Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – DECEMBER 2022

ADULT FICTION

“After Lives” by Abdulrazak Gurnah — “An appreciation for quiet, ordinary forms of heroism runs throughout. . . . One can take away lessons and meanings from this novel, yet such things are perhaps less significant than the sheer seeming realness of the characters, whose presences Mr. Gurnah has faithfully crafted into existence, with all of their dreaming, their sorrow and their resilience.”—Wall Street Journal

“Four Treasures of the Sky” by Jenny Tinghui Zhang — “Fierce and moving…Zhang delves into the history of violence and prejudice against Chinese people in the U.S. with her debut, a lyrical and sweeping Bildungsroman…The author skillfully delineates the many characters and offers fascinating details on Chinese calligraphy and literature, along with an unsparing view of white supremacy.” ―Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“No Land to Light” by Yara Zgheib — “Zgheib’s prose is sensory, piquant with the scent of spices even as it captures the sorrow of living in exile while war destroys your homeland. But the novel’s real power is in humanizing the cruelties and injustices visited on migrants caught up in the travel ban.” ― Library Journal (starred)

“The Book of Goose” by Yiyun Li — “This is a novel of deceptions and cruelty . . . But within this somber mood is something brilliant. With characteristic poise, Li depicts the intricacies of ordinary lives: childhood friendship, growing up, and existences as slow as the passively ‘floating’ geese Agnès watches.” ―Francesca Peacock, The Spectator

“The Boys from Biloxi” by John Grisham — “John Grisham returns to Mississippi with the riveting story of two sons of immigrant families who grow up as friends, but ultimately find themselves on opposite sides of the law. Grisham’s trademark twists and turns will keep you tearing through the pages until the stunning conclusion.” — Amazon.com

“The Dead Romantics” by Ashley Poston — “Romance, chaos, and complications are central components in Poston’s refreshingly fun, spirited rom-coms, and The Dead Romantics is no exception. The beauty and charm of Poston’s storytelling continues to make miraculous happy endings out of the messes in which ordinary people often find themselves entangled.” —Shelf Awareness

“The Dreamtime” by Mstyslav Chernov — “Chernov is a singular voice writing about Ukraine today, and The Dreamtime is essential reading to understanding the ways that war has infiltrated people’s everyday lives far beyond the front lines. It is an ambitious novel that draws together diverse perspectives to reflect the raw emotions of life and death.” ― Emily Channell-Justice, Director, Temerty Contemporary Ukraine Program

“The Flight Portfolio” by Julie Orringer — “Magnificent . . . a deeply researched, almost unbearably tense, bruised-knuckle hybrid. Part real history and part love story, it’s also a deeply moral work, asking tough questions about what matters most to us personally—and to the world.” — The Boston Globe

“The Latecomer” by Jean Hanff Korelitz — “If this novel is funny, it is also cutting, a nearly forensic study of family conflict. Husband and wife are at odds; children pull away not only from their parents but from one another. Nimbly, Korelitz juggles the stories of each parent and child, weaving a tapestry of secrets, antipathies and private quests. … It’s testament to Korelitz’s achievement that her novel leaves us wanting more.” ―New York Times Book Review

“The Light Pirate” by Lily Brooks-Dalton — “A formidable young woman’s coming-of-age . . . Brooks-Dalton creates an all-too-believable picture of nature reclaiming Florida from its human inhabitants, and her complex and engaging characters make climate disaster a vividly individual experience rather than an abstract subject of debate.”―Kirkus, Starred Review

“The Rabbit Hutch” by Tess Gunty — “Ambitious . . . Despite offering a dissection of contemporary urban blight, the novel doesn’t let social concerns crowd out the individuality of its characters, and Blandine’s off-kilter brilliance is central to the achievement.”—The New Yorker

“The Reindeer Hunters” by Lars Mytting — “…Pastor Kai Schweigaard is haunted by the past; he was responsible for the loss of the village’s ancient stave church and its sister bells cast in the 1600s in memory of two famous weavers, conjoined twin sisters. These twins created the Hekne Weave, a tapestry depicting Skrapanatta, the end of days. While Schweigaard searches for the Weave and what it might portend, Jehans, a Hekne and son of Schweigaard’s lost love, struggles to make his way. Butangen lingers in the grip of feudalism, but change is inevitable. This novel explores themes of modernization and identity on various levels: national (Norway’s separation from its union with Sweden), familial, and religious (Norse myth and Christianity). The world Mytting creates is immersive, including descriptions of reindeer hunting and the feel of a scythe on a whetstone. The result is a fascinating story with centuries-old echoes, their muted peal resonating like the separated sister bells.” — Bethany Latham. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2022. — Booklist

“The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida” by Shehan Karunatilaka — “Comic, macabre, angry and thumpingly alive… [Maali’s voice] has bite, brilliance, and sparkle… Still, the furious comedy in Mr. Karunatilaka’s novel never courts despair.”― Economist

“The Whalebone Theatre” by Joanna Quinn — “What’s remarkable, especially for a first novel, is Quinn’s deft way of depicting this lost world—whether a subsiding seaside aristocracy or a training school for British agents or a Parisian theater in wartime . . . Her vision is so fine and fully realized that it’s hard to imagine her doing anything else—and hard to have to wait to see what that might be.” —Washington Post

ADULT MYSTERY

“A World of Curiosities” by Louise Penny — “Penny delves into the nature of evil, sensitively exploring the impact of the dreadful events she describes while bringing a warmth and humanity to her disparate cast of characters that, unusually for a crime novel, leaves you feeling better about the world once you’ve finished.” ―The Guardian

“All Good People Here” by Ashley Flowers — “All Good People Here has enough twists and layers for three novels. Ashley Flowers has taken a premise familiar to true-crime fans and created a story that’s compelling and psychologically rich, with an ending that’s as unnerving as it is satisfying.” —Lou Berney

“City on Fire” by Don Winslow — “A masterwork of mob fiction. . . City on Fire does for Rhode Island what David Chase’s The Sopranos did for New Jersey. . . It’s Winslow’s ways with character, as well as his fluid narrative and highly visual scene-setting, that suggest this novel, the first in a planned trilogy, could well end up in the American-mob canon along with the works of Puzo, Scorsese and Chase.” — Washington Post

“Going Rogue” by Janet Evanovich — “Full of surprises, thrills, and humor, Going Rogue reveals a new side of Stephanie Plum, and shows Janet Evanovich at her scorching, riotous best.” — Amazon.com

“The Bangalore Detectives” by Harini Nagendra — “The first in an effervescent new mystery series by the ecology professor Harini Nagendra, The Bangalore Detectives Club turns the clock back a century. This is a treat for historical mystery lovers looking for a new series to savor (or devour).” — Sarah Weinman ― The New York Times Book Review

“The Bullets that Missed” by Richard Osman — “The Bullet That Missed hits on every front. Its quandaries stymie, its solutions thrill, its banter is worth reciting and its characters exemplify an admirable camaraderie. One can only hope that the Thursday Murder Club’s next outing appears before long.” —Wall Street Journal

The Secrets of Winter” by Nicola Upson — “A truly brilliant twist…yet, it is the quality of writing that makes this pulpy novel not just for Christmas but for life.” —The UK Times

“The Twist of a Knife” by Anthony Horowitz — “In New York Times bestselling author Anthony Horowitz’s ingenious fourth literary whodunit following The Word is Murder, The Sentence is Death, and A Line to Kill, Horowitz becomes the prime suspect in a murder investigation—and only one man can prove his innocence: his newly estranged partner in solving crime, Detective Hawthorne.” — Publisher Annotation

“The Unkempt Woman” by Allison Montclair — “Exemplary… Montclair’s capable, funny, and fully developed leads set a gold standard.” –-Publishers Weekly (starred review)

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“Alzheimer’s Canyon: One Couple’s Reflections on Living with Dementia” by Jane Dwinell & Sky Yardley — “… Jane Dwinell and Sky Yardley take us on a journey with them into the uncharted world of Alzheimer’s Disease. They bravely navigate the depths of Alzheimer’s Canyon, shining a light in a disorienting landscape. Their unflinching honesty about their lived experience serves as an emotional road map for anyone facing an unexpected challenge. Out of her grief, Dwinell offers this gift, and hope.” –David Goodman, bestselling author and host of The Vermont Conversation

“And There Was Light: Abraham Lincoln and the American Struggle” by John Meacham — “Biography at its best, the great historian Barbara Tuchman wrote, paints an intimate portrait of an individual which simultaneously provides a sweeping view of history. With this deep, compelling work, Jon Meacham has achieved this gold standard. Written with wisdom and grace, his story of Lincoln’s complex moral journey to Emancipation mirrors America’s long quest to live up to its founding ideals.” —Doris Kearns Goodwin

“Sigh, Gone: A Misfit’s Memoir of Great Books, Punk Rock and the Fight to Fit In” by Phuc Tran — “Funny, poignant, and unsparing, Tran’s sharp, sensitive, punk-inflected memoir presents one immigrant’s quest for self-acceptance through the lens of American and European literary classics. A highly witty and topical read―an impressive debut.” ―Kirkus (starred review)

“The Light We Carry: Overcoming in Uncertain Times” by Michelle Obama —
“Obama’s road map for uncertain times resonates in ways that other self-help books do not. . . . Through her stories, experiences and thoughts, we’re finding the light with her.” —The New York Times  

ADULT NON-FICTION

“15-Minute Ink Landscapes: Simple, Striking, Soothing Lineart of Forests, Mountains, Beaches and More” by Rosa Hoehn — “15-Minute Ink Landscapes is a great guide for beginners looking to get comfortable with drawing different nature-based designs. Rosa offers solid tips and guided examples along the way. I highly recommend this book!” ― Jason Yates, artist and founder of @Jy.Ink

“Best Road Trips Ontario & Quebec: Escapes on the Open Road” by Shawn Duthie & others — “The Perfect Choice: Lonely Planet’s Ontario & Quebec’s Best Road Trips is perfect for exploring Ontario and Quebec via the road and discovering sights that are more accessible by car.” — Amazon.com

“Dorie’s Cookies” by Dorie Greenspan — “Dorie has written the perfect book to satisfy the Cookie Monster in all of us. These recipes are both classic and inventive and totally delicious.” — Ina Garten, Barefoot Contessa cookbooks and television

“From Scratch: Adventures in Harvesting, Hunting, Fishing and Foraging on a Fragile Planet” by David & Jon Moscow — “This is delicious, adventuresome entertainment for the mind, soul, heart, and stomach. A dynamic, ruminative journal for food lovers and armchair globe-trotters.” — Kirkus Review

“Psychology of Positive Aging” by Ellen Heuven — “While it is undeniable that certain physical functions start to decline from a certain age, both the life stories of the interviewees and scientific literature show that psychological functioning can become more robust into old age. The women in this book are inspiring role models who show how you can grow, live a fulfilling live and achieve goals, not so much DESPITE but WITH or THANKS to aging.” — Amazon.com

“Turning Bowls with Richard Raffan” by Richard Raffan — “The worlds pre-eminent woodturning teacher provides everything you need to know to turn bowls. Richard Raffan draws upon his 30 plus years of experience to lead you through the key elements — from planning to completion.” — Amazon.com

PICTURE BOOK

“You Are Never Alone” by Elin Kelsey

JUVENILE FICTION

“Mapmaker” by Lisa Moore Ramee — “This is an exciting adventure full of friendship and heart with a likable nerdy-Black-kid protagonist…. Readers will enjoy the well-drawn characters as well as the fantastical landscapes and imaginative creatures in Walt’s magical world.” — Horn Book Magazine

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Bobo and Pup-Pup: Let’s Make Cake” by Vikram Madan — “This hilarious and relatable graphic chapter book will have kids ages 5-8 laughing out loud while gaining confidence in reading.” — Amazon.com

“Bobo and Pup-Pup: The Funny Book” by Vikram Madan — “A super funny book has Pup-Pup literally laughing out loud!! Bobo wants to read it so he can laugh too, but he must wait till Pup-Pup is finished. But the more Pup-Pup laughs, the harder it is to wait! All kids know that waiting is not easy!! What happens when Bobo’s patience runs out and he takes matters into his own hands?” — Amazon.com

“Bobo and Pup-Pup: We Love Bubbles” by Vikram Madan — “Grab some bubble mix and join Pup-Pup and Bobo for a good read.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Bunnicula” by James Howe — “Before it’s too late, Harold the dog and Chester the cat must find out the truth about the newest pet in the Monroe household — a suspicious-looking bunny with unusual habits… and fangs!” — GoodReads

“Cat Kid: Comic Club Collaborations” by Dav Pilkey — “Excitement and imagination run wild as Naomi, Melvin, Poppy, Gilbert, Curly, and their siblings get back to making comics with originality and laughter. But wait — have they cleaned their rooms yet?!” — Amazon.com

“Cat Kid: Comic Club on Purpose” by Dav Pilkey — “…. Here exploring the concept of purpose, Pilkey lets characters and readers ponder its complexity–with butt jokes keeping the tone light. While its theme is not as clearly developed as the previous volume’s, this episode nevertheless presents the series’ now-trademark winning mix of sibling hijinks and club members’ comics, rendered in a variety of styles.” — Kirkus Media LLC

“Cat’s Cradle: The Golden Twine” by Jo Rioux — “At times vividly hair-raising, the book never overwhelms the reader, making it a worthy entry in the too-small category of scary fun for middle grade readers… Thanks to Rioux’s crackerjack pace and dramatic panel composition, The Golden Twine is hard to put down.”―New York Times

“Crush” by Svetlana Chmakova — “Jorge seems to have it all together. He’s big enough that nobody really messes with him, but he’s also a genuinely sweet guy with a solid, reliable group of friends. The only time he ever really feels off his game is when he crosses paths with a certain girl… But when the group dynamic among the boys starts to shift, will Jorge be able to balance what his friends expect of him versus what he actually wants?” — Amazon.com

“Deep into the Amazon Jungle” by James O. Fraioli — “Vibrant and dramatic illustrations accompany this riverside adventure that introduces young readers to the diverse populations that reside in the Amazon. Kids will also learn about the consequences of deforestation for our entire planet—as well as the numerous ways that every person can do their share to preserve our forests, reduce waste, and help the environment.” — Amazon.com

“Enemies” by Svetlana Chmakova — “Felicity’s sure she’s going to do something big. Exactly what is still a mystery, but she’ll figure it out. Her sister, Letty, teases Felicity that she never finishes stuff, but that’s just because Letty is so perfect. Still, life is good with plenty of friends—drawing with the art club and playing games with her buddies keep her busy. But when she decides to join a contest to show Letty that she can get things done, Felicity begins to wonder if friends becoming enemies is easier than she thought. Are they really enemies, though…? What does it even mean to be enemies? And…who is it that she needs the most on her side…?” — Amazon.com

“Freestyle” by Gale Galligan — “A visually kinetic, emotionally complex story of finding a sense of self while navigating relationships and expectations. Fun and full of heart.” — School Library Journal, starred review

“Frizzy” by Claribel A. Ortega — “In the creators’ graphic novel debut, themes of anti-Blackness, colorism, and self-acceptance are explored with ­nuance and honesty. The subject of internalized racism is discussed in a way that will resonate with kids and families grappling with it for the first time.” ―School Library Journal, starred review

“Great White Shark Adventure” by James O. Fraioli — “This series opener will appeal most to young shark and science enthusiasts.” ― Booklist

“Green Lantern: Alliance” By Minh Le — “Tai Pham struggles with balancing school, his work in the family business, his friendships, and his new Green Lantern responsibilities. But Kid Flash arrives on the scene to become the super-hero partner Tai just might need.” — Amazon.com

“Hawai’i Sea Turtle Rescue” by James O. Fraioli — “Dive deep into this colorful and informative graphic novel adventure that brings readers up close and personal with the sea creatures of the vast and beautiful Pacific Ocean. Along the way, kids will also see how pollution and climate change can impact entire underwater ecosystems and find actionable steps that they can take to reduce waste and protect these precious reefs.” — Amazon.com

“I Survived the Nazi Invasion, 1944” by Lauren Tarshis — “… Lauren Tarshis’s New York Times bestselling I Survived series takes on vivid new life in this explosive graphic novel edition. Includes nonfiction back matter with historical photos and facts about World War II and the Holocaust.” — Amazon.com

“Investigators: Heist and Seek” by John Patrick Green — “Mango and Brash go undercover and under canvas as internationally renowned painters to expose a crook who has truly mastered the art of CRIME! Can they recover the missing masterpieces and save the city art museum’s fundraising gala before it’s too late…and they run out of appetizers? Find out in this latest pièce de résistance of action-packed illustrated fun.” — Amazon.com

“Invisible” by Christina Diaz Gonzalez & Gabriela Epstein — “Invisible celebrates individuality and community while transcending language barriers.” – Bookpage, starred review

“Journey Under the Arctic” by James O. Fraioli — “Join the team on this deep-sea expedition, and learn how the changing climate affects the ocean and its inhabitants, and discover what you can do to help save the planet!” — Amazon.com

“Leon the Extraordinary” by Jamar Nicholas — “In the city where Leon lives, superheroes — and supervillains — are commonplace. So how does an ordinary kid like Leon, who has no superpowers himself, become the superhero he wants to be? When all his classmates suddenly become obsessed with a new phone app that turns them into zombies, Leon gets his chance to prove that using his brain and following his heart can save the day.” — Amazon.com

“Miles Morales: Stranger Tides” by Justin A. Reynolds — “Miles Morales has just about gotten used to this being Spider-Man thing. Keeping Brooklyn safe, taking down bad guys, and finishing his homework―he’s got this! But when Spider-Man is invited to a launch for a brand-new video game, things go sideways fast. Anyone who plays the game is frozen, and it’s all because of a villain named the Stranger. He’s judged humanity and found it lacking, and his idea of justice is extreme.” — Amazon.com

“My Aunt is a Monster” by Reimena Yee —  “Safia is an irresistible lead, and her innate sense of wonder and longing for adventure… is heartwarming to the very last page.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Nat Enough” by Maria Scrivan — “What elevates Maria Scrivan’s graphic novel is the refreshing honesty with which it approaches its subject matter. The tone is instructive but not preachy, as Natalie develops her talents as a cartoonist and discovers her individuality, which brings her not only the acceptance of others but, more importantly, self-acceptance.” — Financial Times

“Nico Bravo and the Cellar Dwellers” by Mike Cavallaro — “Orcus mistakenly unleashes a dangerous ‘Misery’ from the God of Misfortune’s pouch, threatening everyone in the Supply Shop, but also discovers the missing link between Nico, the Unicorn Wars, and Reality itself! What will happen to Nico and his friends when all their troubles converge in a desperate battle for the fate of the Universe?” — Amazon.com

“Nico Bravo and the Hound of Hades” by Mike Cavallaro — “But Nico’s world is about to be turned upside down, and it’s all thanks his latest customer: Eowulf, the pint-size descendant of the monster slayer Beowulf. Determined to carry on the family business, this would-be warrior plans to slay Cerberus, the terrifying, three-headed hound of Hades. There’s just one problem―Cerberus is the only thing preventing the hordes of the Underworld from entering the land of the living. Can Nico stop Eowulf from unleashing a zombie apocalypse?” — Amazon.com

“Nico Bravo and the Trial of Vulcan” by Mike Cavallaro — “Awesome fight sequences, imaginative onomatopoeia, and nonstop hilarity make for a brightly colored, fast-paced saga…Another on-brand entry in this fun, melting pot of mythologies.”―School Library Journal

“Prunella and the Cursed Skull Ring” by Matthew Loux — “This fun and spooky adventure has a twist that readers do not want to miss, and it serves as an effective and playful reminder to not judge based on appearances, encouraging young readers to be their most authentic selves.”―Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books

“Shark Princess” by Nidhi Chanani — “A finny, funny foray that encourages inclusivity even when it comes to play.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Sir Ladybug” by Corey R. Tabor — “Visual humor, tongue-in-cheek declarations, and knock-knock jokes add to the fun absurdity of a story that subverts the natural phenomenon of a bird eating a bug. An endearing testament to the joys of friendship.” — Kirkus Reviews

“Sir Ladybug and the Bookworms” by Corey R. Tabor — “Tabor keeps the laughs coming in this new addition to his wonderful graphic-reader series. Though the bookish jokes and underlying message about everyone being welcome at the library will make it a particular favorite among librarians, kids will get a kick out of the story’s elevation of a common scenario…into a full-blown quest.” — Booklist

“Sir Ladybug and the Queen Bee” by Corey R. Tabor -“A gentle but fiercely loyal ladybug knight is joined by his faithful herald (a roly-poly bug who gets a little nervous sometimes but loves to loudly tell anyone who’ll listen how great his friends are) and his steed/squire (a snail with a surprisingly spacious shell and a love of adventure) in Tabor’s first two installments of a graphic-novel series for the early-reader set. …” — The Horn Book-

“Smaller Sister” by Maggie Edkins Willis — “The accessible tone and format allow a difficult topic to be gently revealed with painful honesty balanced by humor and silliness… Compassionately approaches the stigma and mystery surrounding eating disorders.” ―Kirkus, starred review

“The Bad Guys in the Others?!” by Aaron Blabey — “This book instantly joins the classic ranks of Captain Underpants and The Stinky Cheese Man. We challenge anyone to read this and keep a straight face.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“The Cardboard Kingdom” by Chad Sell — “Readers may be inspired to craft their own cardboard kingdom after finishing the book. A must-have.”—School Library Journal, starred review

“The Cool Code” by Deirdre Langeland — “A humorous exploration of cracking the middle school social code for anyone craving more personified snarky llamas in their lives.” — School Library Journal

“The First Cat in Space Ate Pizza” by Mac Barnett — “Readers looking for the outer space high jinks and gentle humor of Brockington’s Catstronauts and the imaginative and fantastical worldbuilding of Andrews’s This Was Our Pact need look no further than this laugh-out-loud tale of the first cat in space.” — School Library Journal (starred review)

“The Wondrous Wonders” by Camille Jourdy — “This is a must-buy for any library, packed with humor and heart.” ―School Library Journal

“Wings of Fire: Moon Rising” by Tui Sutherland — “Peace has finally settled on the kingdom of Pyrrhia. The former “dragonets of destiny” have started an academy for young dragons like themselves. One promising student, Moonwatcher, begins to discover her own secret powers and must decide if she should use them when the academy is threatened.” — THE HORN BOOK, c2015.

YOUNG ADULT FICTION

“Anne of Greenville” by Mariko Tamaki — “Every page of this glittery disco ball of a book explodes with imagination, effervescence, and joy ― prepare to find a kindred spirit in this thoroughly modern Anne Shirley.”―Sarah Kuhn, author of From Little Tokyo, with Love

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

“A Quick & Easy Guide to Asexuality” by Molly Muldoon & Will Hernandez — “This is a clear-cut primer for readers looking to support an ace person in their own life or those questioning their own identity.” ― Publishers Weekly

“Arden High: Twelfth Grade Night” by Molly Booth — “High school pranks, youthful dialogue, and a bright color palette make for a fun and inviting comedy to dive into, and a charismatic supporting cast offers plenty of material for more Shakespearean hijinks in future volumes.” ―The Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books (starred review)

“Coming Back” by Jessi Zarbarsky — “A beautiful story of two young women who are so focused on proving they’re meant to be together that they end up hurting each other in the process. This gorgeous graphic novel is an LGTBQ+ romance about young love and how it can grow into something strong no matter what obstacles get in the way.” — Amazon.com

“Demon in the Wood” by Leigh Bardugo & Dani Pendergast — “An absolutely vital addition to the Shadow and Bone world…centering on the Darkling when he was just a boy, this tragic and beautiful story adds layers to the villain we know and the scared child he once was.” ― Nerdist

“Dinosaur Sanctuary” by Itaru Kinoshita — “A richly detailed manga about a rookie zookeeper learning how to care for dinosaurs of all shapes and sizes, sure to delight dinosaur lovers!” — Amazon.com

“Giantess: The Story of the Girl who Traveled the World in Search of Freedom” by J. C. Deveney — “A giant baby girl is found and adopted by a local family who bring her back to their village. She grows to become an even bigger giant, learning life’s lessons complicated even further by her enormous size and uniqueness. Can she weather a society that faces her with frightened hostility and prejudice to find live and, ultimately, the freedom to be herself? A wonderous, fantastical tale of feminism, difference, love, freedom, and the quest to be oneself.” — Publisher Annotation:

“Lore of Olympus: Volume Three” by Rachel Smythe — “If eyes could eat, [Lore Olympus] would be a feast. Smythe’s artistic style features bright washes of color and bold, suggestive lines. . . . It’s paced as a soap opera, all drawn-out tensions and long-simmering secrets, and I, for one, am thrilled to be along for the ride.”—New York Times Book Review

“Passport” by Sophia Glock — “A rare peek behind the curtain into life as the daughter of U.S. intelligence officers, this is a story full of secrets that expertly unfold one by one. …”―School Library Journal

“The Heartstopper Yearbook” by Alice Oseman — “Realistic yet uplifting, this tale of self-discovery will make readers’ hearts skip a beat.” — School Library Journal

“Tuki: Fight for Fire” by Jeff Smith — “Fans of classic adventure will not be disappointed… Smith (BONE) goes prehistoric in this fabulously drawn anthropological fantasy…. the characters and scenery remain consistently stunning to gaze at, page after page.” — PUBLISHERS WEEKLY

YOUNG ADULT NON-FICTION

“Braiding Sweetgrass for Young Adults: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants” by Robin Wall Kimmerer — “With informative sidebars, reflection questions, and art from illustrator Nicole Neidhardt, Braiding Sweetgrass for Young Adults brings Indigenous wisdom, scientific knowledge, and the lessons of plant life to a new generation.” — Amazon.com

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – NOVEMBER 2022

ADULT FICTION

“Hester” by Laurie Lico Albanese — “”This thoughtfully researched tale shines a light on the barriers faced by 19th-century women who did not conform.” ––Washington Post

“Secluded Cabin Sleeps Six” by Lisa Unger — “Embedded in a riveting novel of suspense is a revealing examination of the dangers inherent in public DNA sharing…[Lisa Unger] is in good form here, in her twentieth outing, and her fans will be eager to dive right in.” —Booklist

“The Inn at Tansy Falls” by Cate Woods — “A heartfelt contemporary about life, loss, and love that will utterly charm and delight readers and leave them clamoring for a follow-up.”―Booklist, Starred Review

“The Last Chairlift” by John Irving — “Here the consistent pleasure is an extended family whose distinctive voices deliver thoughtful messages of tolerance, understanding, and affection for those who are different.”—KIRKUS REVIEWS

“The Passenger” by Cormac McCarthy — “A rich story of an underachieving salvage diver in 1980 New Orleans… This thriller narrative is intertwined with the story of Western’s sister, Alicia… He dazzles with his descriptions of a beautifully broken New Orleans… The book’s many pleasures will leave readers aching for the final installment.”  —Publishers Weekly

“The Perfect Assassin” by James Patterson — “Grandson of action hero Doc Savage, nerdy professor Brandt Savage is pressed into a top-secret training program that re-creates him mentally and physically as The Perfect Assassin…” — LIBRARY JOURNAL, c2022.

ADULT MYSTERY

“The Butcher and the Wren” by Alaina Urquhart — ‘Urquhart has crafted a thriller that is necessarily graphic but not exploitative. The crisp detail, the narrative brevity and the blade-sharp connections between the pathologist and the killer all bode well for future installments.” —Sarah Weinman, New York Times

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“A Place Called Home” by David Ambroz — “[A] captivating debut…Galvanizing and compassionate, this personal account of survival should be required reading.”―Publishers Weekly

“Being Heumann: An Unrepentant Memoir of Disability Rights Activist” by Judith Heumann with Kristen Joiner — “Consider this book an inspiring call for inclusiveness, courage, equity, and justice as well as a reminder of people’s power to change the world for the better.” —Booklist

“Dying of Politeness” by Geena Davis — “Academy Award winner Davis makes an engaging literary debut with a candid, appealing memoir recounting her evolution from self-effacing young woman to feisty activist … An entertaining and ebullient memoir.” — Kirkus Reviews

“Invisible Storm: A Soldier’s Memoir of Politics and PTSD” by Jason Kander– “Kander displays a level of vulnerability not often seen in political memoirs, offering a bracing portrait of untreated PTSD and an insightful psychological profile of political ambition. Readers will appreciate the candor of this harrowing tale.” — Publishers Weekly

“Path Lit by Lightning: A Life by Jim Thorpe” by David Maraniss — “In the new biography Path Lit by Lightning, David Maraniss details the enormous odds that a Native American hero had to overcome. . . . He insists that taken as a whole, Jim Thorpe’s story is not one of prejudice, nor the hypocrisy of others. . . . [And] emphasizes that whatever life took from him, Thorpe persisted and trained and worked and learned and succeeded.” — Keith Olbermann ― The New York Times Book Review

“Somewhere Sisters: A Story of Adoption, Identity, and the Meaning of Family” by Erika Hayaskaki — “Hayasaki explores the many dimensions of transracial and transnational adoption in this moving account of families torn apart.”  ―The Cut

“Stay True” by Hua Hsu — “A moving portrait of friends, death, doubt, and everything in between. . . Hsu writes with tenderness but scorching precision. . . Genuinely one of the most moving portraits of friendship to have come out in recent years.” —The Nation

“Uncertain Fruit: A Memoir of Infertility, Loss and Love” by Rebecca and Sallyann Majoya — “A candid, unflinching look at a couple’s struggle to have a child of their own…By taking turns telling their story, moving back and forth in time and place, they have produced a skillfully woven narrative.” — Linda Peavy, poet and co-author of Frontier House

ADULT NON-FICTION

“A Girlhood: Letter to my Transgender Daughter” by Carolyn Hayes — “Hays here presents a different view of God—as a being of pure love that would never consider her daughter a mistake, but instead, a gift.”—Oprah Daily

“Art of Knitting Hats: 30 Easy-to-Follow Patterns to Create Your Own Colorwork Masterpiece” by Courtney Flynn — “This is a knitter’s dream introduction to colorwork! The designs in this book are whimsical, fun and sure to keep any knitter engaged from start to finish.” – Tif Neilan, creator of Tif Handknits

“Best Bike Rides in New England: Backroad Routes for Cycling the Northeast States” by David Sobel — “The Northeast provides some of the most exciting cycling in the United States: sweeping vistas, seaside towns, fall colors, and more. With this comprehensive guide, New Hampshire local David Sobel offers up rides in Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Maine.” — Amazon.com

“Ejaculate Responsibly: A Whole New Way to Think About Abortion” by Gabrielle Stanley Blair

“Forever Home: How We Turned our House Into a Haven for Abandoned, Abused and Misunderstood Dogs and Each Other” by Ron Danta — “… unforgettable, gut-wrenching story of how authors Robertshaw and Danta opened their hearts, homes, lives, and wallets to rescue over 13,000 dogs…. These two angels disguised as humans offer so much hope and love for animals—and invaluable lessons for readers.” — Booklist (starred review)

“Glucose Revolution: The Life Changing Power of Balancing Your Blood Sugar” by Jessie Inchauspe — “I hugely enjoyed reading this book; Jessie offers a detailed understanding of the problem which faces so many of us – how to balance our blood sugar levels – along with simple and accessible science-based hacks which really could help you transform your health.” —MICHAEL MOSLEY, M.D.,  #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Fast Diet

“No Choice: The Destruction of Roe V. Wade and the Fight to Protect a Fundamental American Right” by Becca Andrews — “Necessary in its racial and gender inclusivity, this thoughtful book will appeal to anyone looking to understand the way forward in a post-Roe world…An important book on a timely topic.”―Kirkus

“Playing God in the Meadow: How I Learned to Admire My Weeds” by Martha Leb Molnar — “A thoughtful tale of making a meadow, from a gardener who is not afraid to struggle with questions botanical and environmental.”―Sydney Landon Plum, author of Solitary Goose

“Smitten Kitchen Keepers: New Classics for Your Forever Files” by Deb Perelman — “Smitten Kitchen is not just a food blog: it is the food blog.” —The New Yorker

“Space Craze: America’s Enduring Fascination with Real and Imagined Spaceflight” by Margaret A. Weitekamp — “Weitekamp has produced an important book on the first great pillar of space travel: science fiction and the power of imagination. In a readable yet detailed manner, Weitekamp cleverly employs museum artifacts to reveal the ways objects capture elements of national identity and confirms once again that modern space travel is as much about the past as about the future.”—Howard McCurdy, author of Space and the American Imagination

“The Complete Modern Pantry: 350+ Ways to Cook Well with What’s on Hand” — “Flexibility is at the core of pantry cooking—when every cook needs to improvise. This unique guidehelps you get the most out of your own pantry by showing how ingredients add crunch, acid, umami, or spice to a dish.” — Amazon.com

“The Extraordinary Life of an Ordinary” by Paul Newman — “Raw reflections from a movie icon…a revealing memoir of a life marked by pain, grief, and regret…Intimate reflections on an extraordinary life steeped in sadness.” —Kirkus Reviews

“The Sleep Prescription: Seven Days to Unlocking Your Best Rest” by Aric A. Prather, PhD — “The Sleep Prescription is a practical guide to improving your sleep and enhancing your life. Prather offers a set of transfor­mative and doable changes in sleep habits that can make you healthier, happier, and more productive.” —Tom Boyce, MD, author of The Orchid and the Dandelion

“Wind Trees” by John Freeman — “With this collection, Freeman compels us to feel, in turns of turbulence and stillness, the longing and rage and wonder that visit anyone keenly and tenderly paying attention to the passage of human life in an uncertain landscape and time. Freeman’s poems become all at once like eulogy, like instruction, like acts of love.” —Pitchaya Sudbanthad

PICTURE BOOK

“Berry Song” by Michaela Goade
“Keepunumuk: Weeachumun’s Thanksgiving Story” by Danielle Greendeer, Anthony Perry and Alexis Bunt
“Kimchi, Kimchi Every Day” by Erica Kim
“More than Peach” by Bellen Woodard

JUVENILE BIOGRAPHY

“Finding My Dance” by Ria Thundercloud — “A moving picture book about the resilience one can find in one’s cultural inheritance.” —Kirkus Reviews

“The Eagle Huntress: The True Story of the Girl who Soared Beyond Expectations” by Aisholpan Nurgaiv with Liz Welsh — “Nurgaiv’s love for and pride in her homeland, culture, and family come through with quiet, persuasive power. An intriguing memoir from a girl who’s become a cultural icon.”―Kirkus

“The Vast Wonder of the World” by Melina Mangal — “Ernest Everett Just was not like other scientists of his time. He saw the whole, where others saw only parts. He noticed details others failed to see. He persisted in his research despite the discrimination and limitations imposed on him as an African American. …” —ONIX Annotations

JUVENILE FICTION

“Hear Me” by Kerry O’Malley Cerra — “Asterisks replace unheard words of dialogue in this moving middle grade novel, based on the author’s own life, that follows an adolescent girl’s struggle with both progressive hearing loss and her parents’ insistence that she get cochlear implants.”―The New York Times Book Review

YOUNG ADULT FICTION

“A Girl’s Guide to Love & Magic” by Debbie Rigaud — “Rigaud explores many elements of Haitian and Afro-Caribbean culture thoughtfully and with an admirable vulnerability as Cicely adventures down Eastern Parkway navigating stigma and magic, devils and allies, family legacies and shame en route to a rich, magical sort of self-discovery. Steeped in the magic of first kisses, family bonds, and joyful community.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“How Moon Fuentez Fell in Love with the Universe”by Raquel Vasquez Gilliland — “Amazingly realistic, this book is the coming-of-age story that teens need, wrapped in a gorgeously poetic package” — Booklist starred review

“Lakelore” by Anna-Maria McLemore — “An astonishingly beautiful love letter to neurodivergent and nonbinary teens cast amid a magical lake setting that will pull you in right along with the characters.” ―Booklist, starred review

“List of Ten” by Halli Gomez — “Told in the first person, this powerful novel takes readers into the emotional and physical depths of TS, feeling every pain and twitch. . . .This #OwnVoices novel gives insight into living with these conditions, and readers will ponder how friendship means more than being “perfect.”—School Library Journal

“Love from A to Z” by S. K. Ali — “In Love from A to Z, S.K. Ali once again takes an unflinching and moving look at the intricacies of life as a Muslim teen in an imperfect, multi-cultural world. Beautiful.” ― Shelf Awareness, starred review

“Meet Me in Mumbai” by Sabina Kahn — “Thought-provoking . . . compassionate . . . hopeful.” – Publishers Weekly

“Patron Saints of Nothing” by Randy Ribay — “Passionately and fearlessly, Ribay delves into matters of justice, grief, and identity.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

“The Life and Crimes of Hoodie Rosen” by Isaac Blum — “A sharply written coming-of-age story whose protagonist, like any teen, is figuring out where he fits in, under circumstances that are thought-provoking and at times heart-wrenching.” –Horn Book Magazine, *STARRED REVIEW*

“The Words in my Hands” by Asphyxia — “Part coming of age, part call to action, this fast-paced #ownvoices novel about a Deaf teenager is a unique and inspiring exploration of what it means to belong.” — Amazon.com

“TJ Powar has Something to Prove” by Jesmeen Kaur Deo — “In [a] poignant debut…Deo delivers a refreshing take on the familiar self-love narrative, portraying characters across the Indian diaspora whose determination to be themselves, irrespective of Western cultural perspectives, drives home the idea that the perception of oneself through a singular lens is often incomplete.”–Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Where Angels Pass” by Ellen Gable — “Ellen Gable tells a very personal and difficult story, Where Angels Pass, with such gentleness, love, and heartfelt honesty. What I expected to be an uncomfortable story ended up being a love story of a daughter for her father, a father who suffered the lifelong effects of something no young person should ever experience. Thank you, Ellen, for sharing this deeply moving story that will surely touch readers in a very profound way.” — Jim Sano, author, The Father’s Son

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2022

ADULT FICTION

“Book of Extraordinary Tragedies” by Joe Meno — “[A] richly embroidered coming-of-age story . . . An uplifting and interesting exploration of one family’s struggle for existence in the United States, against the backdrop of history, classical and popular music, and the financial crisis of 2007–08; highly recommended.” —Library Journal, starred review

“Eversion” by Alastair Reynolds — “[An] utterly brilliant exploration of life, death, and consciousness … It’s his most ambitious, certainly, and at the very least, one of his best. Required reading for SF fans.”―Booklist

“Fairy Tale” by Stephen King — “A page-turner driven by memorably strange encounters and well-rendered, often thrilling action.”
The New York Times Book Review 

“Has Anyone Seen My Toes” by Christopher Buckley — “This is Buckley at his comic, mischievous best…Buckley delights in exploring the intersections of plausible and absurd as they arise in an off-kilter mind that resembles the author’s for all its allusive gymnastics and silliness.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Last of the Seven: A Novel of World War II” by Steven Hartov — “A fact-inspired novel about a German Jewish soldier fighting for the British as a member of two secret, all-Jewish commando units disguised as Nazis. … Hartov is at his best capturing the torturous physical tests his protagonist is put to. The desert scenes scorch the imagination; the bombing of a transport ship is horrific. … A little-known story enjoyably told.”—Kirkus Reviews

“Lucy by the Sea” by Elizabeth Strout — “No novelist working today has Strout’s extraordinary capacity for radical empathy, for seeing the essence of people beyond reductive categories, for uniting us without sentimentality. I didn’t just love Lucy by the Sea; I needed it. May droves of readers come to feel enlarged, comforted, and genuinely uplifted by Lucy’s story.”—The Boston Globe

“Lungfish” by Meghan Gillis — “A family lives illegally on a Maine island, barely surviving, while a father endures recovery; Gilliss imbues every page with the ache and uncertainty of trying to give a child small pockets of joy under near impossible circumstances. The story is told balletically, compulsively, in short spurts of image and sensation, while also managing to immerse the reader fully in the textures, tastes and sounds of the Maine coast.” —Lynn Steger Strong, Los Angeles Times

“Mad Honey” by Jodi Picoult — “Alternatingly heart-pounding and heartbreaking . . .This collaboration between two best-selling authors seamlessly weaves together Olivia and Lily’s journeys, creating a provocative exploration of the strength that love and acceptance require.”—The Washington Post

“Moth” by Melody Razak — “Gripping… Razak painstakingly paints a portrait of a family; their rituals, their private languages, their shared lives. This careful characterisation pays off, heartbreakingly, when the horrors of partition wreak havoc on small, happy lives” — The Times

“Our Missing Hearts” by Celeste Ng — “Utterly stupendous. Ng creates an exquisite story of unbreakable family bonds, lifesaving storytelling (and seemingly omniscient librarians!), brilliantly subversive art, and accidentally transformative activism. As lyrical as it is chilling, as astonishing as it is empathic, Our Missing Hearts arguably achieves literary perfection.” — Booklist (starred review)

“Shrines of Gaiety” by Kate Atkinson — “[A] riveting re-creation of life in 1920s London…Atkinson’s palpable fondness for her characters helps her to imbue even themost minor of them with texture and depth, and she brings the same attention to detail to her portrait of the highs and lows of Jazz Age London. Another triumph from one of our finest novelists.”
Booklist (starred review)

“The Marriage Portrait” by Maggie O’Farrell — “O’Farrell intelligently connects Lucrezia’s trapped circumstances with the art that her husband, a notable patron and collector, commissions to immortalize her . . . There is a blinding power to the heightened, almost fetishistic beauty of Renaissance art, this novel suggests as it portrays a world of far greater brutality and fierceness.” —Wall Street Journal

“The Winners” by Fredrik Backman — “Backman leaves no emotion unturned, sweeping up the reader in riveting family dramas that jump the boundaries of hockey-town rivalries. Another winner.” —Library Journal (starred review)

“Village Idiot” by Steve Stern — “In an act of resounding creative alchemy, audaciously imaginative Stern combines his fascination with Jewish folktales and mysticism with the life and work of painter Chaim Soutine, forging saturated, gleaming, and tumultuous prose that captures the vision and vehemence of Soutine’s thickly textured, writhing, nearly hallucinatory paintings….Stern’s kinetically inventive and insightful homage is incandescent, riveting, and revelatory in its wrestling with the mysteries of creativity and the scourge of antisemitism.” — Booklist, STARRED REVIEW

ADULT MYSTERY

“Girl, Forgotten” by Karin Slaughter — “Slaughter skillfully leads readers on a thrilling journey into the past to solve the murder that a small town wants to forget, yet is still haunted by.”  — Library Journal (starred review)

“`Long Shadows” by David Baldacci — “The plot gets complex, with suspects galore. But the interpersonal dynamic between Decker and White is just as interesting as the solution to the murders, which doesn’t come easily . . . The pair will make a great series duo, especially if a bit of that initial tension between them returns . . . Fascinating main characters and a clever plot add up to an exciting read.”―Kirkus Reviews

“Treasure State” by C. J. Box — “[A] fast-paced mystery that pits betrayal, anger, and hate against hope and longing as it examines the lasting effect of a community used and abandoned after making a fortune for the titans of the copper mining industry.” ―Library Journal

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“Acceptance: A Memoir” by Emi Nietfeld — “A luminous, generation-defining memoir of foster care and homelessness, Harvard and Big Tech, examining society’s fixation with resilience—and its cost” — Publisher Annotation

“Dinners with Ruth: A Memoir on the Power of Friendships” by Nina Totenberg — “A genial, likable tone. Totenberg’s stories are lively but never go on too long; she appears to reflexively turn the reader’s attention to the generosity or small kindnesses of others. She writes, without pretension or self-congratulation, about moments of journalistic triumph of which she has every right to be proud…Her final display of friendship in this book entails laying bare just how frail Ginsburg truly was — and how extraordinary she was to persevere and inspire for as long as she did.” – The New York Times Book Review 

“The Daughters of Auschwitz: My Story of Resilience and Hope” by Tova Friedman — “This is the real thing, the horrors of the Holocaust brought shudderingly to life, and all from the point of view of a small child who could barely read or recognize numbers… It is an angry book, but it is also required reading.”—The Jewish Chronicle

“The Man Who Could Move Clouds” by Ingrid Rojas Contreras — “Rojas Contreras reacquaints herself with her family’s past, weaving their stories with personal narrative, unraveling legacies of violence, machismo and colonialism…In the process, she has written a spellbinding and genre-defying ancestral history.”—New York Times Book Review

ADULT NON-FICTION

“Africa is not a Country” Notes on a Bright Continent” by Dipo Faloyin — “With clarity and incisive wit, journalist Faloyin explores the origins of the 54 countries of Africa…Africa Is Not a Country [is] a forceful rebuttal of erased histories and simplified imagery as well as a celebration of a continent already living its dynamic future.” ― Booklist (starred review)

“Boards and Spreads: Shareable, Simple Arrangements for Every Meal” by Yasmin Fahr — “Whether hosting a dinner party or a sleepover, readers will find fun recipes and eye-pleasing, and crowd-pleasing, solutions for all their entertaining needs.”—Library Journal

“Breathless: The Scientific Race to Defeat a Deadly Virus” by David Quammen — “An authoritative new history of Covid-19 and its predecessors. . . . [Quammen] constructs a masterful account of viral evolution culminating in Covid-19. . . . Unsettling global health news brilliantly delivered by an expert.” ― Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“Pickleball for All: Everything but the “Kitchen” Sink” by Rachel Simon — “An entertaining and comprehensive look at America’s fastest growing sport, Pickleball for All is the ultimate primer for any level of player interested in the wacky history, unique rules, and exciting future of pickleball. ” — Amazon.com

“The Chaos Machine: The Inside Story of How Social Media Rewired our Mines and our World” by Max Fisher — “A Pulitzer Prize finalist, New York Times investigative reporter Fisher debuts with a critique of social networks, traveling worldwide to show that their rage for maximum engagement has radically restructured the world and led to extreme thought and, more crucially, extreme action. Homing in on pandemic, election, and insurrection; ” — Barbara Hoffert. LJ Prepub Alert Online Review. LIBRARY JOURNAL, c2022.

“The Mosquito Bowl: A Game of Life and Death in World War II” by Buzz Bissinger — “Bissinger effortlessly combines sports and military history in this gritty account of a football game played by U.S. Marines on Guadalcanal in December 1944 . . . . The book excels in its sweeping yet fine-grained portraits of how these Marines got to Guadalcanal and in the harrowing descriptions of Pacific Theater combat, including the bloody fight for Sugar Loaf Hill on Okinawa. This is a penetrating tale of courage and sacrifice.” — Publishers Weekly

“The Need to be Whole: Patriotism and the History of Prejudice” by David Quammen — “America’s greatest philosopher on sustainable life and living.” ―Chicago Tribune

“The Storm is Here: An American Crucible” by Luke Mogelson — “Indispensable . . . The great New Yorker battlefield reporter immerses himself with American militias you’ve only heard about, providing a firsthand account of those countrymen who are increasingly turning on their government. It reads like a first draft of the breakdown of American democracy.” —Chicago Tribune

PICTURE BOOK

“Opening Day Trouble: At the Great Vermont Corn Maze” by Mike Boudrea

EASY READER

“Wild Fliers!” by Martin and Chris Kraft

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Turner Family Stories: From Enslavement in Vermont” edited by Jane C. Beck & Andy Kolovos — “Turner Family Stories: From Enslavement in Virginia to Freedom in Vermont features the work of six New England cartoonists drawing on the rich personal and family stories of the remarkable Daisy Turner (1883-1988) of Grafton, Vermont.” — Amazon.com

JUVENILE NON-FICTION

“Your Yard is Nature: 10 Ways to Help Birds and Pollinators in Your Yard” by Leslie Nelson Inman

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

“Turner Family Stories: From Enslavement in Vermont” edited by Jane C. Beck & Andy Kolovos — “Turner Family Stories: From Enslavement in Virginia to Freedom in Vermont features the work of six New England cartoonists drawing on the rich personal and family stories of the remarkable Daisy Turner (1883-1988) of Grafton, Vermont.” — Amazon.com

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – AUGUST 2022

ADULT FICTION

“Chrysalis: A Thriller” by Lincoln Child – “…It’s what happens along the way that makes the [book] so enjoyable: the false leads, blind alleys, and bad assumptions; the slow accumulation of facts that points to a solution that cannot possibly be true—except that it must be. An intriguing, suspenseful, and very satisfying thriller.”—Booklist

“Flying Solo” by Linda Holmes — “A refreshing reminder that there’s no one-size-fits-all mold for a relationship, and that fulfillment can be achieved many ways.”—The Washington Post

“Nightcrawling” by Leila Mottley — “A work of devastating social realism . . . executed with relentless momentum . . . A powerful discourse on the dehumanizing effects policing can have on marginalized communities, bodies, and minds (and especially on Black women).” —Library Journal(starred)

“One Two Three: A Novel” by Laurie Frankel — “One Two Three is a compelling story about environmental injustice and the people caring for each other in a small community. Reading Laurie Frankel’s books change how we look at each other and the world.”―BookTrib

“Point Last Seen” by Christina Dodd — “When it comes to nerve-shredding, edge-of-your-seat suspense, Dodd consistently delivers the goods…Point Last Seen is a gobsmackingly great read.”—Booklist STARRED REVIEW

“The 6:30 Man” by David Baldacci — “After a cryptic murder, a former soldier-turned-entry-level analyst, who boards the 6:20 commuter train like clockwork, is forced into a clandestine investigation into his firm that takes him to the darkest corners of the country’s economic halls of power, rife with corruption, where a killer awaits.” — Atlas Publishing

“The It Girl” by Ruth Ware — “This exceptional psychological thriller from Ware probes how much one can trust others—and one’s self . . . . Alternating past and present chapters build toward a gripping denouement as nicely chosen details bring each character vividly to life. This showcases Ware’s gifts to the fullest.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“The Measure: A Novel” by Nikki Erlick — “A compelling, heart-breaking story of life and love with a perfect, elegant premise.” — Bridget Collins, bestselling author of The Binding

ADULT MYSTERY

“Escape” by James Patterson – “#1 New York Times bestselling detective Billy Harney of The Black Book is chasing down a billionaire crime boss and a prison escape artist while a young girl’s life hangs in the balance.” — Grand Central Publishing

“Local Gone Missing” by Fiona Barton – “A cleverly crafted puzzle that has emotional heft and social commentary as well as an intriguing web of mysteries.” — St. Louis Post-Dispatch

“Outside” by Ragnar Jonasson – “[An] excruciatingly slow-motion avalanche in which it’s obvious from the beginning that “something’s got to die before we finish this trip”; the only questions are who, how many, under what circumstances, and at whose hands….A shivery delight.” ―Kirkus Reviews

“The Drowning Sea” by Sarah Stewart — “Atmospheric… Taylor creates a rich and gothic atmosphere, with the ocean beating against the treacherous, wind-swept cliffs… The Drowning Sea’s gorgeous backdrop and stalwart sleuth will satisfy and impress mystery readers, particularly fans of traditional whodunits.” ―BookPage

ADULT NON-FICTION

Two Wheels Good: The History and Mystery of the Bicycle” by Jody Rosen — “A lively biography of a tool central to the greening of urban spaces. It’s also a fascinating, sweeping everyday explainer, moving from the bike’s 19th-century origins to its importance globally.”—Chicago Tribune

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Bridges: Engineering Masterpieces” by Dan Zettwooch — “Bea, Archie, Trudy and Spence, aka the BATS, travel around the world using every type of bridge imaginable, identifying the dangerous forces trying to bring these structures crashing down and how to defeat them through engineering.” — Atlas Publishing

Categories
Current Exhibit

Betty (BJ) Gray

Last winter I decided to try something I have difficulty with – portraits. 

Working with loud music to distract me and using watercolor quickly, I wanted to capture interesting people of Greensboro.

I studied at Allegheny College and New York University.  Inspiration comes from the subjects I paint.  Over the door boards, which are paintings on wood, are what I do most.

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – JULY 2022

ADULT FICTION

“Hostage” by Clare Mackintosh — “Fiendishly clever. Mackintosh takes domestic suspense to new heights in this tale of a kidnapped child, hijacked plane, and two parents’ desperate fight to save their family.” ― Lisa Gardner, #1 New York Times bestselling author

“Life Sentences” by Billy O’Callaghan — “Billy O’Callaghan uses a trio of voices in his poignant novel Life Sentences as three generations of an Irish family probe a legacy of poverty and war. ….powerful.”
New York Times

“Montauk” by Nicola Harrison — “Glittering galas, lavish living, and the spoils of hedonism crash against the lush, wild, primitive beauty of an Atlantic Coastal fishing village, creating a perfect storm. Caught between the two worlds, one woman must discover who she truly is, even if it means losing everything in the process. Montauk is a stunning debut by a gifted storyteller.” – Erika Robuck, national bestselling author of Hemingway’s Girl

“The Bookshop of Second Chances” by Jackie Fraser — “Humor and charm abound. . . . [This] love story hits the spot.”—Publishers Weekly

“The Lamplighters” by Emma Stonex — “Superbly accomplished…The Lamplighters is a whodunnit, horror novel, ghost story and fantastically gripping psychological investigation rolled into one. It is also a pitch-perfect piece of writing.” —The Guardian (London)

“The Survivors” by Jane Harper — “As always, Harper skillfully evokes the landscape as she weaves a complicated, elegant web, full of long-buried secrets ready to come to light.” ―New York Times Book Review

ADULT MYSTERY

“Hatchet Island” by Paul Doiron — “Doiron paints a complex portrait of coastal Maine…Fans of C.J. Box’s Joe Pickett mysteries, which also star an indomitable game warden, will particularly enjoy this gripping tale.” —Bookpage

“The Bitterroots” by C. J. Box — “An appealing new heroine, a fast-moving plot, and a memorably nightmarish family make this one of Box’s ” ― Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

ADULT NON-FICTION

“Nala’s World: One Man, His Rescue Cat, and a Bike Ride around the Globe” by Dean Nicholson — “There are moments of tension, like when Nala can’t be found for a whole morning, and profundity . . . The writing is more like people you just met at a hostel telling you about their travels after a few pints. . . Nicholson is at his best when he tells the story of a man finding a sense of purpose from an unlikely (and adorable) source…charming.” ―New York Times Book Review

“Watching Darkness Fall: FDR, His Ambassadors, and the Rise of Adolf Hitler” by David McKean — “In new book Watching Darkness Fall, former US ambassador David McKean illustrates how antisemitism, apathy, and internal politics set America back in the war against Germany.” ―Times of Israel

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“A Life in Light: Meditations on Impermanence” by Mary Pipher — “For psychologist Pipher, the light found in nature, caring relationships, work, and books has always been the key to happiness. In this beautifully written memoir, her memories of childhood in Nebraska are vivid and poignant. . . . This lovely book teaches gentle lessons on gratitude and celebrating life.” ―Booklist, starred review

“Watching Darkness Fall: FDR, His Ambassadors, and the Rise of Adolf Hitler” by David McKean — “In new book Watching Darkness Fall, former US ambassador David McKean illustrates how antisemitism, apathy, and internal politics set America back in the war against Germany.” ―Times of Israel

PICTURE BOOK

“Better Than New: A Recycle Tale” by Robert Broder

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

Lore Olympus: Volume 2″ by Rachel Smythe — “Sensitive and elegant . . . Beautiful artwork and compelling characters [take] the forefront of this romantic, tech-savvy retelling of Greek mythology.”—Booklist

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – JUNE 2022

ADULT FICTION

” Bad Actors” by Mick Herron — “An outstanding mix of arch humor, superb characterizations, and trenchant political observations.”
Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

“Book Lovers” by Emily Henry — “[Book Lovers] is multilayered and the characters’ familial challenges are complex. By both playing to and overtly subverting romance tropes and archetypes like the high-powered big city woman who neglects her family and the life-affirming power of small-town life, this novel delivers an insightful comedic meditation on love, family and going your own way.”—NPR

“Five Tuesdays in Winter” by Lily King — “Lily King isn’t afraid of big emotional subjects: desire and grief, longing and love, growth and self-acceptance. But she eschews high drama for the immersive quiet of the everyday… Here we inhabit the worlds of authors and mothers, children and friends; we experience their lives in clear, graceful prose that swells with generous possibility. This is a book for writers and lovers, a book about storytelling itself, a book for all of us.”—Washington Post

“Girl in Ice” by Erica Ferencik — “Girl in Ice is a lot of things: a psychological suspense novel, a linguistic thriller and a scientific puzzle . . . Ferencik describes the Arctic topography with a poet’s awe, and some of her set-pieces—the procession of a huge herd of caribou, an Arctic dive gone badly awry—are breathtaking… A singular sensation.” —Wall Street Journal

“Harsh Times” by Mario Vargas Llosa — “[A] vivid story centered on the U.S.-backed 1954 coup in Guatemala . . . History here gets a compelling human face through an artist’s dramatic brilliance.” ―Kirkus Reviews (Starred Review)

“Honor” by Thrity Umrigar — “Umrigar excels in her juxtaposition of the contrasts between the tech hub image of contemporary India and the deep religious divisions that continue to wrack rural regions . . . This is a thought-provoking portrait of an India that ‘felt inexpressibly large—as well as small and provincial enough to choke.’” —Booklist

“Horse” by Geraldine Brooks — “With exceptional characterizations, Pulitzer Prize–winner Brooks tells an emotionally impactful tale . . . [The] settings are pitch-perfect, and the story brings to life the important roles filled by Black horsemen in America’s past. Brooks also showcases the magnificent beauty and competitive spirit of Lexington himself.” — Booklist (starred review)

“Lessons in Chemistry” by Bonnie Garmus — “In Garmus’s debut novel, a frustrated chemist finds herself at the helm of a cooking show that sparks a revolution. Welcome to the 1960s, where a woman’s arsenal of tools was often limited to the kitchen—and where Elizabeth Zott is hellbent on overturning the status quo one meal at a time.” —New York Times

“Minus Me” by Mameve Medwed — “Medwed’s lovely novel of marriage, motherhood, love and loss is so…A timely reminder that in the worst of times, we sometimes rediscover the very best of ourselves.”
Jodi Picoult, New York Times bestselling author of A Spark of Light

“Remarkably Bright Creatures” by Shelby Van Pelt — “Remarkably Bright Creatures [is] an ultimately feel-good but deceptively sensitive debut about what it feels like to have love taken from you, only to find it again in the most unexpected places. . . . Memorable and tender.” — Washington Post 

“Sea of Tranquility” by Emily St. John Mandel — “A time-travel puzzle… Mandel’s prose is beautiful but unfussy; some chapters are compressed into a few poetic lines. The story moves quickly… In the end, the novel’s interlocking plot resolves beautifully, making for a humane and moving time-travel story, as well as a meditation on loneliness and love.” —BookPage, starred

“Seven Steeples” by Sara Baume — “Seven Steeples is one of the most beautiful novels I have ever read….Baume’s descriptions of landscape are lovelier than I can express; you simply have to read them yourself.” — New York Times Book Review

“Sparring Partners” by John Grisham — “Jake Brigance is called upon to help his old friend, disgraced former attorney Mack Stafford, make his return; young death row inmate Cody Wallace has one final request just several hours before execution; two young attorney brothers, Kirk and Rusty Malloy, look to Diantha Bradshaw to help save their once prosperous firm which they inherited from their father.” — Baker & Taylor

“Suspects” by Danielle Steel — “Theodora Morgan, fashion royalty and one of the most successful businesswomen in the world, forms an instant connection with a man who, unbeknownst to her, is a CIA agent sent to protect her from the very same people involved in the kidnapping of her husband and son, which ended in tragedy.” — Baker & Taylor

“Take My Hand” by Dolen Perkins-Valdez — “Perhaps the most notable of this book’s gifts are its deft packaging of history and its quiet nod—in the juxtaposition of timelines—to the reproductive oppression haunting Black women to this day. Like the most effective education, though, it feels that the information is streaming through the heart, awakening it and inspiring it to action.”—San Francisco Chronicle

“The Forgotten Life of Eva Gordon” by Linda MacKillop –“[A] touching debut. . . . MacKillop takes the pain of aging and regret and infuses it with soul and a touch of humor. This auspicious first outing tugs at the heartstrings.” ― Publishers Weekly

“The Island” by Adrian McKinty — “One of this summer’s best standalone thrillers.” ―The Boston Globe

“The Lioness” by Chris Bohjalian — “[A] devastatingly cunning suspense novel… Bohjalian does a superb job of judiciously rolling out information of how past transgressions may have led to the heart-stopping episodes of chaos and carnage as the shocking, twist-filled plot builds up to the revelation of ‘the real reasons for the safari nightmare.’ This brilliant whydunit is not to be missed.” —Publishers Weekly, starred 

“The Lunar Housewife” by Caroline Woods — “An elegant novel of political and cultural suspense. . . the Cold War intrigue it conjures is gripping, and Louise’s dilemmas and adventures will hold sympathetic readers in thrall.”
–The Wall Street Journal

“The Murder of Mr. Wickham” by Claudia Gray — “Had Jane Austen sat down to write a country house murder mystery, this is exactly the book she would have written. Devotees of Austen’s timeless novels will get the greatest possible pleasure from this wonderful book. Immense fun and beautifully observed. Delicious!” —Alexander McCall Smith

“The Paris Apartment” by Lucy Foley — “But it’s not only the intelligent and riveting storyline or the carefully conceived and fully developed characters that elevates this book far above mundane thrillers. Foley’s precise prose rings with echoes of her British background and the elegance of her French setting. … With confidence and cunning, Foley provides pleasures that chill as they captivate.” — Fredericksburg Free Lance-Star

“The Paris Bookseller” by Karri Maher — “Kerri Maher’s The Paris Bookseller is a worthy homage to Sylvia Beach and a love letter to all bookstores, libraries, and the passionate and committed women who run them.” —New York Journal of Books

“The Sweetness of Water” by Nathan Harris — “Deeply moving… Harris’s ambitious debut explores the aftermath of the Emancipation Proclamation in rural Georgia… Harris peoples the small community with well-developed characters… [He] writes in intelligent, down-to-earth prose and shows a keen understanding of his characters.”―Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“The Twilight World” by Werner Herzog — “From the true story of a WWII soldier who kept up the fight until 1974, legendary filmmaker Herzog distills a brooding, poetic novella . . . Herzog, ever in pursuit of deeper truths, sees in Onoda’s predicament an all-too-ordinary tendency to subordinate facts to master narratives. —Booklist

“The Viscount Who Loved Me” by Julia Quinn — “Quinn is . . . a romance master. [She] has created a family so likable and attractive, a community so vibrant and engaging, that we want to crawl into the pages and know them.”  — NPR Books

ADULT MYSTERY

“Dream Town” by David Baldacci — “Baldacci paints a vivid picture of the not-so-distant era . . . The 1950s weren’t the fabled good old days, but they’re fodder for gritty crime stories of high ideals and lowlifes, of longing and disappointment, and all the trouble a PI can handle. Well-done crime fiction. Baldacci nails the noir.”―Kirkus, Starred Review

“The Investigator” by John Sandford — “The Investigator is a procedural action thriller in which the technical sleuthing only heightens the tension. Letty is such a capable character, and Mr. Sandford such a fine tactician, it would seem incomprehensible and even cruel to deny readers a swift follow-up.”–Wall Street Journal 

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“Pathological: The True Story of Six Misdiagnoses” by Sarah Fay — “A] fiery manifesto of a memoir.” — New York Times Book Review

“His Name is George Floyd: One Man’s Life and the Struggle for Racial Justice” by Robert Samuels — “Writing with cogency and compassion, the authors free Floyd from the realm of iconography, restoring his humanity . . . A brilliant biography, history book, and searing indictment of this country’s ongoing failure to eradicate systemic racism.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review 

“Lost & Found: A Memoir” by Kathryn Schulz — “Deeply felt. More than a reflection on the loss of a parent. It is about the idea of loss in general and the passage of time. Fresh and evocative . . . a poignant, loving, wise, and comforting meditation on grief from both a personal and collective perspective.” —Booklist (starred review)

ADULT NON-FICTION

“Against All Odds: A True Story of Ultimate Courage and Survival in World War II” by Alex Kershaw — “Against All Odds achieves a pitch-perfect balance between a ground view of combat and the seismic forces that drew men like [Maurice] Britt and [Audie] Murphy to the killing grounds of Europe. Its prose is sharp, efficient and entertaining, its characters thoroughly human.”—The Wall Street Journal

“Atlas of the Heart: Mapping Meaningful Connections & the Language of Human Experience” by Brene Brown — “…Brown takes us on a journey through eighty-seven of the emotions and experiences that define what it means to be human. As she maps the necessary skills and an actionable framework for meaningful connection, she gives us the language and tools to access a universe of new choices and second chances—a universe where we can share and steward the stories of our bravest and most heartbreaking moments with one another in a way that builds connection.” — Random House, Inc.

“Embrace Fearlessly: The Burning World: Essays” by Barry Holstun Lopez — “Altogether, the pieces are honest and searching, engaging readers in the largest of questions: How do we live in the world? How do we see it? How do we protect it? . . . A sterling valediction. Lopez’s many followers will treasure this book.”—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“How the World Really Works: The Science Behind How We Got Here and Where We’re Going” by Vaclav Smil — “You can agree or disagree with Smil—accept or doubt his ‘just the facts’ posture—but you probably shouldn’t ignore him. . . In Smil’s provocative but perceptive view, unrealistic notions about carbon reduction are partly, and ironically, attributable to the very productivity that societies achieved by substituting machine work, powered by fossil fuels, for draft animals and human laborers.”—The Washington Post

“How to Tell a Story: The Essential Guide to Memorable Storytelling From the Moth” by Meg Bowles — “Inspiring . . . This book . . . provides everything readers need to share their own personal narratives.”—Booklist

“Lakes: Their Birth, Life, and Death” by John Richard Saylor — “Saylor delivers science in a layperson’s language to detail their forms, how they’re created, how they’re miraculously sustained, and, yes, how they die. Revelations abound.”—Booklist

“Last Call at the Hotel Imperial: The Reporters Who Took on a World at War” by Deborah Cohen — “In her engrossing account of this era and the people who did more than simply report facts, Cohen successfully interweaves international events with personal histories, creating a narrative that is well-crafted and comprehensively researched. . . . The resulting history is both unique and memorable. —Library Journal (starred review)

“Makhno: Ukrainian Freedom Fighter” by Philippe Thirault — “In early 20th century Ukraine, anarchist Nestor Makhno, the son of peasants, was among the most heroic and colorful figures of the Russian Revolution, encouraging his people to find and embrace social and economic self-determination. This is his story, of a military strategist who tirelessly defied both the Bolsheviks and the Germans to protect his homeland.” — Amazon.com

“On Task: How Our Brains Get Things Done” by David Badre –“On Task is a stimulating, enjoyable read for anyone interested in brain function, particularly if you want to understand how researchers are attempting to unravel some of the biggest mysteries of them all: how humans think, how they are successful when confronted with new challenges and how prefrontal cortex might contribute to that success.”—Masud Husain, Brain

“River of the Gods” by Candace Millard — “Millard’s research and very readable storytelling are admirable. . . Ultimately, the identity of the person who first discovered the source of the White Nile may be a trivial matter. Ms. Millard conscientiously investigates the issue, of course, but River of the Gods is compelling because she does justice to the psyches and behavior of Burton and Speke—keenly flawed but enthralling, sometimes marvelous people.” — Wall Street Journal

“Sidelined: How Women Manage & Mismanage Their Health” by Susan Salenger — “A well-written and empowering work about the challenges facing female patients.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Somewhere We are Human: Authentic Voices on Migration, Survival and New Beginnings” edited by Reyna Grande and Sonia Guinansaca — “Wide-ranging yet consistently affecting, these pieces offer a crucial and inspired survey of the immigrant experience in America.” — Publishers Weekly

“The Complete Guide to Food Allergies in Adults and Children” by Scott H. Sicherer — “An outstanding, comprehensive, easily understandable, and up-to-date resource for people with food allergies, as well as their parents and caregivers.” — Anna Nowak-Wegrzyn, MD, PhD, New York University Grossman School of Medicine

“The Flag, the Cross, and the Station Wagon: A Graying American Looks Back at his Suburban Boyhood and Wonders What the Hell Happened” by Bill McKibben — “Adept at factual storytelling and connecting the dots, earnest, caring, and funny, McKibben dovetails personal reckonings with an astute elucidation of our social justice and environmental crises, arguing wisely that facing the truth about our past is the only way forward to a more just and sustainable future.” ―Booklist, starred review

“The Greatest Polar Expedition of All Time: The Arctic Mission to the Epicenter of Climate Change” by Markus Rex — “This marvelous book brings us aboard a unique 21st-century Arctic expedition—science-driven, multi-national, unprecedented—as it sails into the epicenter of the worsening climate crisis. For anyone concerned about global warming—and that should be all of us —this book is essential reading. A contemporary classic!”
Ken McGoogan, author of Fatal Passage: The Story of John Rae, The Arctic Hero Time Forgot and Dead Reckoning: The Untold Story of the Northwest Passage

“The Insect Crisis: The Fall of the Tiny Empires That Run the World” by Oliver Milman — “In this well-researched, engagingly written, and refreshingly measured book, Oliver Milman reveals the profound and complex implications of insect decline. A necessary and timely wake-up call full of fascinating and often unexpected detail.” ― Hugh Raffles, author of Insectopedia

“The Last Days of the Dinosaurs: An Asteroid, Extinction, and the Beginning of the World” by Riley Black — “A real-life, natural history page-turning drama that is necessary reading for almost anyone interested in the history of life.” ―Library Journal, starred review

“The Savory Baker: 150 Creative Recipes, From Classic to Modern” by America’s Test Kitchen — “Baking is about a lot more than just desserts. This unique collection, one of the few to focus solely on the savory side of baking, explores a multitude of flavor possibilities. Get inspired by creative twists like gochujang-filled puff pastry pinwheels or feta-studded dill-zucchini bread. And sample traditional baked goods from around the world, from Chinese lop cheung bao to Brazilian pão de quejo.” — Annotation

“The Woodchuck Travels through the Garden Seasons” by Ron Krupp — “This seasoned Vermont gardener ….groups topics and plants through the seasons, interspersed with his brand of humor and art and quotes he has found relevant and inspiring. If you’re a gardener in the Green Mountain State, or similar climate, you’re bound to pick up some tips or different views on diverse topics from composting to climate change, from pesticides to poetry to publications to pollinators.” — Dr. Leonard Payne Perry – Horticulture Professor Emeritus, University of Vermont

“Unmasking Autism: Discovering the New Faces of Neurodiversity” by Devon Price — “Price’s accessible and compassionate writing shines, and readers will feel encouraged to embrace a new understanding of themselves. Its potential to help masked autistic adults, especially those from systemically marginalized backgrounds, makes this book essential for most collections.”—Library Journal (starred review)

“Vermont Heritage: Essays on the Green Mountain History, 1770-1920” by H. Nicholas Muller III and J. Kevin Graffagnino — “It includes essays on Vermont historiography, Ethan and Ira Allen, early Vermont printing, eighteenth-century Vermont politics, the War of 1812, Vermont’s reaction to the 1837–38 Patriote Rebellion, and aspects of Victorian Vermont. The authors offer reminiscences and reflections on their lengthy Vermont careers in a joint Introduction.” — Vermont Research Books

“Write for Your Life” by Anne Quindlen — The #1 New York Times best-selling novelist and author of A Short Guide to a Happy Life, using examples past, present and future, shows how writing connects us, to ourselves and those we cherish—and issues a clarion call to pick up the pen, and find yourself.” — Atlas Publishing

“You Don’t Know Us Negroes: And Other Essays” by Zora Neale Hurston — “This volume enables readers both steeped in and new to Hurston to discover her acerbic wit, her crisp prose, and the breadth of her artistic ability and interests …. an invaluable nonfiction companion to the collection of Hurston’s short stories.” — Booklist

PARENTING

“How to Raise an Antiracist” by Ibram X. Kendi — “A readable and approachable guide . . . Because of its scope, nearly all readers will come away from Kendi’s message more aware and having found a point of resonance in their own lives. Best-selling Kendi is an antiracism trailblazer and parents, educators, and everyone else who cares for children will seek his guidance.”—Booklist (starred review)

PICTURE BOOK

“You’re in Good Paws” by Maureen Fergus

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Whales: Diving Into the Unknown” by Casey Zakroff — “Zip, an enthusiastic beaked whale, is eager to share everything he can about whale pods by broadcasting his very own undersea podcast! He will travel across the global ocean interviewing a diverse assortment of whales and dolphins about their amazing behaviors and habitats, as well as their interactions with the human world. Can this one small whale tell the story of the whole ocean and the interconnectivity that affects us all?” — Baker & Taylor

YA FICTION

“We Contain Multitudes” by Sarah Henstra — “This is an absolutely extraordinary work of fiction that proves the epistolary novel is an art form. Kurl and Jo are characters to die for, emotionally compelling and empathetic. Their quotidian lives are riveting and their story unforgettable…not to be missed.”―Booklist, starred review

Categories
Highlighted New Arrivals

All Boys Aren’t Blue by George M. Johnson

“The conversational tone will leave readers feeling like they are sitting with an insightful friend . . . This young adult memoir is a contemporary hallmark of the blossoming genre. Johnson anchors the text with encouragement and realistic guidance for queer Black youth.” ―School Library Journal

Categories
Highlighted New Arrivals

West with the Giraffes by Linda Rutledge

“[A] larger-than-life story about the power of both animal magnetism and human connection…witty, charming, and heartwarming.” ―Booklist

Categories
Highlighted New Arrivals

Trooper: The Heartwarming Story of the Bobcat Who Became Part of My Family by Forrest Bryant Johnson

“Whenever middle-aged desert tour guide Forrest Bryant Johnson went out on his daily walks into the Mojave, all was usually peaceful and serene. But one beautiful summer day in 1987, Forrest heard a cry of distress. Following the cries, he came upon a small bobcat kitten, injured, orphaned, and desperately in need of help. So Forrest took his new feline friend home for a night. But when the little “trooper” clearly needed some more time to recoup, that night turned into two nights, a week, and eventually nineteen years. And so Trooper became a part of the Johnson family.” — Baker & Taylor