the sympathy of others to undermine Mercy’s place in the pack. At the same time, a dangerous Gray Lord of the Fae sets a deadline for Mercy to return the walking stick she previously borrowed from the Fae and entrusted into the elusive Coyote’s care. Between visits to imprisoned prophet Gary Laughingdog, whose importance grows along with the story, Mercy must fend off Guayota, who has pyrotechnic abilities and frightening red-eyed attack dogs. Briggs continues to surprise and intrigue readers with Mercy’s inventiveness and intuition under duress.” — Agent: Linn Prentis, Linn Prentiss Literary. (Mar.). 352p. PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, c2014.

“The Way of Kings” by Brandon Sanderson – “Centuries have passed since the Radiant Knights protected the world of Roshar from the evil of the Desolation. Their heroic deeds have long been overshadowed by stories of their betrayal, which in turn have faded into myth. The nation of Alethkar has been mired in a war to avenge the assassination of its king. The system of power used by the Radiant Knights is largely misunderstood and untapped, and yet an ancient evil stirs. Sanderson… creates an interesting world with a novel system of magic, but the best part of this series launch is the compelling, complex story of Dalinar, Kaladin, and Shallan as they struggle through emotional, physical, and moral challenges. Verdict Sanderson is a master of hooking the reader in the first few pages, and once again he doesn’t disappoint. ” — William Baer, Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta. 1008pg. LJ Xpress Online Review. LIBRARY JOURNAL, c2010.

“William Shakespeare’s The Empire Striketh Back” by Ian Doescher – “The saga that began with the interstellar best seller William Shakespeare’s Star Wars continues with this merry reimagining of George Lucas’s enduring classic The Empire Strikes Back.

Many a fortnight have passed since the destruction of the Death Star. Young Luke Skywalker and his friends have taken refuge on the ice planet of Hoth, where the evil Darth Vader has hatched a cold-blooded plan to capture them. Only with the help of a little green Jedi Master—and a swaggering rascal named Lando Calrissian—can our heroes escape the Empire’s wrath. And only then will Lord Vader learn how sharper than a tauntaun’s tooth it is to have a Jedi child.

What light through Yoda’s window breaks? Methinks you’ll find out in the pages of The Empire Striketh Back!” — Amazon.com

“Winter Ready: Poems” by Leland Kinsey – “Winter Ready is a 96-page collection of new poems by a Vermont-based writer who draws from his impressive repertoire of observations and physical landscape of the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont to bring to the reader poems with universal meaning and at times a painful acuity. Kinsey opens the collection perched up high on the chimney top, working and observing his surroundings, and throughout the book, he never really gets down-he chronicles a people and a place and a time-and keeps the hard work of writing poetry hidden in the seeming effortless verse that is often funny and poignant, yet always sharp and clear. In this new collection by a renowned Vermont poet, the setting is the same, but the voice rings true to the people and the land they inhabit, always respectful of the native peoples who came before and the awesome power of a glacier that carved a path in its wake. These poems evoke a fully realized view of the world the poet inhabits, an awareness of labor and its changing nature. The book moves through poem after glowing poem, evoking natural history, flora and fauna, with a place-based and focused attention.” — Baker & Taylor

“Words of Radiance” by Brandon Sanderson “The readers of Sanderson’s The Way of Kings (2010) may have been waiting for him to return to the Stormlight Archives… The world of Roshar is still very close to being a character in its own right (one thinks of Dune), as Sanderson has used the room afforded by a book of this size to build it in loving detail, including the fierce storms that make civilized life difficult even in peacetime. But the humans and the humanoid Parshendi are still fighting, although Brightlord Kholin is leading an army deep into enemy territory. His sister, Jasnah, is with him, seeking a legendary lost city that her student, Shallan, believes may hold the key to victory. Far below the level of the high command, the rising young slave warrior, Kaladin, learns that the Parshendi have a counterstrategy in preparation, one that portends the destruction of the world unless he can become the founder of a new order of the legendary Knights Radiant. Many readers will find Shallan and Kaladin the most absorbing of the major characters because they have the most to lose, but the characterization is on the whole as meticulous as the world-building. A very impressive continuation.” — Green, Roland. 1090p. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2014.

MYSTERY

 “Almost Criminal” by E. R. Brown – “Tate MacLane is too smart for his own good, a sort of misguided prodigy. Prematurely graduated from high school, he was tossed out of university (“socialization issues”). Now 17, he’s working at a coffee shop in Wallace, British Columbia, a “hopeless corner of nowhere,” and dreaming of finding a way to get back to Vancouver and back to school. Along comes Randle Kennedy, a marijuana grower. Until the drug is legalized, he’s growing medical weed, and the Canadian cops tend to be lenient if they know you’re in the medicinal side of the business. But make no mistake: Randle’s a drug dealer. And young Tate is now working for him. When Tate discovers the truth about the life he’s wandered into, he knows it will take more than his keen intellect to get him out safely. Tate is a fresh narrative voice, and Randle, who could have been a fairly stereotypical drug-dealing villain, has surprising depth; he’s even a weird sort of father figure for young Tate. If you took a gritty crime novel and a coming-of-age story and squashed them together, you might get something very close to this fine book.” — Pitt, David. 296p. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2013.

“City of Darkness and Light” by Rhys Bowen – “It’s lucky number 13 for this lively addition to the award-winning Molly Murphy series. After their New York home is bombed, police captain Daniel Sullivan packs wife Molly and young son Liam off to Paris to stay with friends. Newly retired from the detective business, Molly lands in the middle of another mystery when her expat hosts aren’t in their Paris apartment to receive her. Her only clue to their whereabouts is a recent letter that mentions a pending introduction to the artist Reynold Bryce. But, quelle horreur, Bryce has just been murdered! Inquiring of artists in turn-of-the-century Paris, Molly meets Pablo Picasso, Gertrude Stein, Mary Cassatt, and Edgar Degas. (All while finding trustworthy child care for her still-nursing son and getting up to speed on the Dreyfus affair.) Molly is a smart, feisty heroine who admirably defends her investigation to a very skeptical Surete. Though placed a decade or so earlier, this breezy historical mystery will appeal to fans of Carola Dunn’s Daisy Dalrymple and Jacqueline Winspear’s Maisie Dobbs.” — Keefe, Karen. 320p. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2014.

“Fallen Women” by Sandra Dallas – “Dallas plumbs the lives of so-called fallen women in 1885 Denver as she ably reveals the ties, sturdy as well as tenuous, that bind two sisters and test the memory of their relationship after one of them is found murdered in a brothel. When Beret Osmundsen, a wealthy New York socialite, arrives in Denver after she receives the news of her sister Lillie’s death, she believes she is prepared to find the truth. Instead, she is led down a path of lies, treachery, and confusion that threatens to undermine everything she has ever believed in. Detective Mick McCauley helps Beret negotiate the serpentine twists encircling the life and death of the sister Beret realizes she didn’t really know at all. As she forges ahead in her determination to see the truth uncovered and justice served, Beret must deal with scandalized relatives who would love to see the situation entirely disappear, the ugliness so readily displayed by a so-called civilized society, and her own conflicting views and emotions. Sure to be snapped up by era fans as well as Dallas’ loyal readership.” — Trevelyan, Julie. 320p. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2013.

“Frog Music” by Emma Donoghue – “During the scorching summer of 1876, Jenny Bonnet, an enigmatic cross-dressing bicyclist who traps frogs for San Francisco’s restaurants, meets her death in a railroad saloon on the city’s outskirts. Exotic dancer Blanche Beunon, a French immigrant living in Chinatown, thinks she knows who shot her friend and why, but has no leverage to prove it and doesn’t know if she herself was the intended target. A compulsive pleasure-seeker estranged from her “fancy man,” Blanche searches desperately for her missing son while pursuing justice for Jenny, but finds her two goals sit in conflict. In language spiced with musical interludes and raunchy French slang, Donoghue brings to teeming life the nasty, naughty side of this ethnically diverse metropolis, with its brothels, gaming halls, smallpox-infested boardinghouses, and rampant child abuse. Most of her seedy, damaged characters really lived, and she not only posits a clever solution to a historical crime that was never adequately solved but also crafts around Blanche and Jenny an engrossing and suspenseful tale about moral growth, unlikely friendship, and breaking free from the past. ” –Johnson, Sarah. 416pg. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2014.

“Murder in Murray Hill” by Victoria Thompson – “Thompson convincingly portrays late-19th-century New York City in her 16th Gaslight mystery, but she has put her male lead, NYPD Det. Sgt. Frank Malloy, into an awkward spot. Toward the end of the previous entry, 2013’s Murder in Chelsea, Malloy learned that he was going to inherit a fortune. Once word reaches Malloy’s police colleagues of his imminent windfall, he realizes his job is on the line. At police headquarters, Chief O’Brien fires him, saying, “You’re a good man, but millionaires aren’t cops.” Malloy, who was in the midst of a missing-persons case involving women who answered a personal ad in the newspaper, manages to keep his hand in as a private investigator. While Malloy may be on track to follow this new career path in future installments, Thompson will have some work to do to make this scenario plausible.” —  Agent: Nancy Yost, Nancy Yost Literary Agency. (May). 304p. PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, c2014.

“Natchez Burning” by Greg Iles – “Much more than a thriller, Iles’s deftly plotted fourth Penn Cage novel (after 2008’s The Devil’s Punchbowl) doesn’t flag for a moment, despite its length. In 2005, the ghosts of the past come back to haunt Cage–now the mayor of Natchez, Miss.–with a vengeance. His father, Dr. Tom Cage, who has been an institution in the city for decades, faces the prospect of being arrested for murder. An African-American nurse, Viola Turner, who worked closely with Tom in the 1960s and was in the end stages of cancer, has died, and her son, Lincoln, believes that she was eased into death by a lethal injection. Tom refuses to speak about what happened (he admits only that he was treating Viola), which prevents Cage from using his leverage as mayor to head off charges. The mystery is inextricably interwoven with the violence Natchez suffered in the 1960s, including the stabbing of Viola’s brother by Ku Klux Klansmen in a fight. The case may also be connected to the traumatic political assassinations of the decade. This superlative novel’s main strength comes from the lead’s struggle to balance family and honor.”– Agents: Dan Conaway and Simon Lipskar, Writers House. (May). 800p. PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, c2014.

“NYPD Red 2” by James Patterson – “After being called to a horrible crime scene in Central Park involving a brutally murdered woman on a carousel, Zach and Kylie, detectives with the elite NYPD Red, must uncover the killer while public pressure builds and personal and professional secrets hang in the balance.” — Baker and Taylor

“Ripper: A Novel” by Isabel Allende – “Bestseller Allende (The House of the Spirits) successfully tries her hand at a mystery, which features an unlikely team of sleuths united by an online mystery game named after the infamous Whitechapel murderer. High school senior Amanda Martin is the games master for a group that includes her grandfather, Blake Jackson; a wheelchair-bound New Zealand boy with the online persona of a Gypsy girl named Esmeralda; and a 13-year-old boy with a high IQ who calls himself Sherlock Holmes. Amanda persuades her cohorts to investigate real-life crimes in 2012 San Francisco, starting with the murder of Ed Staton, a school security guard. A month earlier, Amanda’s astrologer godmother predicted that San Francisco would suffer a bloodbath. The prophecy seems more credible when other murders follow Staton’s. While this genre outing isn’t as memorable as the author’s more groundbreaking fiction, her facility with plotting and pacing will keep readers turning the pages.” — Agent: Carmen Balcells, Carmen Balcells Agency. (Feb.). 400p. PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, c2013.

BIOGRAPHY

 “Wilson” by A. Scott Berg – “This won’t replace John Milton Cooper Jr.’s superb 2009 biography of the United States’ 28th president (Woodrow Wilson), and one could argue that Berg’s isn’t needed so soon after Cooper’s; other than two caches of papers belonging to Wilson’s daughter Jesse and his physician, nothing significantly new about him has been learned in the past four years. Notwithstanding, Berg … has written a lively, solid book. It’s more digestible than Cooper’s scholarly tome, and Berg does a better job of capturing Wilson’s personality. Before he occupied the Oval Office, Wilson served as president of Princeton; Berg–like Cooper–is an alumnus of the university, and is generally sympathetic to the man (he puts much emphasis on Wilson’s love for his two wives and characterizes him as a passionate lover as well as a determined leader), while taking a more critical stand against his racial views and policies, his handling of the League of Nations, and of the secrecy that surrounded his late-presidency illness. Most importantly, Berg presents Wilson’s failure to win the world over to his post-WWI vision as a personal and national tragedy. He’s right, but Berg’s likening of Wilson’s life to biblical stages is overkill (chapter titles include “Ascension,” “Gethsemane,” etc.). Fortunately, the theme of tragedy–while nothing new–binds the book and lifts it above more conventional biographies.” — Agent: Lynn Nesbit, Janklow & Nesbit Associates. (Sept.). 832p. PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, c2013

ADULT NON-FICTION

“How Many Ways Can You Make Five?: A Parent’s Guide to Exploring Math with Children’s Books” by Sally Anderson – “Explore connections between math and everyday life with your child! The activities in How Many Ways Can You Make Five? link popular children’s books—which you are probably already reading with your child—with easy, fun-filled activities you can use to explore important math concepts like mapping, following directions, noticing patterns, and finding shapes.” — Amazon.com

“Jesus: A Pilgrimage” by James Martin – “Inviting readers of “deep faith or no faith” to meet the Jesus he loves, Martin weaves stories of his Holy Land pilgrimage, undertaken to explore the Gospels, with scholarship, analysis, and personal reflections. The noted Jesuit,… balances faith and reason in the classic Catholic tradition as he ponders the meaning of significant events in Jesus’s life. Martin’s broad knowledge of current academic work informs his imaginative exploration of possible answers. Dismissing the common “rationalizing tendency” toward the Gospels, he emphasizes that Jesus, at once both human and divine, is “not a problem to be solved, but a mystery to be lived.” His commitment to a traditional Christian understanding provides a bracing counterpoint to recent studies of the historical Jesus and non-canonical gospels. Martin communicates a joyful faith in God’s healing and the ultimate hope offered by the Resurrection. Throughout, vivid details of his search in blistering heat for holy sites both authentic and dubious anchor this complex, compelling spiritual testimony. “You’ve met my Jesus,” he concludes. “Now meet your own.” (–  Web-Exclusive Review. PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, c2014.

“On Paper: The Everything of Its Two-Thousand-Year History” by Nicholas Basbanes – “Like silk and gunpowder, paper was invented by the ancient Chinese. In this peripatetic account of all things paper, from the ancients to the present, journalist Basbanes (Every Book Its Reader) follows paper’s trail as it slowly reached the West by way of the Silk Road, arriving in Europe almost 1,000 years after its invention (it didn’t get to England until 1494). But Basbanes isn’t just interested in paper’s conventional and specialized history. His aim is to show how the material has penetrated all aspects of our lives (books, stamps, money, blueprints, packaging, and so on). Each episodic chapter takes the author on visits to the people who paper our lives, from industrial titans to craftspeople rediscovering ancient modes of making paper to the National September 11 Memorial and Museum at ground zero tasked with preserving a record of that single day. VERDICT An unhurried book that will be enjoyed not only by bibliophiles, librarians, and archivists but by many readers engaged by the study of the past and present. Stewart Desmond, New York. 448p. LIBRARY JOURNAL, c2013.

“The Race Underground: Boston, New York, and the Incredible Rivalry That Built America’s First Subway” by Doug Most – “Most … depicts the highly charged competition between Boston and New York in trying to construct the first underground “subway” railroad in late 19th-century America. It is a remarkably well-told story filled with villains, heroes, and events of the Gilded Age. Adding more heat to this intercity rivalry were brothers Henry Melville Whitney of Boston and William Collins Whitney of New York, who managed to push their own cities into successfully modernizing their transportation systems. Boston emerged the victor on September 1, 1897, with a system admittedly on a much smaller scale than initially envisioned. New York’s planned subway was, of course, much larger, taking longer to build, while plagued with misfortune (54 workers and civilians died during its construction) before it finally opened on October 27, 1904. While many books have been written about New York City’s subway, few have documented Boston’s herculean accomplishment in beating New York. Most deserves credit for setting the historical record straight. VERDICT This felicitous tale of American ingenuity and perseverance serves as a useful reminder today of our past commitment to improving our infrastructures as we now face the challenge of stopping their deterioration. Recommended for readers in American urban history and specialists in urban transportation. ” — Richard Drezen, Jersey City. 352p. LIBRARY JOURNAL, c2013.

ADULT AUDIO BOOK

 “Target” by David Baldacci – “…Earl Fontaine, a terminally ill Alabama death row prisoner, plans one last killing that will personally affect CIA hit man Will Robie and his fellow agent, Jessica Reel. Meanwhile in Washington, D.C., the U.S. president authorizes an operation to assassinate a foreign leader. Evan Tucker, the head of the CIA, recommends Robie and Reel, whose recent exploits have earned them the CIA’s highest medal, for the job. When that mission is scrubbed, Robie and Reel end up attempting a dangerous incursion into North Korea to rescue a couple of prisoners from the notorious Bukchang labor camp, a move that results in North Korea deciding to retaliate against the U.S. on its own territory. In unsparing detail, Baldacci depicts the brutal conditions in the North Korean camp, in particular their impact on 25-year-old Yie Chung-Cha, a prisoner groomed as a deadly assassin.” — Agent: Aaron Priest, Aaron M. Priest Literary Agency. (Apr.). 400p. PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, c2014.

DVD

“Dexter Season 6”
“Dexter Season 7”
“Escape Plan”
“Fast and Furious 1-5 Bundle”
“Fast and Furious 6”
“Free Birds”
“Saving Mr. Banks”
“Sherlock Season 2”
“Twelve Years a Slave”

MUSIC

“State of Wonder:Goldberg Variations”

JUVENILE

AUDIO

“Dork Diaries 7: Tales from a Not-So-Glam TV Star” by Rachel Renee Russell – “Nikki’s juggling a lot this month. A reality TV crew is following Nikki and her friends as they record their hit song together, plus there are voice lessons, dance practice, and little sister Brianna’s latest wacky hijinks. Nikki’s sure she can handle everything, but will all the excitement cause new problems for Nikki and Brandon, now that cameras are everywhere Nikki goes?” — Amazon.com

BOARD BOOK

“From Head to Toe” by Eric Carle
“I Love to Eat: Deluxe Touch and Feel (Spanish & French Edition)” by Amelie Graux

PICTURE BOOK

“A Lion in Paris” by Beatrice Alemagna
“Bad Bye Good Bye” by Deborah Underwood
“Breathe” by Scott Magoon
“Clara’s Crazy Curls” by Helen Poole
“Deep in the Sahara” by Kelly Cunnane
“Duck & Goose Go to the Beach” by Tad Hills
“A Giraffe and a Half: 50th Anniversary Edition” by Shel Silverstein
“Have You Seen My Dragon?” by Steve Light
“Jacob’s New Dress” by Sarah Hoffman
“Knock, Knock: My Dad’s Dream for Me” by Daniel Beaty
“Lafcadio: The Lion Who Shot Back” by Shel Silverstein
“Miss You Like Crazy” by Pamela Hall
“Moo” by David LaRochelle
“The Most Magnificent Thing” by Ashley Spires
“My Bus” by Byron Barton
“The Numberlys” by William Joyce
“Pete the Cat I Love My White Shoes” by Eric Litwin
“Pigeon Needs a Bath” by Mo Willems
“Quick as a Cricket” by Audrey Wood
“Tap the Magic Tree” by Christie Matheson
“Time Together: Me and Dad” by Maria Catherine
“Trouper” by Meg Kearney
“Velveteen Rabbit, or How Toys Become Real” by Margery Williams
“What’s Your Favorite Animal?” by Eric Carle

JUVENILE FICTION

 “Better Nate than Ever” by Nat Federle – “Grades 5-8. In this funny and insightful story, the dreams of many a small-town, theater-loving boy are reflected in the starry eyes of eighth-grader Nate. When Nate hops a Greyhound bus to travel across Pennsylvania to try out for the Broadway-bound musical based on the movie E.T., no one but his best friend, Libby, knows about it; not his athletic brother, religious father, or unhappy mother. Self-reliant, almost to an inauthentic fault, he arrives in Manhattan for the first time and finds his way into the audition with dramatic results, and when his estranged actress/waitress aunt suddenly appears, a troubled family history and a useful subplot surface. Nate’s emerging sexuality is tactfully addressed in an age-appropriate manner throughout, particularly in his wonderment at the differences between his hometown and N.Y.C., “a world where guys . . . can dance next to other guys who probably liked Phantom of the Opera and not get threatened or assaulted.” This talented first-time author has made the classic Chorus Line theme modern and bright for the Glee generation.” — Medlar, Andrew. 288p. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2013.

“Counting by 7’s” by Holly Goldberg Sloan – “Grades 7-10. In a voice that is frank, charming, and delightfully odd, Willow Chance narrates the strange and heartbreaking circumstances that lead her to find an offbeat, patchwork quilt of a family. As an adopted, self-identified “person of color,” precocious genius Willow unabashedly knows that she is different, but her parents love and support her idiosyncrasies, such as wearing her gardening outfit to school, her preoccupation with disease, her anthropological curiosity about her peers, and her obsession with the number seven. That self-assuredness shines through Willow’s narrative and becomes crucial to her survival after the unexpected death of her parents, which makes Willow a prime candidate for life in a group home–an environment that could be disastrous for an unusual child like her. Luckily, she finds new friends who are compelled to protect her: Mai and her family, who live in the garage behind the nail salon they own, and Willow’s slouch of a guidance counselor, Dell. Sloan (I’ll Be There, 2011) has masterfully created a graceful, meaningful tale featuring a cast of charming, well-rounded characters who learn sweet–but never cloying–lessons about resourcefulness, community, and true resilience in the face of loss.” — Hunter, Sarah. 384p. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2013.

“Fortunately the Milk” by Neil Gaiman – “…Gaiman has tried to write the only book anyone will need, ever, packing into it every adventure story written in the past 300 years. The book seems to include every plot on TVTropes.org. There’s a time machine. There are “wumpires” and pirates. The story is simple: A father goes to the store to buy milk. The only trouble is, he’s kidnapped by aliens, and by the end of the book, he’s being threatened by dancing dwarfs. Sometimes the book feels like a personal bet between the writer and the illustrator: “But can you draw this?” Young is always up to the challenge, no matter what gets thrown at him. He makes pirates look both dangerous and adorable. But once in a while, readers may wish that the author would stop throwing things. The best scene in the book is brief and quiet. The father asks a time-traveling stegosaurus where all the dinosaurs went. “The stars,” professor Steg says. “That is where we will have gone.” Frenetic as the story is, it’s hard not to love a novel that borrows equally from Calvin and Hobbes and The Usual Suspects. If you read only one book this year, a story with dancing dwarfs is always a wise choice. ” — (Adventure. 8-12). 128pg. KIRKUS MEDIA LLC, c2013.

“Golden Boy” by Tara Sullivan – “Grades 8-12. Born albino in a Tanzanian village, Habo suffers virulent prejudice for his pale skin, blue eyes, and yellow hair, even from his own family. At 13, he runs away to the city of Dar-es-Salaam, where he thinks he will find more acceptance: there are even two albino members of the government there. He finds a home as an apprentice to a blind sculptor who knows Habo is a smart boy with a good heart, and he teaches Habo to carve wood. But Habo is being pursued by a poacher who wants to kill him and sell his body parts on the black market to superstitious buyers in search of luck. Readers will be caught by the contemporary story of prejudice, both unspoken and violent, as tension builds to the climax. Just as moving is the bond the boy forges with his mentor, and the gripping daily events: Habo gets glasses for his weak eyes, discovers the library, and goes to school at last. The appended matter includes a Swahili glossary and suggestions for documentary videos.” — Rochman, Hazel. 368p. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2013.

“Half a Chance” by Cynthia Lord – “Grades 4-6. Lucy and her parents have no sooner moved to their new home, idyllically located on a New England lake, than her professional-photographer father is off on a work trip for the summer. As he leaves, Lucy learns from him about a photo contest for kids and decides to spend the summer working on winning it. As the days and weeks pass, Lucy makes friends with the boy next door, learns to kayak, joins in the community’s watch of nesting loons, and stays focused on taking photos that fulfill her father’s advice to make sure the picture implies a story. Lucy seems like a blandly average preteen character, but she comes into focus when she makes a concerted effort to help her elderly neighbor, whose awareness of the world around her is beginning to slip away with the onset of some kind of dementia, to see and enjoy what she loved in the past. Like in the author’s award-winning Rules (2006), the theme of self-discovery is offered here through a quietly disclosed character.” — Goldsmith, Francisca. 224p. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2014.

“Last But Not Least Lola Going Green” by Christine Pakklala – “Lola Zuckerman is always last—ding-dong, Z-for-Zuckerman last. What this means, of course, is that Lola has to win first place in her class’s “Going Green” contest. And she’ll need to beat Amanda Anderson—always first, and more importantly, her ex-best-friend! In this laugh-out-loud story with unforgettable characters—the first in an ongoing series about Lola’s travails—Lola’s out to prove that while she may be last, she is certainly not least!” — Amazon.com

“Menagerie” by Tui T. Sutherland – “Logan and his dad have moved to sleepy Xanadu, Wyoming, in hopes of discovering the whereabouts of Logan’s missing mother. The name of the town is no coincidence, for within its boundaries lies a secret zoo of mythical creatures operated by a direct descendant of Kubla Kahn. Logan’s classmate Zoe Kahn is in a pickle because six baby griffins have escaped under her watch, and she is going to be in big trouble if they don’t all end up back in their enclosure. Logan and Zoe, along with their friend Blue, cleverly (and secretly) set out to track down the griffins and figure out who let them escape in the first place. Full to bursting with animated fantasy creatures, such as a histrionic phoenix who erupts into flame whenever no one pays him enough attention and a pair of haughty, passive-aggressive unicorns, this silly, delightful story begs to be read aloud. Thanks to a cliff-hanger ending and a brand new mystery on the horizon, animal lovers will eagerly anticipate more Logan and Zoe adventures.” — Hunter, Sarah. 288p. Booklist Online. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2013.

“Rump: The True Story of Rumpelstiltskin” by Liesl Shurtliff – “In The Kingdom, one’s name is full of meaning and power, and young Rump is sure that his is incomplete. Just before his mother died in childbirth, she only managed to utter, “His name is Rump….” And so Rump grows up with his grandmother, mining the mountain for specks of gold for their greedy king and suffering ridicule for his name. Shurtliff’s world-building is inventive and immediately believable: gnomes rush about delivering messages they have somewhat memorized, gold-craving pixies are flying and biting nuisances, and wise witches live in the woods, as does a band of huge smelly trolls. All the elements of the original story are here-the greedy miller, the somewhat dimwitted daughter, and Rump’s magical ability to spin straw into gold-but Shurtliff fleshes out the boy’s backstory, developing an appealing hero who is coping with the curse of his magical skills while searching for his true name and destiny. This captivating fantasy has action, emotional depth, and lots of humor.” — Caroline Ward, The Ferguson Library, Stamford, CT. 264p. SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL, c2013.

“Saturday Boy” by David Fleming – “Ages 10-up. Eleven-year-old Derek has been having a rough time, both at school and at home, since his helicopter pilot father returned to Afghanistan with the Army “eight months, one week, and four days” ago. Derek’s mother is struggling with worried exhaustion, and his former best friend Budgie is antagonizing Derek at every opportunity. Derek relies on the comforts of his father’s letters, his wild imagination, his favorite superhero show, and his rehearsals for the school play (along with his crush Violet), but when his deepest fears are realized, Derek is forced to navigate a tumult of complex emotions and reevaluate what he values most dearly. Fleming’s debut skillfully depicts how the stresses of loss and other forces beyond one’s control test the bonds of family and friends; Derek’s relationship with his mother is especially honest and tender. The weight of the tragic, topical events is tempered by moments of laugh-out-loud humor and Derek’s energy and resilience as he muddles through the uncertainty of grief.” — Agent: George Nicholson, Sterling Lord Literistic. (June). 240p. Web-Exclusive Review. PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, c2013

JUVENILE BIOGRAPHY

 “Boy on the Wooden Box: How the Impossible Became Possible … on Schindler’s List” by Leon Leyson – “Grades 4-7. This powerful memoir of one of the youngest boys on Schindler’s list deserves to be shared. Leon Leyson grew up in Poland as the youngest of five children. As WWII breaks out, Leyson’s ingenuity and bravery, combined with the kindness of strangers and a bit of serendipity, save his life, time and again. The storytelling can at times meander, and the various reflections of his life in Poland during the war can result in a certain patchiness, but Leyson’s experiences and memories still make for compelling reading about what it was like to suffer through the Holocaust.” — Thompson, Sarah Bean. 240p. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2013.

“Mad Potter: George E. Ohr, Eccentric Genius” by Jan Greensberg – “Greenberg and Jordan bring to life George E. Ohr, a 19th-century American potter largely unknown today and not especially successful in his own day. George Ohr proclaimed himself the “Greatest Art Potter on Earth.” From the wild-eyed and mustachioed portrait on the cover to the artist’s own words sprinkled throughout the text in boldfaced, oversized typefaces, Ohr’s eccentricities and his penchant for self-promotion are clearly presented. What is not made clear is why Ohr’s work is considered great. What makes a George E. Ohr vase sell at auction nowadays for $84,000, and is he really America’s greatest art potter? Certainly his work is whimsical, as demonstrated by the many full-color photographs of Ohr’s work–vases tilting like leaning towers, a teapot with a spout like an open-mouthed serpent, and all manner of wrinkled, twisted and squashed vessels. … The backmatter …. is interesting, including information about the Frank Gehry-designed museum that houses the Ohr collection and lessons in “How to Look at a Pot” and how to use a potter’s wheel. A fascinating introduction to an innovative artist…”– KIRKUS MEDIA LLC, c2013.

“The President Has Been Shot: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy” by James Swanson – “Gr 6 Up. S…The event is not depicted as dry, textbook history, but rather as a horrifying and shocking crime. Full- and double-page photographs of President Kennedy and Lee Harvey Oswald, and stills from the famous Zapruder film-which captured the assassination in real time-breathe emotion into the work. Kennedy’s and Oswald’s backgrounds are illuminated as the narrative descends toward their tragic connection. A well-illustrated map of Dealey Plaza detailing the President’s route clarifies the position of relevant buildings and features at the time of the assassination. This book is graphic with respect to both images and verbage. Swanson provides a compelling case for Oswald as a lone gunman, arguing against the various and popular conspiracy theories. A diagram of the infamous “magic bullet” illustrates how a single bullet could cause multiple wounds for both JFK and Governor Connally. Despite the great number of books on Kennedy’s assassination, this volume stands out for its gripping storytelling style and photographic documentation.” — Jeffrey Meyer, Mount Pleasant Public Library, IA. 288p. SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL, c2013.

“To Dare Mighty Things: The Life of Theodore Roosevelt” by Doreen Rappaport – “Gr 2-5–…Roosevelt stands tall in American history, but his childhood was one of serious illness that kept him bedridden for long periods of time. He became an avid reader and yearned for the life of the adventurers he read about. “Teedie,” as he was called, longed to explore the wilderness and yearned to be a “fearless” man like his heroes. From his early political career through the challenges of his presidency, this book chronicles how he became that fearless leader. He confronted injustice head-on and promised a “Square Deal” to all citizens, opposed many special business interests, including the use of child labor, and sought to protect the nation’s wildlife and preserve its beauty. The highs and lows of both his personal and public life are presented here, including the death of his beloved wife, his experience as a soldier with the “Rough Riders,” and being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1906. Rappaport breathes life into her subject in a way that is sure to spark the interest of the most reluctant reader. Her choice of quotations defines the man’s lively personality and charisma, and Payne’s softly shaded artwork highlights his facial expressions and dramatically captures the robust emotion, good humor, and unstinting courage that are the hallmarks of the 26th president. Concisely written and yet poetic, this is a first purchase for every library. ” — Carole Phillips, Greenacres Elementary School, Scarsdale, NY. 48p. SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL, c2013.

JUVENILE NON-FICTION

“Beyond the Stones of Machu Picchu: Folk Tales and Stories of Inca Life” by Elizabeth Conrad VanBuskirk – ““Beautifully illustrated and sensitively told, these delightful tales and stories introduce us to the natural and supernatural worlds of the high Andes, where animal and human families dwell under the protective gaze of the Apus (mountain spirits). Traditional tales of Fox, Condor, and Bear are subtly interwoven with the author’s stories of daily life. As young people learn to weave, herd sheep, and meet the challenges of a rugged mile-high landscape, they experience the same frustrations and joys as any child . . . An intimate portrait of ancient Quechua customs and beliefs that have survived the forces of change for at least a thousand years.”  —Carol Karasik, author, The Turquoise Trail: Native American Jewelry and Culture of the Southwest  

“Courage Has No Color: The True Story of the Triple Nickles: America’s First Black Paratroopers” by Tanya Lee Stone – “Grades 5-9. Starting with a riveting opening that puts readers into the shoes of a paratrooper on a training flight, this large-format book offers an informative introduction to the 555th Parachute Infantry Battalion. Known as the Triple Nickles, they were America’s first black paratrooper unit. Though WWII brought increased racial integration to the military, the pace was painfully slow. This book traces the paratroopers’ story through their training and their long wait for orders to join the fighting overseas-orders that never came. Instead, the Triple Nickles were sent to fight fires in remote areas of western states. Decades passed before the men were officially honored for service to their country. Written with great immediacy, clarity, and authority, Stone’s vivid narrative draws readers into the Triple Nickles’ wartime experiences. Many well-chosen quotes enhance the text, while excellent black-and-white illustrations, mainly photos, document both the men of the 555th and the racial prejudice on the home front. Adding another personal perspective, artist and writer Ashley Bryan, an African American veteran of WWII, contributes the book’s foreword, a drawing, and a painting from the period. This handsome volume documents the sometimes harrowing, often frustrating, and ultimately rewarding experiences of the Triple Nickles.” — Phelan, Carolyn. 160p. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2013.

“Firefly July: A Year of Very Short Poems” by Lita Judge – “Ages 6-9. Never more than six or seven lines long–and some are just a few words–each poem in Janeczko’s (A Foot in the Mouth) spirited anthology celebrates an aspect of the seasons. Evocative and accessible, they make excellent prompts for classroom poetry exercises. “What is it the wind has lost,” ask poets Jim Harrison and Ted Kooser, “that she keeps looking for/ under each leaf?” Sweet’s (Little Red Writing) artwork is marvelously varied. In some spreads, the animals and people are drafted in thoughtful detail, while in others her line is loopy and spontaneous. Dragonflies and crickets blink with flirtatious cartoon-character eyes in one scene, while fireflies and their haunting light are painted with meditative calm in another. Beach towels are striped in hot colors; fog in a city is rice paper glued over a collage of tall buildings. William Carlos Williams’s red wheelbarrow and Carl Sandburg’s little cat feet appear along with lesser-known works. Even Langston Hughes’s poem about a crowded subway sounds a note of hope: “Mingled/ breath and smell/ so close/ mingled/ black and white/ so near/ no room for fear.” (Mar.). 48p. PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, c2014.

“How Big Were Dinosaurs?” by Lita Judge – “Grades K-2. … Judge (Bird Talk, 2012) … applies her masterful technique to her favorite extinct animals. Creatures like Velociraptor and Argentinosaurus are drawn side-by-side with living species, contextualizing their scale. Meanwhile, delightfully silly interactions among the creatures enliven the fun. Judge’s always noteworthy artwork is spectacular: the delicately mottled watercolors admirably depict musculature and texture, while the posture and expressions of the animals could not be more full of life and personality if they had been drawn from living specimens. …How Big Were Dinosaurs? pulls back to show the entire animal in context. Super stuff about super creatures, large and small.” — Willey, Paula. 40p. Booklist Online. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2013.

“My Mother Goose: A Collection of Favorite Rhymes, Songs and Concepts” by David McPhail – “Ages 2-5. McPhail’s familiar shaggy-haired toddlers and friendly animals lend themselves to this grouping of more than 60 Mother Goose rhymes. The verses flow naturally into one another. For “Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake,” a bear baker prepares to put a cake (marked with a “B”) in the oven. On the following page, for “Simple Simon,” a ginger-haired boy requests a pie from an alligator baker. Elsewhere, “Little Bo-Peep” leads into the similarly ovine “Baa, baa, black sheep,” and two bouncing children, “Jack be nimble” and “Little Jumping Joan,” share a spread. Short sections also introduce basic concepts that include shapes, colors, getting dressed, and methods of transportation. McPhail’s welcoming world of anthropomorphic animals and adventurous children is as distinctive and cozy as ever.” — Agent: Faith Hamlin, Sanford J. Greenburger Associates. (Oct.). 96p. PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, c2013.

“A Walk in Paris” by Salvatore Rubbino – “Preschool-Grade 3. …this large-format picture book follows a girl and her grandfather as they tour Paris together. From the market at Place Maubert, they stroll the boulevards to Place Saint-Michel and cross the River Seine to Notre-Dame Cathedral. After a bistro lunch, they pass by the Pompidou Center, the Louvre, and into the Tuileries Gardens. As darkness falls, they watch a light show at the Eiffel Tower, a fitting end to their day. Each double-page spread offers at least one new view of Paris, from a broad cityscape to a close-up of pastries in a shop window. Supplementing the journey story, notes in tiny type carry additional information. A stylized, highly simplified map of Paris appears on the front endpapers, while on the back, the same map is strewn with tickets, coins, souvenirs, and a brief index. Mixed-media illustrations capture the feel of the city while retaining Rubbino’s breezy and highly appealing style. Pure pleasure for armchair travelers.” — Phelan, Carolyn. 40p. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2014.

MUSIC

“You Are My Little Bird “

YOUNG ADULT

 “Eleanor & Park” by Rainbow Rowell – “Grades 9-12. Right from the start of this tender debut, readers can almost hear the clock winding down on Eleanor and Park. After a less than auspicious start, the pair quietly builds a relationship while riding the bus to school every day, wordlessly sharing comics and eventually music on the commute. Their worlds couldn’t be more different. Park’s family is idyllic: his Vietnam vet father and Korean immigrant mother are genuinely loving. Meanwhile, Eleanor and her younger siblings live in poverty under the constant threat of Richie, their abusive and controlling stepfather, while their mother inexplicably caters to his whims. The couple’s personal battles are also dark mirror images. Park struggles with the realities of falling for the school outcast; in one of the more subtle explorations of race and the other in recent YA fiction, he clashes with his father over the definition of manhood. Eleanor’s fight is much more external, learning to trust her feelings about Park and navigating the sexual threat in Richie’s watchful gaze. In rapidly alternating narrative voices, Eleanor and Park try to express their all-consuming love. You make me feel like a cannibal, Eleanor says. The pure, fear-laced, yet steadily maturing relationship they develop is urgent, moving, and, of course, heartbreaking, too.” — Jones, Courtney. 320p. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2013.

“Ready Player One” by Ernest Cline — “Young Wade Watts takes refuge in the OASIS, the ‘globally networked virtual reality’ that nearly all of humanity relies on. It’s 2044, the year before the Singularity futurist Ray Kurzweil predicts will inextricably unite humans and computers. Life on earth is bleak and sinister, thanks to failure to avert global warming and the oil crisis. An orphan, Wade lives in the Stacks, a vast slum comprising trailers piled in precarious towers, but keeps to his hideout, where he attends school online, plays video games, and sends his avatar, Parzival, to visit with Aech, his only friend. Fanboys (2009) screenwriter Cline brings his geeky ardor for 1980s pop culture to his first novel, an exuberantly realized, exciting, and sweet-natured cyberquest. Wade/Parzival, Aech, a droll blogger calling herself Art3mis, and two Japanese brothers embark on a grandly esoteric and potentially life- changing virtual Easter egg hunt and end up doing battle with a soulless corporation. Mind-twisting settings, nail-biting action, amusing banter, and unabashed sentiment make for a smart and charming Arthurian tale that will score high with gamers, fantasy and sf fans, and everyone else who loves stories of bumbling romance and unexpected valor.” —  Donna Seaman. 384pg. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2011.

“Reality Boy” by A. S. King – “Grades 9-12. Seventeen-year-old Gerald became infamous at age five, when he took a dump on his family’s kitchen table for the whole reality-TV viewing public to see. A network TV nanny came in to help Gerald be less of a problem child, but the cameras didn’t catch what Tasha, his older sister and tormentor, was doing to him and his other sister, Lisi, or his mother’s constant defense of her eldest daughter at the expense of her youngest children. And so Gerald continued to rage on. Though years of anger-management training and a boxing-gym regimen have helped him gain better control, his future still feels limited to jail or death. The narrative, though striking and often heartbreaking, is disjointed in places, namely with Gerald’s grand plan to run away to the circus. However, this is still a King novel, and the hallmarks of her strong work are there: magical realism, heightened emotion, and the steady, torturous, beautiful transition into self-assured inner peace. Like Gerald, it’s wonderfully broken.” —  Jones, Courtney. 368p. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2013.