Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – MARCH 2022

ADULT FICTION

“A House Between Earth and Moon” by Rebecca Scherm — “Compulsively readable. . . . A House Between the Earth and the Moon is a thought-provoking and absorbing read. By deftly combining the subjects of big tech and climate change, Scherm has created a world that fully embodies the anxiety and indignity of our times.” —Sandra Newman, The New York Times Book Review

“A Reason for Hope” by Kristin Von Kreisler — “After a distressing date with a respected member of the community, a bookmobile librarian on an island in Puget Sound decides to press charges and is comforted by a courthouse dog trained to help victims through the difficult judicial process.” — Atlas Publishing

“A Safe House” by Stuart Wood — “Stone Barrington is looking forward to some quiet time in New York City, until he is asked to transport precious, top-secret cargo across the Atlantic. Taking on the challenge, Stone flies off unaware of what-or who-he is bringing with him. But his plans to lie low are quickly spoiled when a dangerous dispatcher tracks down Stone and his tantalizing mystery guest, intent on payback-and silencing anyone who poses a threat. From the English countryside to the balmy beaches of Key West, Stone is on an international mission to hide and protect those closest to him”– Baker & Taylor

Disappearing Earth” by Julia Phillips — “Accomplished and gripping. . . . Phillips’ spellbinding prose is saturated with sensuous nuance and emotional intensity, as she subtly traces the shadows of Russia’s past and illuminates today’s daunting complexities of gender and identity, expectations and longing.” Booklist (starred review)

Fire & Blood” by George R. R. Martin — “Martin has done it again. . . . [Fire & Blood is] a beautiful weaving of the wars, marriages, deaths, dragons, and politics that shape the world Martin has created, leaving the reader feeling like this is a true history rather than a piece of fantasy. This is a masterpiece of world-building. . . . Beyond Martin’s legions of fans, anyone with a taste for richly, even obsessively detailed historical fiction or fantasy about royalty will enjoy this extraordinary work.”Booklist (starred review)

“French Braid” by Anne Tyler — “The wonder of French Braid is the easygoing fluidity with which Tyler jumps and floats between characters and decades to create what in the end is a deftly crafted family portrait that spans some 70 years . . . We read in fascination.” Christian Science Monitor

“High Stakes” by Danielle Steel — “Five women work together at a boutique literary and talent agency while the challenges of their individual lives causes chaos both inside and outside the office.” — Baker & Taylor

“House of Sky and Breath” by Sarah J. Maas — “After saving Crescent City, Bryce, Hunt and their friends get pulled into the rebels’ plans to chip away at the Asteri’s power, in the second novel of the series following House of Earth and Blood” — Baker & Taylor

Ocean State” by Stewart O’Nan — “[A] beautifully rendered and heartbreaking story…This isn’t a crime novel; it’s a Shakespearean tragedy told in spare, poetic, insightful prose.”—Publishers Weekly, starred review

“One Italian Summer” by Rebecca Serle — “An unconventional love story that embraces people’s flaws and selfishness as part of what makes them human.” —Kirkus

“Run Rose Run” by Dolly Parton and James Patterson — “On the rise and on the run, a young singer-songwriter arrives in Nashville to claim her destiny, but it’s also where the darkness she’s fled might find her–and destroy her.” — Baker & Taylor

Slough House” by Mick Herron — “Herron’s excellent series featuring a motley crew of sidelined MI5 agents united under the fearless leadership of the unforgettable Jackson Lamb, has grown ever-more reflective — if not downright prescient — of contemporary political machinations, and is all the richer for it.” —The Boston Globe

“Thank You, Mr. Nixon: Stories” by Gish Jen — “Stunning . . . Hilarious [and] heartbreaking . . . A fresh take on the experience of immigration and exile . . . Political and economic relations between China and the United States are major news, but Jen takes it to the micro level in her vibrant short stories about characters who are varying degrees of Chinese and American . . . Recurring and related characters link all of the stories, which are set across several decades. Jen’s crisp prose, wonderful eye for detail, and wry humor make them a joy to read, and there is wisdom here, too.” Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“The Berlin Exchange” by Joseph Kanon — “[A] riveting tale of a spy forced to go back into the cold as a way of reclaiming his life. . . . Genuine suspense, including an exciting variation on the border-crossing theme, combine beautifully with moving psychological drama.” Booklist (starred review)

“The Diamond Eye” by Kate Quinn — “The Diamond Eye is another winner from Kate Quinn. A historian-turned-sniper who falls in love in wartorn Russia and then befriends Eleanor Roosevelt – what’s not to love? The thrilling showdown at the end is not to be missed!” —  Kaia Alderson, author of Sisters in Arms

“The Fortnight in September” by R. C. Sherriff — “Extraordinary. . . . The pages are full of anticipation. . . . [T]here’s a sense that time is ticking on these vacations. It must be savored, and so, too, should this very special book.” Booklist Reviews (starred)

“The Last Garden in England” by Julia Kelly — “Three women across time are connected by a garden in Kelly’s enjoyable and richly detailed latest…Kelly balances Emma’s detective work reviewing papers and records found in the house with Venetia’s slow-burn tragedy and the twist that defines Beth’s relationship to the gardens. Kelly easily delivers everything her fans will expect.”Publishers Weekly

The Library of Lost and Found” by Phaedra Patrick — “A heartwarming and tender tale of growth and redemption…. Curl up by the fire with a cup of tea and a biscuit and be entranced by this delightful story.” —Library Journal, starred review

“The Love of My Life” by Rosie Walsh — “Walsh masterfully shows both [protagonists’] points of view while maintaining an intoxicating air of mystery…a propulsive thriller with heart that will keep readers guessing.”
Kirkus, starred review

The Sanatorium” by Sarah Pearse –“Pearse not only creates believably fallible characters, she also vividly portrays the frigid landscape of Le Sommet buffeted by blizzards, and a chilling epilogue cries out for a sequel. Crime-fiction readers will want to keep an eye on Pearse.” Booklist (starred review)

“What Happened to the Bennetts” by Lisa Scottoline — “Just might be the best book Scottoline has ever written, a masterpiece of misdirection, where nothing is as it seems, and a scorching character study of a man at the end of his rope who’s not about to go down without a fight.”
—Providence Journal

ADULT MYSTERY

“A Sunlit Weapon” by Jacqueline Winspear — “In the latest installment of the New York Times bestselling series, a series of possible attacks on British pilots leads Jacqueline Winspear’s beloved heroine Maisie Dobbs into a mystery involving First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt.” — Amazon.com

“Find Me” by Alafair Burke — “The two women feverishly piece together the disparate parts of the story, and Burke’s masterful control over pacing and plot reveals will make readers just as anxious to uncover the truth.” — BookPage

“Give Unto Others” by Donna Leon — “Once again, Brunetti’s remarkable empathy with people takes him into shark-infested waters, forced to confront how ‘revenge, that deformed child of justice, fed itself with blind desire.’ Another moving meditation on the vagaries of human relationships posing as a mystery novel. There is no ambiguity about the unalloyed affection millions of readers feel toward Guido Brunetti, one of crime fiction’s most popular protagonists.” —Booklist (starred review)

“The Match” by Harlan Coben — “The topical follow-up to Coben’s best-selling The Boy from the Woods addresses reality shows, DNA searches, cyberbullying, and social media influencers in a suspenseful novel guaranteed to be a hit.”―Library Journal (Starred Review)

ADULT NON-FICTION

“50 States, 500 Campgrounds: Where to Go, When to Go, What to See, What to Do” by Joe Yogerst — “An illustrated guide to 500 of the best campgrounds across North America offers the top places to pitch a tent, rent a cabin, or bring your RV with information on location, open seasons, amenities, local activities and attractions.” — Atlas Publishing

“Dark and Magical Places: The Neuroscience of Navigation” by Christopher Kemp — “Kemp debunks numerous myths, including the idea that females possess poorer navigational skills than males, and reflects on the difference between the navigational abilities of modern humans versus those of Neanderthals. What separates the two, he suggests, is the use of the subjunctive form, which led to humans being better at navigating. Kemp peppers in accounts of his own poor navigational abilities and colorful stories of people getting lost, which keep things moving along. The result is both enjoyable and accessible.”― Publishers Weekly

How Civil Wars Start: And How to Stop Them” by Barbara F. Walter — “How Civil Wars Start is a stop sign for us—and an imperative book for our time. The evidence-based preventative measures could not be more urgent. Read and act.”—Ibram X. Kendi, author of How to Be an Antiracist

“Learning to Walk in the Dark” by Barbara Brown Taylor — “An elegant writer with the common touch, Taylor is always a wonderful guide to the spiritual world, and this book is no exception. Here she encourages us to turn out the lights and embrace the spiritual darkness, for it is in the dark, she maintains, that one can truly see.” — Booklist

“Powder Days: Ski Bums, Ski Towns and the Future of Chasing Snow” by Heather Hansman — ” “Powder Days is a bittersweet love letter to skiing, mountain towns, and the people that make them work. As the climate warms and the income gap widens, Heather Hansman is clear-eyed about the challenges and flaws of the ski industry. But she never loses sight of the magic.”—Eva Holland, author of Nerve: Adventures in the Science of Fear 

“Stolen Focus: Why You Can’t Pay Attention and How to Think Deeply Again” by Johann Hari — “In his unique voice, Johann Hari tackles the profound dangers facing humanity from information technology and rings the alarm bell for what all of us must do to protect ourselves, our children, and our democracies.”—Hillary Clinton

“The Naked Don’t Fear Water: An Underground Journey with Afghan Refugees” by Matthieu Aikins — “Riveting…The book shines a humane spotlight on many of the people the author met along the way as well as on the role chance played in their fates, with particularly moving chapters on life within the Greek refugee camp. The narrative is scrupulous and often suspenseful.”  — Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

VERMONT NON-FICTION

“Vermont History: Volume 90, No. 1: Winter Spring 2022”

ADULT AUDIO BOOK

“Never” by Ken Follett — “Never is an extraordinary novel, full of heroines and villains, false prophets and elite warriors, jaded politicians and opportunistic revolutionaries. It brims with cautionary wisdom for our times, and delivers a visceral, heart-pounding story that transports listeners to the brink of the unimaginable.” — Amazon.com

BLUE/DVD MOVIES

“All Creatures Great & Small: Season 1”
“Austin Powers in Goldmember”
“Belfast”
“The Matrix Resurrections”
“West Side Story”

JUVENILE MOVIES

“Clifford the Big Red Dog”
“Sing 2”

YOUNG ADULT NON-FICTION

“Standing in This Place: Growing up LGBTQ in Vermont” by Maura Campbell — “An original play by Maura Campbell, based on the lives of real people. This play was commissioned by Vermont Pride Theater at Chandler, for its ninth annual Summer Pride Festival. Its premiere performances took place at Chandler on July 26 and August 3, 2019. The script was based on interviews…. (from verso)” — Photographs ©2021m Ramsey Papp, GoodReads.com

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – FEBRUARY 2022

ADULT FICTION

“Christmas at the Restaurant” by Pamela Kelley — “Nantucket’s famous Christmas Stroll is always the first weekend of December and this year sisters Mandy and Emma, and Paul, the executive chef, want to do something extra special for Mimi’s Place, the restaurant they co-own. It will be Emma and Paul’s first Christmas together as a couple and Mandy’s first holiday as a newly single and divorced mother of two. Although Mandy does have a promising new relationship, she wants to take things very slow. Their sister Jill and her new husband, Billy, are planning to spend the whole month of December on Nantucket too, juggling working remotely for the executive search firm they own together in Manhattan and relaxing and spending time with family and helping out at the restaurant too. And Gina, one of their best servers and bartender, is spending her first winter on Nantucket and it’s a bit of an adjustment. Winters on Nantucket are so much quieter than the city life she was used to. She’s even more confused when someone she had a major crush on back in the city moves to Nantucket. Suddenly her boring winter is starting to look a lot more interesting.” — Amazon.com

“Fifty Words for Rain” by Asha Lemmie — Daughter of a married Japanese aristocrat and her African American GI lover, Nori struggles to seek acceptance in post-World War II Japan, even as she is hidden away in the attic of her grandparents’ imperial estate and forced to take chemical baths to lighten her skin. The arrival of her half-brother provides her with an unexpected ally. In-house excitement over this debut.” — LIBRARY JOURNAL, c2020.

“Mistress of the Ritz” by Melanie Benjamin — “This impeccably researched, lyrically told historical about a brash American woman and her French husband during WWII is a remarkable achievement. . . . Benjamin skillfully weaves in a host of historical figures—including Coco Chanel, alleged to be a Nazi sympathizer, and Ernest Hemingway—whose vibrant presences make Benjamin’s protagonists and engaging group of supporting characters shine all the more. Even readers who aren’t big fans of historical fiction might be swayed by this outstanding tale.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“The Hotel” by Pamela Kelley — “The Whitley was Nantucket’s most exclusive hotel. …If you worked in the hospitality industry, landing a job at The Whitley was the ultimate goal. Many of the staff had lived and worked there for years. There were strict rules about the staff keeping their distance from both the guests and the family. But sometimes, rules were broken. No one is more surprised than Paula Whitley when her grandfather, Wynn Whitley, the founder of the hotel and many other business holdings, makes two big announcements. He is promoting Paula from her quiet behind the scenes role handling the accounting, to being in charge of everything. The rest of the family, siblings, cousins, aunts, uncles and parents, are stunned and not everyone is happy about it. And the second big announcement–she’s expected to work closely with a newly-hired consultant, a turnaround expert in luxury hotels. Paula dislikes David Connolly immediately. He’s arrogant and bossy and annoyingly right most of the time. She’d be loving her new role, if it wasn’t for him. And everyone, family and staff are wondering–what is grandfather’s goal? Is he looking to sell The Whitley?” — Baker & Taylor

“The Maid” by Nita Prose — “Prose threads a steady needle with the intricate plotting, the locked-room elements of the mystery, and especially Molly’s character. . . . The reader comes to understand Molly’s worldview, and to sympathize with her longing to be accepted—a quest that gives The Maid real emotional heft.”—The New York Times Book Review

The Restaurant” by Pamela Kelley — “Three sisters. An inherited Nantucket restaurant. One year before they can sell.Mandy, Emma and Jill are as close as three sisters who live hundreds of miles apart can be…. When their beloved grandmother, Rose Ferguson passes peacefully in her sleep a week before her ninety-ninth birthday she leaves them quite a surprise. In addition to her Nantucket home, they learned that she was the silent owner of Mimi’s Place, one of Nantucket’s most popular year-round restaurants. There is of course, a catch–she left the restaurant equally to Mandy, Emma, and Jill–and also to Paul, the chef for the past twelve years.And before they can sell, all three girls need to work at the restaurant for a period of one year–or else their shares will go to Paul–who was also Emma’s first love. Three sisters inherit a Nantucket restaurant and must work together for a year–or lose their shares to the chef. Paul was Emma’s first love, and now he’s their business partner.” — Amazon.com

“The Trees” by Percival Everett — “Everett has mastered the movement between unspeakable terror and knockout comedy.” ―The New York Times Book Review

“The Violin Conspiracy” by Brendan Slocumb — “[A] gripping debut. . . . Slocumb sensitively portrays Ray’s resilience in the face of extreme racism. The author is off to a promising start.” — Publishers Weekly

“To Paradise” by Hanya Yanagihara — “We are given a patriarch, wealth, children; there is an arranged marriage, an inheritance, a true love, a class divide and a significant twist. Deftly paced and judiciously detailed, the tale makes hay with the conventions of the 19th-century novel. But that’s not all. With breathtaking audacity Yanagihara rewrites America….Yanagihara masterfully repurposes themes, situations and motifs…This ambitious novel tackles major American questions and answers them in an original, engrossing way. It has a major feel. But it is finally in [its] minor moments that Yanagihara shows greatness.” – Gish Jen, The New York Times Book Review(cover review)

“Violeta” by Isabel Allende — “Another gift of epic storytelling . . . A Long Petal of the Sea is a love story for these times.” —NPR

ADULT NON-FICTION

“Bee People and the Bugs They Love” by Frank Mortimer — “…it is an achievement to convey so much knowledge so accessibly without once seeming overbearing. The main reason it all works is the honest descriptions of friendships that spring up around a shared, all-absorbing interest in bees.  And Mortimer intersperses useful facts about his passion in a successful and funny book that is sure to swell the ranks of the world’s beekeepers.” –New York Times

“Greek Myths: A New Retelling” by Charlotte Higgins — “Chief culture writer at the Guardian and winner of the Classical Association Prize, Higgins takes a fresh look at Greek myths, retold throughout the millennia given their unerring understanding of the human condition. Higgins works from the perspective of women, from goddesses to witches to wives, mothers, and daughters, as if they were weaving these stories together into one grand tapestry. Illustrator Ofili has exhibited at the Tate Britain and New York’s New Museum. Big in-house love.” — Barbara Hoffert. LIBRARY JOURNAL, c2021.

“The Monastic Heart: 50 Simple Practices for a Contemplative and Fulfilling Life” by Joan Chittister — “[An] impeccable guide . . . Filled with many suggestions for ways to forge greater connections with one’s community and God’s will, Chittister’s program will serve as a powerful corrective to those looking to slow down.” —Publishers Weekly

“Unsettling Truths: The Ongoing, Dehumanizing Legacy of the Doctrine of Discovery” by Mark Charles — “This sobering critique presents a disturbing yet welcome analysis of how the Doctrine of Discovery has split American church and society along racial lines, and makes a powerful argument for engaging in national dialogue around issues of class, gender, and race.” — Publishers Weekly, October 14, 2019

“Woke Racism: How a New Religion Has Betrayed Black America” by John McWhorter — “Honest commentary about racial controversies is rare, and John McWhorter is a writer who can be counted on to provide it. Woke Racism is a heartfelt evisceration of the sloppy thinking that forms the foundation of so much social justice activism today. It’s an essential contribution to our national discussion about racial inequality, and McWhorter’s willingness to put unvarnished truth above politically correct niceties deserves our gratitude.”—Jason L. Riley, Wall Street Journal columnist and author of “Maverick”

JUVENILE FICTION

“Bird” by Zetta Elliott — “Bird, an artistic young African-American boy, expresses himself through drawing as he struggles to understand his older brother’s drug addiction and death, while a family friend, Uncle Son, provides guidance and understanding.” — Atlas Publishing

JUVENILE MOVIES

“Encanto”

Categories
Highlighted New Arrivals

The Violin Conspiracy by Brendan Slocumb

“The Violin Conspiracy” by Brendan Slocumb — “[A] gripping debut. . . . Slocumb sensitively portrays Ray’s resilience in the face of extreme racism. The author is off to a promising start.” — Publishers Weekly

Categories
Highlighted New Arrivals

Woke Racism: How a New Religion Has Betrayed Black America by John McWhorter

“Honest commentary about racial controversies is rare, and John McWhorter is a writer who can be counted on to provide it. Woke Racism is a heartfelt evisceration of the sloppy thinking that forms the foundation of so much social justice activism today. It’s an essential contribution to our national discussion about racial inequality, and McWhorter’s willingness to put unvarnished truth above politically correct niceties deserves our gratitude.”—Jason L. Riley, Wall Street Journal columnist and author of “Maverick”

Categories
Highlighted New Arrivals

Bird by Zetta Elliott

“Bird, an artistic young African-American boy, expresses himself through drawing as he struggles to understand his older brother’s drug addiction and death, while a family friend, Uncle Son, provides guidance and understanding.” — Atlas Publishing

Categories
Highlighted New Arrivals

Home Before Dark by Riley Sager

“In the latest thriller from New York Times bestseller Riley Sager, a woman returns to the house made famous by her father’s bestselling horror memoir. Is the place really haunted by evil forces, as her father claimed? Or are there more earthbound-and dangerous-secrets hidden within its walls?” — Baker & Taylor

Categories
Highlighted New Arrivals

The 1619 Project by Nikole Hannah-Jones

“The 1619 Project” by Nikole Hannah-Jones — “This ongoing initiative from The New York Times Magazine that began on the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery reimagines if our national narrative actually started in late August of 1619, when a ship arrived in Jamestown bearing a cargo of 20-30 enslaved people from Africa.” — Atlas Publishing

Categories
Highlighted New Arrivals

Annie Sullivan and the Trials of Helen Keller

“In Annie Sullivan and the Trials of Helen Keller, author and illustrator Joseph Lambert examines the powerful bond between teacher and pupil, forged through the intense frustrations and revelations of Helen’s early education. The result is an inspiring, emotional, and wholly original take on the story of these two great Americans.” — Amazon.com

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – JANUARY 2022

ADULT FICTION

“A Solitude of Wolverines” by Alice Henderson — “The novel is packed with action. Alex is smart, with an impressive knowledge of wildlife as well as guns and self-defense tactics. It’s no plot spoiler to say she survives and will be back.” — Denver Post

“Confessions on the 7:45” by Lisa Unger — “Diabolically clever…. [An] exquisitely crafted psychological thriller.” Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Deep Survival” by Laurence Gonzales — “Riveting accounts of avalanches, mountain accidents, sailors lost at sea, and the man-made hell of 9/11.”
Stephen Bodio, Sports Illustrated

“Home Before Dark” by Riley Sager — “In the latest thriller from New York Times bestseller Riley Sager, a woman returns to the house made famous by her father’s bestselling horror memoir. Is the place really haunted by evil forces, as her father claimed? Or are there more earthbound-and dangerous-secrets hidden within its walls?” — Baker & Taylor

“Last Summer at the Golden Hotel” by Elyssa Friedland — “Written with Friedland’s signature wit and sharp dialogue, Last Summer at the Golden Hotel is an incisive novel that touches on family legacies, nostalgia, and multigenerational dynamics. Readers not content with armchair immersion will want to book their Catskill getaway immediately.”–Booklist

“Malibu Rising” by Taylor Jenkins Reid — “Reid’s descriptions of Malibu are so evocative that readers will swear they feel the sea breeze on their faces or the grit of the sand between their toes. . . . A compulsively readable story about the bonds between family members and the power of breaking free.”Kirkus Reviews

“Normal People” by Sally Rooney — “[Rooney’s] two carefully observed and gentle comedies of manners . . . are tender portraits of Irish college students. . . . Remarkably precise—she captures meticulously the way a generation raised on social data thinks and talks.”—New York Review of Books

“The Castaways” by Lucy Clarke –“A beautifully written, emotional and intelligent thriller. Full of atmosphere and tension as well as brilliantly drawn characters that I cared about. I loved it!” — Claire Douglas. Amazon.com

The Nowhere Child” by Christian White — “In this stunning first novel, White weaves stories within stories while keeping the thrilling mystery alive. [A] tightly woven debut thriller.”―Library Journal (starred review)

ADULT MYSTERY

“The Long Call” by Ann Cleeves — “As usual with this talented author, the key is relationships, and the murder is an occasion to examine them and then, finally, to expose what rips them apart.”―Booklist

“The Heron’s Call” by Ann Cleeves — “In her follow-up to The Long Call (2019), Cleeves provides a complex mystery full of surprises. This character-driven exploration of people’s darkest flaws is a sterling example of Cleeves’ formidable talents.”Kirkus Reviews (Starred Review)

“The Sun Down Motel” by Simone St. James — “[A] truly nightmarish trip back and forth in time and into the supernatural…guaranteed to keep readers rapt…What a story!”—Booklist (starred review)

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“The Storyteller” by Dave Grohl — “Grohl candidly shares his reverence for the enduring power of music. . . Reflecting on his fame, Grohl writes, “I have never taken a single moment of it for granted.” Paired with his sparkling wit, this humility is what makes Grohl’s soulful story a cut above typical rock memoirs. There isn’t a dull moment here.” — Publishers Weekly (starred review)

ADULT NON-FICTION

“How to Forage for Mushrooms Without Dying: An Absolute Beginner’s Guide to Identifying 29 Wild, Edible Mushrooms” by Frank Hyman — “Using vivid photos, the book explains how to identify, clean, preserve and cook 29 varieties of edible mushrooms, while celebrating the glorious range of mushroom scents (watermelon rind, fish, lemon) and flavors (hints of crabmeat, chicken, egg noodles, vanilla).” — Peter Saenger, Wall Street Journal 

“Patterns in Nature: Why the Natural World Looks the Way It Does” by Philip Ball — “From tigers’ stripes to the hexagons that make up honeycombs to the ripples in windblown sand, the natural world is full of order and regularity. Science writer Ball investigates the phenomenon in his new book, Patterns in Nature, with 250 photographs of snowflakes, shells, and more. Nature’s patterns follow basic principles of mathematics and physics, leading to similarities in the stripes, spirals, branches and fractals around us. ‘There’s an abundance of detail in nature that we can’t see,” he says. “Even in what seems unstructured, there’s pattern.’” ― Wall Street Journal

“Sandor Katz’s Fermentation Journeys: Recipes, Techniques, and Traditions from Around the World” by Sandor Ellix Katz — “Sandor Katz documents the joys, quirks, and health benefits of fermentation in all its global variety. This encyclopedic cookbook-cum-travel memoir provides 60 recipes that are seeded within a broader discussion of regional techniques and traditions, peppered with profiles of the experts and eateries discovered by Katz on his voyages. . . .This international romp is funky in the best of ways.”Publishers Weekly

“Second-Chance Dogs: True Stories of the Dogs We Rescue and the Dogs Who Rescue Us” by Callie Smith Grant — “This collection of more than thirty contemporary, true, feel-good stories spotlights the beauty of being rescued–dogs rescued by people, people rescued by dogs, and even dogs who rescue other animals. It’s the perfect companion–well, besides the four-legged, tail-wagging kind–for your morning cup of coffee or an evening curled up on the couch.” — Amazon.com

“The 1619 Project” by Nikole Hannah-Jones — “This ongoing initiative from The New York Times Magazine that began on the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery reimagines if our national narrative actually started in late August of 1619, when a ship arrived in Jamestown bearing a cargo of 20-30 enslaved people from Africa.” — Atlas Publishing

“Winter Recipes from the Collective” by Louise Gluck — “Glück considers a primary human loneliness in humane, reflective poems that are deeply engaged with the idea of being alone with oneself . . . With this magnificent collection, a great poet delivers a treatise on how to live and die.” ―Publishers Weekly (Starred Review)

BLUE/DVD MOVIES

“The Dry”
“Dune”
“Spencer”

BOARD BOOK

“Norbert the Winter Game” by Daniela Drescher

PICTURE BOOK

“Accident” by Andrea Tsurumi

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Annie Sullivan and the Trials of Helen Keller” by Joseph Lambert — “In Annie Sullivan and the Trials of Helen Keller, author and illustrator Joseph Lambert examines the powerful bond between teacher and pupil, forged through the intense frustrations and revelations of Helen’s early education. The result is an inspiring, emotional, and wholly original take on the story of these two great Americans.” — Amazon.com

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – DECEMBER 2021

ADULT FICTION

“A Calling for Charlie Barnes” by Joshua Ferris — “”Ferris writes with an exuberant style that propels the reader… as A Calling for Charlie Barnes shows, fiction is an art form deliberately used to get to a deeper truth than fact. It’s not a denial of reality, but a more serious journey into it.”―The Boston Globe

“Chronicles from the Land of the Happiest People on Earth” by Wole Soyinka — “A biting satire that looks at corruption in an imaginary contemporary Nigeria, Chronicles is also an intriguing and droll whodunit. . . . A brilliant story that takes on politics, class, corruption, and religion from the very first chapters. It highlights Soyinka’s lush, elegant language.” Publishers Weekly

“Detransition, Baby” by Torrey Peters” — “With heart and savvy, [Detransition, Baby upends] our traditional, gendered notions of what parenthood can look like.”The New York Times Book Review

“Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone” by Dina Gabaldon — “It is 1779 and Claire and Jamie are at last reunited with their daughter, Brianna, her husband, Roger, and their children on Fraser’s Ridge. Having the family together is a dream the Frasers had thought impossible. Yet even in the North Carolina backcountry, the effects of war are being felt. Tensions in the Colonies are great and local feelings run hot enough to boil Hell’s teaketttle. Jamie knows loyalties among his tenants are split and it won’t be long until the war is on his doorstep”– Baker & Taylor

“Hamnet” by Maggie O’Farrell — “Miraculous… brilliant… A novel told with the urgency of a whispered prayer — or curse…  through the alchemy of her own vision, she has created a moving story about the way loss viciously recalibrates a marriage…  A richly drawn and intimate portrait of 16th-century English life set against the arrival of one devastating death.”
–Ron Charles, The Washington Post

“Harlem Shuffle” by Colson Whitehead — “Fast-paced, keen-eyed and very funny, “Harlem Shuffle” is a novel about race, power and the history of Harlem all disguised as a thrill-ride crime novel.” San Francisco Chronicle

“My Monticello” by Jocelyn Nicole Johnson — “The narrative is bold, harrowing and unfolds with urgency. Johnson’s collection is . . . concerned with issues surrounding racial identity and the legacies of slavery and racism. Together they create an unnerving portrait of a country wrestling with its ugly past and present.” Time

“Never” by Ken Follett — “Absolutely compelling . . . A smart, scary, and all-too-plausible thriller.”Booklist

“North” by Brian Kessler — “In Brad Kessler’s fine new novel, North…the seemingly disparate lives that converge on a snowy Vermont night—Sahro, a Somali refugee seeking asylum, and Father Christopher, the abbot of a mountain monastery—are woven together with intricate threads of home, flight, sanctuary, danger, hope, faith, storytelling and much more.”―Shelf Awareness

“Our Country Friends” by Gary Shteyngart — “At turns bitingly funny and unbearably sad, it’s among the first major works of literary fiction to wrestle with the psychological, sociological and cultural impact of the pandemic, and marks a new, more reflective register for Shteyngart.”—The New York Times

Silverview” by John Le Carre — “One of [le Carré’s] most touching and satisfying [novels] – for putting into high relief this beloved author’s vision for his country and his disappointments, and perhaps most of all, the elegance and coloristic palette of his unique and incomparable prose.” —Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

“Such a Quiet Place” by Megan Miranda — “Miranda, who makes the setting, where everyone knows one another and ends up fearing one another, all the more chilling for its seeming normality, is a master of misdirection and sudden plot twists, leading up to a wallop of an ending. A powerful, paranoid thriller.” – Booklist (Starred Review)

“Termination Shock” by Neal Stephenson — “Stephenson is one of speculative fiction’s most meticulous architects. . . .Termination Shock manages to pull off a rare trick, at once wildly imaginative and grounded.” — New York Times Book Review

“The Holiday Swap” by Maggie Knox — “The Holiday Swap dishes up a double dose of fun-loving, feel-good, Christmas cheer, with a recipe for love that’s deliciously irresistible.” —Karen Schaler, author of Finding Christmas

“The Morning Star” by Karl Ove Knausgaard — “Knausgaard retains the ability to lock you, as if in a tractor beam, into his storytelling. He takes the mundane stuff of life—the need to take a leak, the joy of killing pesky flies—and essentializes them . . . Knausgaard is among the finest writers alive.” —Dwight Garner, New York Times

“The Northern Reach” by W. S. Winslow — “Is there anything better than getting to walk through a small and unfamiliar town and peer through the windows into the lives lived in the houses there? The Northern Reach gives you that rich and satisfying treat. Here is a Maine as various and stark as the pull of tides in every human heart.” – Sarah Blake, author of The Guest Book

“The Only Woman in the Room” by Marie Benedict — “A powerful book based on the incredible true story of the glamour icon and scientist, The Only Woman in the Room is a masterpiece that celebrates the many women in science that history has overlooked.” — Amazon.com

“The Other Black Girl” by Zaklya Dalila Harris — “A satire of the clueless racial politics at a prestigious literary house with, in its second half, a horror-movie twist.” ― Wall Street Journal

“The Parted Earth” by Anjali Enjeti — “Like her characters, Enjeti ultimately reaches for hope. The Parted Earth is a testament to the tremendous strength of the people of India and Pakistan who found the courage to begin again.” —Shelf Awareness

“The Room on Rue Amilie” by Kristin Harmel — “Harmel writes a poignant novel based loosely on the true story of an American woman who helped on the Comet Line, which rescued hundreds of airmen and soldiers. This compelling story celebrates hope and bravery in the face of evil.”– (Booklist)

“The Sentence” by Louise Erdrich — “Scintillating…More than a gripping ghost story, THE SENTENCE offers profound insights into the effects of the global pandemic and the collateral damage of systemic racism. It adds up to one of Erdrich’s most…illuminating works to date.”  — Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“The Stars We Share” by Rafe Posey — “This compelling debut novel offers rich descriptions [and] . . . plenty to discuss about how world events impact individuals and the sometimes heart-wrenching compromises we must make to find happiness.” Booklist

“The Wish” by Nicholas Sparks — “As with all of Sparks’ novels, emotions play a huge part. Though a bittersweet story, The Wish is a thought-provoking chronicle of a few decades in the protagonist’s life. In the course of that life, she unearths her self-worth, self-acceptance, and the magnitude of first love.” – New York Journal of Books

“What Strange Paradise” by Omar El Akkad — “El Akkad’s compelling, poetic prose captures the precarity and desperation of people pushed to the brink . . . A compassionate snapshot of one Syrian refugee’s struggle to plot a course for home.”Kirkus Reviews

“Wish You Were Here” by Jodi Picoult — “Wish You Were Here is a transporting and transcendent novel about seeking out glimmers of light in the darkness, and following them wherever they lead. Jodi Picoult is that rare, one-in-a-million writer whose books both squeeze your heart and expand your mind. Her latest is wise, surprising, and utterly extraordinary.”⁠—Emily Henry, #1 New York Times bestselling author of People We Meet on Vacation and Beach Read

ADULT MYSTERY

Faithless in Death” by J. D. Robb — “In Faithless in Death, the new Eve Dallas police thriller from #1 New York Times bestselling author Nora Roberts, what looked like a lover’s quarrel turned fatal has bigger―and more terrifying―motives behind it…” — Amazon.com

“Miss Moriarty, I Presume” by Sherry Thomas — “When her enemy Moriarty asks her to find his daughter, Charlotte Holmes is led to a remote community of occult practitioners where Ms. Moriarty was last seen, a place of lies and liars, making her wonder why he has entrusted this delicate matter to her of all people. Original.” — Atlas Publishing

“Remembering the Dead” by Elizabeth J. Duncan — “This cozy contains numerous plot twists and is steeped in Welsh history, populated with full-bodied characters, and surrounded by lovingly described Welsh and Irish locales.” —Booklist

“The Coldest Case: A Bruno, Chief of Police Novel” by Martin Walker — “Packed with descriptions of the food Courrèges and his friends cook, of the gorgeous French countryside and of the local community, this book is pure escapism. . . . It is a delight to dip into [Bruno’s] sun-baked world.”The Observer (London)

“The Jealousy Man and Other Stories” by Jo Nesbo — “Nesbø delivers stories ranging from dystopian visions to time-honored tales of duplicity and revenge. . . . Wonderfully atmospheric. . . . He never runs out of ideas.”
Kirkus Reviews

ADULT NON-FICTION

“A Most Remarkable Creature: The Hidden Live and Epic Journey of the World’s Smartest Birds of Prey” by Jonathan Meiburg — “A first book by an award-winning natural-science writer introduces readers to the remarkable world of the caracaras social bird of prey, discussing how the species baffled Darwin and why it has remained confined to a small South American region. …” — Atlas Publishing

“A People’s Guide to Greater Boston” by Joseph Nevins — “It’s a timely, intelligent, and necessary guide, one that deepens our understanding of where we live now and reminds us of the power that regular citizens have to work against powers and systems that are, now as then, in urgent need of change.” Boston Globe

“America on Fire: The Untold Story of Police Violence and Black Rebellion Since the 1960s” by Elizabeth Hinton — “A must-read for all concerned with civil rights and social justice in modern America.”― Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Carving Out a Living on the Land: Lessons in Resourcefulmess and Craft from an Unusual Christmas Tree Farm” by Emmet Van Driesche — “The lessons here, cleanly told, serve the aspiring farmer, small business owner, and demonstrate not just how to run a farm, but how to build a sustainable and deeply satisfying life with the skills you have, and the ones you can learn.”―Boston Globe

“Collective Wisdom: Lessons, Inspiration and Advice from Women over 50” by Grace Bonney — “Grace Bonney is a force, she did it again. Her latest book, Collective Wisdom, celebrates . . . a richly diverse group of trailblazing women over 50. Ordered!” —Tina Roth Eisenberg, the Swiss Miss Newsletter for Everyone

“Crochet Colorwork Made Easy: Simple Techniques to Create Mulitcolor Sweater, Acessories and Home Décor” by Claire Goodale — “If you want to master colorwork crochet this book is a must. With clear instructions and beautiful, inspiring patterns you’ll be hooking in color in no time.”
Sarah Huntington, editor at Simply Crochet magazine

“Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence” by Anna Lembke — “[An] eye-opening survey on pleasure-seeking and addiction… Readers looking for balance will return to Lembke’s informative and fascinating guidance.” Publishers Weekly starred review

“Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest” by Suzanne Simard — “Vivid and inspiring . . . For Simard, personal experience leads to revelation, and scientific revelation leads to personal insight . . . Finding the Mother Tree helps make sense of a forest of mysteries. It might even persuade you that organisms other than ourselves—even fungi—have agency.”—Eugenia Bone, The Wall Street Journal

“Fiske Guide to Colleges 2022” by Edward B. Fiske — “The best college guide you can buy.”USA Today

“How to Invent Everything: A Survival Guide for the Stranded Time Traveler” by Ryan North — “Packed with cool, fun, and useful stuff… a friendly and thought-provoking reference, just the thing for the bright kid in the family, to say nothing of the neighborhood time traveler.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Life’s Edge” The Search for What It Means to be Alive” by Carl Zimmer — “From the struggle to define when life begins and ends to the hunt for how life got started, [Life’s Edge] offers an engaging, in-depth look at some of biology’s toughest questions.” Science News

“North American Maps for Curious Minds: 100 New Ways to See the Continent” by Matthew Bucklan — “Fascinating. . . . A captivating browse that will unobtrusively enlighten readers and upend things they thought they knew. . . . A great choice.” Library Journal

“Outlandish: Walking Europe’s Unlikely Landscapes” by Nick Hunt — “In Outlandish, acclaimed travel writer Nick Hunt takes us across landscapes that should not be there, wildernesses found in Europe yet seemingly belonging to far-off continents: a patch of Arctic tundra in Scotland; the continent’s largest surviving remnant of primeval forest in Poland and Belarus; Europe’s only true desert in Spain; and the fathomless grassland steppes of Hungary.” — Amazon.com

“Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat: Mastering the Elements of Good Cooking” by Samin Nosrat — “Just reading Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat will make you a better cook, adept at seasoning, balancing, understanding what it really is you’re doing and why… Make room on the bedside table—and the countertop.” ― Bon Appetit

“Taking of Jemima Boone: Colonial Settlers, Tribal Nations and the Kidnap that Shaped America” by Matthew Peal — “A deliciously intricate and utterly absorbing retelling of the Daniel Boone family saga–—and particularly the complex roles played by the Cherokee and Shawnee across Boone’s southern Appalachian stamping grounds. The Taking of Jemima Boone adds an intriguing dimension to an issue of keen importance to modern society.” — New York Times bestselling author Simon Winchester

“The Age of AI: And Our Human Future” by Henry A. Kissinger, Eric Schmidt and Daniel Huttenlocher with Schuyler Schouten — “Three leading thinkers put their heads together to explore artificial intelligence and how it will change our relationships with knowledge, politics, and the societies in which we live.” — Baker & Taylor

The Cause: The American Revolution and Its Discontents, 1773-1783″ by Joseph J. Ellis — “[A] speedy retelling of the nation’s stumbling, fractured founding, through evocative profiles of British loyalists, slaves, Native Americans and soldiers uncertain of what was being founded.”
Christopher Borrelli, Chicago Tribune

“The Code Breaker: Jennifer Doudna, Gene Editing and the Future of the Human Race” by Walter Isaacson —  “Deftly written, conveying the history of CRISPR and also probing larger themes: the nature of discovery, the development of biotech, and the fine balance between competition and collaboration that drives many scientists.”— New York Review of Books

“The Dawn of Everything: A New History of Humanity” by David Graeber —
“[The Dawn of Everything] took as its immodest goal nothing less than upending everything we think we know about the origins and evolution of human societies . . . [the book] aims to synthesize new archaeological discoveries of recent decades that haven’t made it out of specialist journals and into public consciousness.”―Jennifer Schuessler, New York Times

“The Extended Mind the Power of Thinking Outside the Brain” by Annie Murphy Paul — “The Extended Mind argues that our creativity, our intelligence, and even our memories are embodied not just in the wet matter of our brains, but in the world all around us. This is a profoundly interesting book that invites us to radically change how we think about thinking.”—Joshua Foer, author of Moonwalking with Einstein

“The Family Roe: An American Story” by Joshua Prager — “Mr. Prager’s book is stupendous, a masterwork of reporting…. If you want to understand Roe more deeply before the coming decision, read it.” ― Peggy Noonan, Wall Street Journal

“The Handcarved Bowl: Design & Create Custom Bowls From Scratch” by Danielle Rose Byrd — “The Handcarved Bowl provides step-by-step photos and directions for every stage of the bowlcarving process that will appeal to everyone from beginning woodworkers to seasoned carvers.” — Amazon.com

“The Quiet Zone: Unraveling the Mystery of a Town Suspended by Silence” by Stephen Kurczy — “Captivating. … A multilayered illustration of a unique community where things aren’t always what they seem.” — Kirkus Reviews

“Wilderness Axe Skills and Campcraft” by Paul Kirtley — “An easily understandable guide to key skills for bushcrafters, campers, outdoors lovers, and anyone interested in wilderness living.  …Through detailed explanations and step-by-step photo sequences, you too will be able to develop effective and timesaving campcraft skills using materials freely available in the woods, including pot hangers, tripods, cranes, and a variety of group camp set-ups. An indispensable addition to any bushcraft, woodcraft camping, and outdoor library.” — Amazon.com

BIOGRAPHY

“Crying in H Mart: A Memoir” by Michele Zauner — “Lyrical… Earnest… Zauner does a good job capturing the grief of losing a parent with pathos. Fans looking to get a glimpse into the inner life of this megawatt pop star will not be disappointed.”Publishers Weekly

“Invisible Child: Poverty, Survival & Hope in An American City” by Andrea Elliot — “Stunning . . . a remarkable achievement that speaks to the heart and conscience of a nation.”Publishers Weekly (starred review)

BLUE/DVD MOVIES

“Dear Evan Hansen”
“No Time to Die”
“Respect”

“Shang-chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings”

ITEMS

Old Stone House Museum Slate Kit
Small Skis

BOARD BOOK

“We Are Grateful” Otsaliheliga” by Traci Sorell

PICTURE BOOK

“A Friend Like You” by Frank Murphy and Charnaie Gordon
“Big Feelings” by Alexandra Penfold
“It Fell From the Sky” by Fan Brothers
“Mistletoe: A Christmas Story” by Tad Hills
“Moose’s Book Bus” by Inga Moore
“Mr. Watson’s Chickens” by Jarrett Dapier
“My 2 Border Towns” by David Bowles
“Our Table” by Peter J. Reynolds
“Ten Ways to Hear Snow” by Cathy Camper
“The 1619 Project: Born on the Water” by Nikloe Hannah-Jones & Renee Watson
“The Barnabus Project” by Terry Fan
“The Nutcracker” by Jan Brett
“Where is the Buddha?” by Thich Nhat Hanh
“Winter Dance” by Dane Bauer

JUVENILE BIOGRAPHY

“I Am An American: The Wong Kim Ark Story” by Martha Brockenbrough — “Kuo’s fine-lined digital art, gracefully employing reds, blues, and browns, presents an immersive backdrop to this solid historical primer, which also resonates in the present day.”―Publishers Weekly

JUVENILE DVD

Paw Patrol: The Movie”

JUVENILE FICTION

“Charlies Thorne and the Last Equation” by Stuart Gibbs — “Charlie is a terrific hero—outrageously smart, courageous, and still believable as a kid. After this explosive start, young readers will eagerly await her next adventure.” ― Publishers Weekly

“Cursed Carnival and Other Calamaties” by Rick Riordan and others — “I hope you enjoy your trip through the multiverse mansion as much as I did. The real danger is that once you start exploring all the wonders herein, you may want to stay forever.”–Rick Riordan

“How to Train Your Dad” by Gary Paulsen — “The tall-tale, anecdotal quality of Carl’s story is entertaining with its recitation of disastrous, smelly, embarrassing, dangerous, and misguided moments . . . Funny, sure-handed, wise.” ―Kirkus Reviews

“Paul Santiago and the River of Tears” by Tehlor Kay Mejia — “This fast-paced journey into Latinx folklore, with its clever protagonist, is sure to keep readers turning pages into the night.” – Booklist (starred review)

“Wings of Fire: The Dangerous Gift” by Tui T. Sutherland — “Using rare magic to secure the boundaries around her kingdom, Queen Snowfall gives asylum to refugee dragons of uncertain trustworthiness before considering a high-risk alternate plan to escort hostile tribes out of IceWing territory” — Atlas Publishing

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Saving Sorya: Chang and the Sun Bear” by Trang Nguyen — “Uplifting . . . the epitome of wild and free. . . . Breathtaking visuals and a compelling story.”Kirkus Reviews, starred review

JUVENILE NON-FICTION

“A Peacemaker for Warring Nations: The Founding of the Iroquois League” by Joseph Bruchac — “In A Peacemaker for Warring Nations, renowned Native author Joseph Bruchac draws from the teachings of both contemporary and past Iroquois tradition bearersin telling the story of how “the Peacemaker,” a divine messenger sent by the Creator, helped to bring an end to the bitter warring of the Five Iroquois Nations and how he founded the famed League of the Iroquois, which was later to influence the US Constitution.” — Annotation

“Celebrate Your Body (And Its Changes, Too!)” by Sonya Renee Taylor — “Taylor’s book unapologetically leads with the positive, focusing much more on what bodies can do rather than what they look like. Even with that focus, Taylor manages to hammer home that all bodies are beautiful, that it’s possible to be healthy at every size, and that each body progresses at its own rate…”―Rachelle Hampton, slate.com

“Nature Play at Home: Creating Outdoor Spaces that Connect Children with the Natural World” by Nancy Striniste — “With Striniste’s guidance, natural playscapes can awaken the senses, challenge bodies, inspire imagination, build confidence, and create comfort for all ages. Nature Play at Home is sure to Inspire readers to take action in their backyards and encourage creative play in nature for years to come.” Booklist

“Water: A Deep Dive of Discovery” by Christy Mihaly — “…This comprehensive yet accessible exploration of water will help young readers understand many aspects of one of our planet’s most precious resources – and how they can protect it. A friendly water droplet character guides children through topics ranging from melting and freezing to the ways in which water literally shapes the Earth. Tales by storytellers from around the world are sprinkled through the book, highlighting the variety of ways in which global cultures value water. The engaging format includes gatefolds and booklets with hands-on activity ideas for learning about and protecting water. ” — Annotation

“Women’s Right to Vote” by Kate Messner — “An engaging introduction to the real stories behind the fight for women’s voting rights combines fun facts with graphic panels, sidebars and more to challenge popular misconceptions and reveal what suffragists actually endured for the sake of voting equality.” — Atlas Publishing