Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – JUNE 2022

ADULT FICTION

” Bad Actors” by Mick Herron — “An outstanding mix of arch humor, superb characterizations, and trenchant political observations.”
Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

“Book Lovers” by Emily Henry — “[Book Lovers] is multilayered and the characters’ familial challenges are complex. By both playing to and overtly subverting romance tropes and archetypes like the high-powered big city woman who neglects her family and the life-affirming power of small-town life, this novel delivers an insightful comedic meditation on love, family and going your own way.”—NPR

“Five Tuesdays in Winter” by Lily King — “Lily King isn’t afraid of big emotional subjects: desire and grief, longing and love, growth and self-acceptance. But she eschews high drama for the immersive quiet of the everyday… Here we inhabit the worlds of authors and mothers, children and friends; we experience their lives in clear, graceful prose that swells with generous possibility. This is a book for writers and lovers, a book about storytelling itself, a book for all of us.”—Washington Post

“Harsh Times” by Mario Vargas Llosa — “[A] vivid story centered on the U.S.-backed 1954 coup in Guatemala . . . History here gets a compelling human face through an artist’s dramatic brilliance.” ―Kirkus Reviews (Starred Review)

“Honor” by Thrity Umrigar — “Umrigar excels in her juxtaposition of the contrasts between the tech hub image of contemporary India and the deep religious divisions that continue to wrack rural regions . . . This is a thought-provoking portrait of an India that ‘felt inexpressibly large—as well as small and provincial enough to choke.’” —Booklist

“Horse” by Geraldine Brooks — “With exceptional characterizations, Pulitzer Prize–winner Brooks tells an emotionally impactful tale . . . [The] settings are pitch-perfect, and the story brings to life the important roles filled by Black horsemen in America’s past. Brooks also showcases the magnificent beauty and competitive spirit of Lexington himself.” — Booklist (starred review)

“Lessons in Chemistry” by Bonnie Garmus — “In Garmus’s debut novel, a frustrated chemist finds herself at the helm of a cooking show that sparks a revolution. Welcome to the 1960s, where a woman’s arsenal of tools was often limited to the kitchen—and where Elizabeth Zott is hellbent on overturning the status quo one meal at a time.” —New York Times

“Minus Me” by Mameve Medwed — “Medwed’s lovely novel of marriage, motherhood, love and loss is so…A timely reminder that in the worst of times, we sometimes rediscover the very best of ourselves.”
Jodi Picoult, New York Times bestselling author of A Spark of Light

“Remarkably Bright Creatures” by Shelby Van Pelt — “Remarkably Bright Creatures [is] an ultimately feel-good but deceptively sensitive debut about what it feels like to have love taken from you, only to find it again in the most unexpected places. . . . Memorable and tender.” — Washington Post 

“Sea of Tranquility” by Emily St. John Mandel — “A time-travel puzzle… Mandel’s prose is beautiful but unfussy; some chapters are compressed into a few poetic lines. The story moves quickly… In the end, the novel’s interlocking plot resolves beautifully, making for a humane and moving time-travel story, as well as a meditation on loneliness and love.” —BookPage, starred

“Seven Steeples” by Sara Baume — “Seven Steeples is one of the most beautiful novels I have ever read….Baume’s descriptions of landscape are lovelier than I can express; you simply have to read them yourself.” — New York Times Book Review

“Sparring Partners” by John Grisham — “Jake Brigance is called upon to help his old friend, disgraced former attorney Mack Stafford, make his return; young death row inmate Cody Wallace has one final request just several hours before execution; two young attorney brothers, Kirk and Rusty Malloy, look to Diantha Bradshaw to help save their once prosperous firm which they inherited from their father.” — Baker & Taylor

“Suspects” by Danielle Steel — “Theodora Morgan, fashion royalty and one of the most successful businesswomen in the world, forms an instant connection with a man who, unbeknownst to her, is a CIA agent sent to protect her from the very same people involved in the kidnapping of her husband and son, which ended in tragedy.” — Baker & Taylor

“Take My Hand” by Dolen Perkins-Valdez — “Perhaps the most notable of this book’s gifts are its deft packaging of history and its quiet nod—in the juxtaposition of timelines—to the reproductive oppression haunting Black women to this day. Like the most effective education, though, it feels that the information is streaming through the heart, awakening it and inspiring it to action.”—San Francisco Chronicle

“The Forgotten Life of Eva Gordon” by Linda MacKillop –“[A] touching debut. . . . MacKillop takes the pain of aging and regret and infuses it with soul and a touch of humor. This auspicious first outing tugs at the heartstrings.” ― Publishers Weekly

“The Island” by Adrian McKinty — “One of this summer’s best standalone thrillers.” ―The Boston Globe

“The Lioness” by Chris Bohjalian — “[A] devastatingly cunning suspense novel… Bohjalian does a superb job of judiciously rolling out information of how past transgressions may have led to the heart-stopping episodes of chaos and carnage as the shocking, twist-filled plot builds up to the revelation of ‘the real reasons for the safari nightmare.’ This brilliant whydunit is not to be missed.” —Publishers Weekly, starred 

“The Lunar Housewife” by Caroline Woods — “An elegant novel of political and cultural suspense. . . the Cold War intrigue it conjures is gripping, and Louise’s dilemmas and adventures will hold sympathetic readers in thrall.”
–The Wall Street Journal

“The Murder of Mr. Wickham” by Claudia Gray — “Had Jane Austen sat down to write a country house murder mystery, this is exactly the book she would have written. Devotees of Austen’s timeless novels will get the greatest possible pleasure from this wonderful book. Immense fun and beautifully observed. Delicious!” —Alexander McCall Smith

“The Paris Bookseller” by Karri Maher — “Kerri Maher’s The Paris Bookseller is a worthy homage to Sylvia Beach and a love letter to all bookstores, libraries, and the passionate and committed women who run them.” —New York Journal of Books

“The Sweetness of Water” by Nathan Harris — “Deeply moving… Harris’s ambitious debut explores the aftermath of the Emancipation Proclamation in rural Georgia… Harris peoples the small community with well-developed characters… [He] writes in intelligent, down-to-earth prose and shows a keen understanding of his characters.”―Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“The Twilight World” by Werner Herzog — “From the true story of a WWII soldier who kept up the fight until 1974, legendary filmmaker Herzog distills a brooding, poetic novella . . . Herzog, ever in pursuit of deeper truths, sees in Onoda’s predicament an all-too-ordinary tendency to subordinate facts to master narratives. —Booklist

“The Viscount Who Loved Me” by Julia Quinn — “Quinn is . . . a romance master. [She] has created a family so likable and attractive, a community so vibrant and engaging, that we want to crawl into the pages and know them.”  — NPR Books

ADULT MYSTERY

“Dream Town” by David Baldacci — “Baldacci paints a vivid picture of the not-so-distant era . . . The 1950s weren’t the fabled good old days, but they’re fodder for gritty crime stories of high ideals and lowlifes, of longing and disappointment, and all the trouble a PI can handle. Well-done crime fiction. Baldacci nails the noir.”―Kirkus, Starred Review

“The Investigator” by John Sandford — “The Investigator is a procedural action thriller in which the technical sleuthing only heightens the tension. Letty is such a capable character, and Mr. Sandford such a fine tactician, it would seem incomprehensible and even cruel to deny readers a swift follow-up.”–Wall Street Journal 

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“Pathological: The True Story of Six Misdiagnoses” by Sarah Fay — “A] fiery manifesto of a memoir.” — New York Times Book Review

“His Name is George Floyd: One Man’s Life and the Struggle for Racial Justice” by Robert Samuels — “Writing with cogency and compassion, the authors free Floyd from the realm of iconography, restoring his humanity . . . A brilliant biography, history book, and searing indictment of this country’s ongoing failure to eradicate systemic racism.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review 

“Lost & Found: A Memoir” by Kathryn Schulz — “Deeply felt. More than a reflection on the loss of a parent. It is about the idea of loss in general and the passage of time. Fresh and evocative . . . a poignant, loving, wise, and comforting meditation on grief from both a personal and collective perspective.” —Booklist (starred review)

ADULT NON-FICTION

“Against All Odds: A True Story of Ultimate Courage and Survival in World War II” by Alex Kershaw — “Against All Odds achieves a pitch-perfect balance between a ground view of combat and the seismic forces that drew men like [Maurice] Britt and [Audie] Murphy to the killing grounds of Europe. Its prose is sharp, efficient and entertaining, its characters thoroughly human.”—The Wall Street Journal

“Atlas of the Heart: Mapping Meaningful Connections & the Language of Human Experience” by Brene Brown — “…Brown takes us on a journey through eighty-seven of the emotions and experiences that define what it means to be human. As she maps the necessary skills and an actionable framework for meaningful connection, she gives us the language and tools to access a universe of new choices and second chances—a universe where we can share and steward the stories of our bravest and most heartbreaking moments with one another in a way that builds connection.” — Random House, Inc.

“Embrace Fearlessly: The Burning World: Essays” by Barry Holstun Lopez — “Altogether, the pieces are honest and searching, engaging readers in the largest of questions: How do we live in the world? How do we see it? How do we protect it? . . . A sterling valediction. Lopez’s many followers will treasure this book.”—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“How the World Really Works: The Science Behind How We Got Here and Where We’re Going” by Vaclav Smil — “You can agree or disagree with Smil—accept or doubt his ‘just the facts’ posture—but you probably shouldn’t ignore him. . . In Smil’s provocative but perceptive view, unrealistic notions about carbon reduction are partly, and ironically, attributable to the very productivity that societies achieved by substituting machine work, powered by fossil fuels, for draft animals and human laborers.”—The Washington Post

“How to Tell a Story: The Essential Guide to Memorable Storytelling From the Moth” by Meg Bowles — “Inspiring . . . This book . . . provides everything readers need to share their own personal narratives.”—Booklist

“Lakes: Their Birth, Life, and Death” by John Richard Saylor — “Saylor delivers science in a layperson’s language to detail their forms, how they’re created, how they’re miraculously sustained, and, yes, how they die. Revelations abound.”—Booklist

“Last Call at the Hotel Imperial: The Reporters Who Took on a World at War” by Deborah Cohen — “In her engrossing account of this era and the people who did more than simply report facts, Cohen successfully interweaves international events with personal histories, creating a narrative that is well-crafted and comprehensively researched. . . . The resulting history is both unique and memorable. —Library Journal (starred review)

“Makhno: Ukrainian Freedom Fighter” by Philippe Thirault — “In early 20th century Ukraine, anarchist Nestor Makhno, the son of peasants, was among the most heroic and colorful figures of the Russian Revolution, encouraging his people to find and embrace social and economic self-determination. This is his story, of a military strategist who tirelessly defied both the Bolsheviks and the Germans to protect his homeland.” — Amazon.com

“River of the Gods” by Candace Millard — “Millard’s research and very readable storytelling are admirable. . . Ultimately, the identity of the person who first discovered the source of the White Nile may be a trivial matter. Ms. Millard conscientiously investigates the issue, of course, but River of the Gods is compelling because she does justice to the psyches and behavior of Burton and Speke—keenly flawed but enthralling, sometimes marvelous people.” — Wall Street Journal

“Sidelined: How Women Manage & Mismanage Their Health” by Susan Salenger — “A well-written and empowering work about the challenges facing female patients.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Somewhere We are Human: Authentic Voices on Migration, Survival and New Beginnings” edited by Reyna Grande and Sonia Guinansaca — “Wide-ranging yet consistently affecting, these pieces offer a crucial and inspired survey of the immigrant experience in America.” — Publishers Weekly

“The Complete Guide to Food Allergies in Adults and Children” by Scott H. Sicherer — “An outstanding, comprehensive, easily understandable, and up-to-date resource for people with food allergies, as well as their parents and caregivers.” — Anna Nowak-Wegrzyn, MD, PhD, New York University Grossman School of Medicine

“The Flag, the Cross, and the Station Wagon: A Graying American Looks Back at his Suburban Boyhood and Wonders What the Hell Happened” by Bill McKibben — “Adept at factual storytelling and connecting the dots, earnest, caring, and funny, McKibben dovetails personal reckonings with an astute elucidation of our social justice and environmental crises, arguing wisely that facing the truth about our past is the only way forward to a more just and sustainable future.” ―Booklist, starred review

“The Greatest Polar Expedition of All Time: The Arctic Mission to the Epicenter of Climate Change” by Markus Rex — “This marvelous book brings us aboard a unique 21st-century Arctic expedition—science-driven, multi-national, unprecedented—as it sails into the epicenter of the worsening climate crisis. For anyone concerned about global warming—and that should be all of us —this book is essential reading. A contemporary classic!”
Ken McGoogan, author of Fatal Passage: The Story of John Rae, The Arctic Hero Time Forgot and Dead Reckoning: The Untold Story of the Northwest Passage

“The Insect Crisis: The Fall of the Tiny Empires That Run the World” by Oliver Milman — “In this well-researched, engagingly written, and refreshingly measured book, Oliver Milman reveals the profound and complex implications of insect decline. A necessary and timely wake-up call full of fascinating and often unexpected detail.” ― Hugh Raffles, author of Insectopedia

“The Last Days of the Dinosaurs: An Asteroid, Extinction, and the Beginning of the World” by Riley Black — “A real-life, natural history page-turning drama that is necessary reading for almost anyone interested in the history of life.” ―Library Journal, starred review

“The Savory Baker: 150 Creative Recipes, From Classic to Modern” by America’s Test Kitchen — “Baking is about a lot more than just desserts. This unique collection, one of the few to focus solely on the savory side of baking, explores a multitude of flavor possibilities. Get inspired by creative twists like gochujang-filled puff pastry pinwheels or feta-studded dill-zucchini bread. And sample traditional baked goods from around the world, from Chinese lop cheung bao to Brazilian pão de quejo.” — Annotation

“The Woodchuck Travels through the Garden Seasons” by Ron Krupp — “This seasoned Vermont gardener ….groups topics and plants through the seasons, interspersed with his brand of humor and art and quotes he has found relevant and inspiring. If you’re a gardener in the Green Mountain State, or similar climate, you’re bound to pick up some tips or different views on diverse topics from composting to climate change, from pesticides to poetry to publications to pollinators.” — Dr. Leonard Payne Perry – Horticulture Professor Emeritus, University of Vermont

“Unmasking Autism: Discovering the New Faces of Neurodiversity” by Devon Price — “Price’s accessible and compassionate writing shines, and readers will feel encouraged to embrace a new understanding of themselves. Its potential to help masked autistic adults, especially those from systemically marginalized backgrounds, makes this book essential for most collections.”—Library Journal (starred review)

“Vermont Heritage: Essays on the Green Mountain History, 1770-1920” by H. Nicholas Muller III and J. Kevin Graffagnino — “It includes essays on Vermont historiography, Ethan and Ira Allen, early Vermont printing, eighteenth-century Vermont politics, the War of 1812, Vermont’s reaction to the 1837–38 Patriote Rebellion, and aspects of Victorian Vermont. The authors offer reminiscences and reflections on their lengthy Vermont careers in a joint Introduction.” — Vermont Research Books

“Write for Your Life” by Anne Quindlen — The #1 New York Times best-selling novelist and author of A Short Guide to a Happy Life, using examples past, present and future, shows how writing connects us, to ourselves and those we cherish—and issues a clarion call to pick up the pen, and find yourself.” — Atlas Publishing

“You Don’t Know Us Negroes: And Other Essays” by Zora Neale Hurston — “This volume enables readers both steeped in and new to Hurston to discover her acerbic wit, her crisp prose, and the breadth of her artistic ability and interests …. an invaluable nonfiction companion to the collection of Hurston’s short stories.” — Booklist

PARENTING

“How to Raise an Antiracist” by Ibram X. Kendi — “A readable and approachable guide . . . Because of its scope, nearly all readers will come away from Kendi’s message more aware and having found a point of resonance in their own lives. Best-selling Kendi is an antiracism trailblazer and parents, educators, and everyone else who cares for children will seek his guidance.”—Booklist (starred review)

PICTURE BOOK

“You’re in Good Paws” by Maureen Fergus

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Whales: Diving Into the Unknown” by Casey Zakroff — “Zip, an enthusiastic beaked whale, is eager to share everything he can about whale pods by broadcasting his very own undersea podcast! He will travel across the global ocean interviewing a diverse assortment of whales and dolphins about their amazing behaviors and habitats, as well as their interactions with the human world. Can this one small whale tell the story of the whole ocean and the interconnectivity that affects us all?” — Baker & Taylor

YA FICTION

“We Contain Multitudes” by Sarah Henstra — “This is an absolutely extraordinary work of fiction that proves the epistolary novel is an art form. Kurl and Jo are characters to die for, emotionally compelling and empathetic. Their quotidian lives are riveting and their story unforgettable…not to be missed.”―Booklist, starred review

Categories
Highlighted New Arrivals

Trooper: The Heartwarming Story of the Bobcat Who Became Part of My Family by Forrest Bryant Johnson

“Whenever middle-aged desert tour guide Forrest Bryant Johnson went out on his daily walks into the Mojave, all was usually peaceful and serene. But one beautiful summer day in 1987, Forrest heard a cry of distress. Following the cries, he came upon a small bobcat kitten, injured, orphaned, and desperately in need of help. So Forrest took his new feline friend home for a night. But when the little “trooper” clearly needed some more time to recoup, that night turned into two nights, a week, and eventually nineteen years. And so Trooper became a part of the Johnson family.” — Baker & Taylor

Categories
Highlighted New Arrivals

From Hollywood with Love: The Rise and Fall (And Rise Again) of the Romantic Comedy by Scott Meslow

“Meslow tells lots of engaging making of stories (for example, how Pretty Woman was transformed from a fallen-woman tragedy into a Disney fairy tale), but it’s his overarching theme, that romantic comedies are much more than lovey-dovey fluff, that really holds our interest.” — Booklist

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – MAY 2022

ADULT FICTION

“Harmony Hill” by John S. Hall — “In 1941, sixteen-year-old Jubilant Brown is struggling to keep his family’s small dairy farm from going under. …Farming in Vermont is a hardscrabble existence requiring muscle and ingenuity, something Jubal is learning as he comes of age. He also faces the ins and outs of love as he navigates friendships with three very different, strong young women. …. Harmony Hill is an old-fashioned yarn about small-town life. Hayesville will capture your heart with its quirky characters who are much like the neighbors you’ve always known. And when the town is rocked by a terrible tragedy, it reveals the true colors of the townsfolk and their interwoven connections.” — Amazon.com

“House of Earth and Blood” by Sarah J. Maas — “A richly imagined tale spiced with snarky humor and smoldering romance.” ―Publishers Weekly

“The Liar’s Dictionary” by Eley Williams — “An audacious, idiosyncratic dual love story about how language and people intersect and connect, and about how far we’ll go to save what we’re passionate about…Showcases a delight in language that evokes both Nabokov and—more on point with its mix of playfulness, profundity, warmth, and heart—Ali Smith.” —NPR

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“From Hollywood with Love: The Rise and Fall (And Rise Again) of the Romantic Comedy” by Scott Meslow — “Meslow tells lots of engaging making of stories (for example, how Pretty Woman was transformed from a fallen-woman tragedy into a Disney fairy tale), but it’s his overarching theme, that romantic comedies are much more than lovey-dovey fluff, that really holds our interest.” — Booklist

“The Library: A Fragile History” by Andrew Pettegrew — “This sweeping history of libraries is outstanding…. A history of libraries from the ancient world to yesterday, it is fetchingly produced and scrupulously researched — a perfect gift for bibliophiles everywhere.”―Sunday Times

PARENTING

“The Addiction Inoculation: Raising Healthy Kids in a Culture of Dependence” by Jessica Lahey — “Lahey compassionately lays out the societal pressures that can result in toxic stress and aggressive behavior. . . . Foundational advice to steer young adults away from the urges and temptations that lead to substance abuse.” — Kirkus Reviews

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Shadow of the Bird” by Tim Porbert — “In the second installment of the award-winning, critically acclaimed Lightfall series, Bea and Cad continue their quest to stop Kest, the mythic bird who stole the sun. Perfect for middle grade fans of Amulet and Avatar the Last Airbender, Lightfall: Shadow of the Bird is another breathtaking journey into the magical world of Irpa, where epic battles and powerful creatures abound.” — Publisher’s Annotation

“Wings of Fire: The Brightest Night” by Tui Sutherland — “Sunny has always taken the Dragonet Prophecy very seriously, so Morrowseer’s devastating news changes everything–now she must forge a new identity, and find a way to stop the futile and destructive war between the dragon clans.” — Atlas Publishing

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

“A Quick & Easy Guide to Sex & Disability” by A. Andrews — “A great introduction to basic information many disabled people can use. With humor, real talk, and lovely illustrations featuring all kinds of bodies, this guide can help disabled people (and their partners) on their journey toward self-love, better communication, and confidence.” — Alice Wong, Founder and Director, Disability Visibility Project

YOUNG LOCAL AUTHORS

“I See a Der and a Fox” by Maddison

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – APRIL 2022

ADULT FICTION

“A Rogue’s Company” by Allison Montclair — “A saucy and witty romp…with an ear for characters’ unique lingo and language and an eye for period detail, Montclair’s Rogue is spot on.” —Historical Novel Society

“Early Morning Riser” by Katherine Heiny — “This touching and fizzy comic novel… makes the ordinary extraordinary. A deep awareness of the ways the potential for tragedy lies just beneath the surface of small-town life gives the proceedings a sense of gravity and holds the humor in perfect balance. This is a winner.”—Publishers Weekly, starred

“The Disappearing Act” by Catherine Steadman — “From the New York Times bestselling author of Something in the Water and Mr. Nobody comes “an unputdownable mystery about the nightmares that abound in the pursuit of Hollywood dreams” — (Caroline Kepnes, author of the You series). — Random House, Inc.

“The Indigo Girl” by Natasha Boyd — “Set on South Carolina’s plantations beginning in 1739, this excellent historical novel by Boyd (Eversea) is based on the true story of Eliza Lucas Pinckney (1722-1793). Sixteen-year-old Eliza Lucas is charged with running her father’s three heavily-mortgaged plantations while he pursues a military career in the Caribbean. …Kindhearted Eliza is independent and forward-thinking. She defies the Negro Act of 1740 and teaches her slaves to read, seeks their advice, and banishes the lash. …Add threats of war with Spain and the strict social and cultural codes for Southern women, and Boyd has crafted a captivating novel of Southern colonial history.” — PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, c2017.

“The Midnight Bargain” by C. L. Polk — “The author’s penetrating social critique and deeply felt depiction of one woman’s struggle for self-determination are balanced by her charming take on classic Regency romance…. An expertly concocted mélange of sweet romance and sharp social commentary.” —Kirkus (starred review)

“The School for Good Mothers” by Jessamine Chan –“Jessamine Chan’s infuriatingly timely debut novel, The School for Good Mothers, takes this widely accepted armchair quarterbacking of motherhood and ratchets it up to the level of a surveillance state — one that may read more like a preview than a dystopia, depending on your faith in the future of Roe v. Wade…chilling…clever.” —THE NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW

“West with Giraffes” by Lynda Rutledge — “[A] larger-than-life story about the power of both animal magnetism and human connection…witty, charming, and heartwarming.” ―Booklist

“While Justice Sleeps” by Stacey Adams –“A political-legal thriller that should hold the reader rapt from its opening line . . . to the extraordinary climactic courtroom scene that turns the plot upside down with ironic flair and utter conviction.”—Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

ADULT MYSTERY

“A Line to Kill” by Anthony Horowitz — “An effortless blend of humor and fair play…the often prickly relationship between the Watson-like Horowitz and the Holmes-like Hawthorne complements the intricate detective work worthy of a classic golden age whodunit.” — Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Gallows Court” by Martin Edwards — “Superb—a pitch-perfect blend of Golden Age charm and sinister modern suspense, with a main character to die for. This is the book Edwards was born to write.”—Lee Child, #1 New York Times bestselling author

“Game On: Tempting Twenty-Eight” by Janet Evanovich —  “Plum remains sassy, outspoken, brave, and definitely one-of-a-kind… a hilariously madcap, action-packed caper filled with crazy twists and some nail-biting suspense. [Game On] finds the irrepressible Stephanie and cohorts in absolutely top form.” —Booklist (starred review)

“Plymouth Undercover” by Pamela Kelley — “Meet Emma McCarthy, ….and her mother, Cindy… They’ve just inherited Court Street Investigations, a private detective agency—and its one part-time employee, eighty-year-old Mickey, a retired police detective. They expect typical cases like cheating spouses or workman’s comp, but when they are hired to find a local missing woman, they quickly learn that the agency also has a reputation for solving murders.” — Ingram Publishing Services

“The Book Supremacy” by Kate Carlisle — “[An] immensely satisfying page-turner of mystery.”–Jenn McKinlay, New York Times bestselling author

“The Man Who Died Twice” by Richard Osman — “Riveting. . . The twisty plot, knotty issues of relationships with life partners, and steadfast loyalty among the sleuths provide depth and poignancy. Those who prefer their mysteries with touches of spycraft, humor, and eccentricity will be well pleased.” —Publishers Weekly

“The Others” by Sarah Blau — “Singularly creepy . . .  Blau, an award-winning playwright in Israel, wades bravely . . . into issues of sex, religion and aging. The mystery is absorbing, but so is the passionate debate over how the world views women who decide not to have children — and how they view themselves.” — Sarah Lyall, New York Times Book Review

ADULT NON-FICTION

“Recovering from Narcissistic Abuse: How to Heal from Toxic Relationships and Emotional Abuse” by Priscilla Posey — “Recovering from narcissistic abuse and healing from a toxic relationship doesn’t have to be difficult. Even if you’ve tried other solutions which didn’t work before. This book is the solution.” — Amazon.com

“Trooper: The Heartwarming Story of the Bobcat Who Became Part of My Family” by Forrest Bryant Johnson –“Whenever middle-aged desert tour guide Forrest Bryant Johnson went out on his daily walks into the Mojave, all was usually peaceful and serene. But one beautiful summer day in 1987, Forrest heard a cry of distress. Following the cries, he came upon a small bobcat kitten, injured, orphaned, and desperately in need of help. So Forrest took his new feline friend home for a night. But when the little “trooper” clearly needed some more time to recoup, that night turned into two nights, a week, and eventually nineteen years. And so Trooper became a part of the Johnson family.” — Baker & Taylor

“When Harry met Minnie: A True Story of Love and Friendship” by Martha Teichner — “Teichner’s main themes are sure to warm readers in this cold coronavirus winter: the steadfast devotion between dogs and their owners, and the essential role friendship plays in sustaining both humans and their beloved pets … Teichner has learned that we all have the capacity to create and build new friendships and attachments at whatever age or stage of life. That such rewards are possible is the inspirational lesson for all the characters in ― and readers of ― this touching saga.” —The Washington Post

PARENTING

“Baby Sign Language Made Easy: 101 Signs to Start Communicating with Your Child Now” by Lane Rebelo — “Baby Sign Language Made Easy is a beautiful, easy-to-understand resource about how to learn and teach baby sign language to young children. Drawing on the benefits of baby sign language for both parent and child, Ms. Rebelo not only provides a thorough collection of useful signs, but shows you exactly how to introduce them to your child. This is a must-read for any parent eager to use baby sign language.” —Nina Garcia, author and parenting blogger at Sleeping Should Be Easy

BLUE/DVD MOVIES

“Jockey”
“Parallel Mothers”

JUVENILE FICTION

“The Christmas Pig” by J. K. Rowling — “Losing his favorite childhood toy on Christmas Eve, Jack and his new toy, the Christmas Pig, concoct a daring plan and embark on a magical journey to seek something lost—and to save the best friend Jack has ever known. By the internationally celebrated author of the Harry Potter series.” — Atlas Publishing

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Agent 9: Flood-a-geddon!” by James Burke — “A delightful graphic romp. With a blend of thrilling chase scenes and a generous helping of humor, this crowd pleaser should be catnip to fans of series like Aaron Blabey’s The Bad Guys. Spy aficionados will find this purr-fect.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Allergic” by Megan Wagner Lloyd — “Warm and well-paced… an encouraging tale for young readers engaging with the world of pets, family, and friendships.” — Publishers Weekly

“Amulet #1: The Stonekeeper” by Kazu Kibuishi — “When Emily and Navin’s mother is kidnapped by a tentacle creature on the first night inside their new home, Emily and Navin must figure out how to set things right and save their mother’s life. ” — Baker & Taylor

“Amulet #2: The Stonekeeper’s Curse” by Kazu Kibuishi — “Graphic novel star Kazu Kibuishi returns with his mysterious world full of new allies . . . and old enemies!Emily and Navin’s mother is still in a coma from the arachnopod’s poison, and there’s only one place to find help: Kanalis, the bustling, beautiful city of waterfalls. But when Em, her brother, and Miskit and the rest of the robotic crew aboard the walking house reach the city, they quickly realize that seeking help is looking for trouble, dangerous trouble.” — Scholastic

“Amulet #3: The Cloud Searchers” by Kazu Kibuishi — “This third book….. has the gaggle of heroes led by young Emily, the requisite prophecy fulfiller with unharnessed powers, searching for a fabled city in the clouds while dodging capture by evil elf overlords. Star Wars and Tolkien continue to loom large as influences, and the cinematically grand visuals of otherworldly scenery continue to be one of the series’ deftest draws. But plenty of action and complex characters (including a few who were bad guys not too long ago) will also satisfy.” — Ian Chipman. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2010.

“Amulet #4: The Last Council” by Kazu Kibuishi — “Stellar artwork, imaginative character design, moody color and consistent pacing.” — Publishers Weekly

“Amulet #5: Prince of the Elves” by Kazu Kibuishi — “A must for all fantasy fans.” — Kirkus Reviews

“Amulet # 6: Escape from Lucien” by Kazu Kibuishi — “Navin and his classmates journey to Lucien, a city ravaged by war and plagued by mysterious creatures, where they search for a beacon essential to their fight against the Elf King. Meanwhile, Emily heads back into the Void with Max, one of the Elf King’s loyal followers, where she learns his darkest secrets. The stakes, for both Emily and Navin, are higher than ever.” — Amazon.com

“Amulet #7: Firelight” by Kazu Kibuishi — “Emily, Trellis, and Vigo visit Algos Island, where they can access and enter lost memories. They’re hoping to uncover the events of Trellis’s mysterious childhood — knowledge they can use against the Elf King. What they discover is a dark secret that changes everything. Meanwhile, the Voice of Emily’s Amulet is getting stronger, and threatens to overtake her completely.” — Amazon.com

“Amulet #8: Supernova” by Kazu Kibuishi — “Emily has lost control of her Amulet and is imprisoned in the Void, where she must find a way to escape the influence of the Voice. Meanwhile, Emily’s brother, Navin, travels to Lighthouse One, a space station where the Resistance is preparing to battle the approaching Shadow forces that would drain planet Alledia of all its resources. Emily and Navin must be smarter and stronger than ever to ensure Alledia’s survival.” — Amazon.com

“Anne of Green Gables: A Graphic Novel” by Mariah Marsden — “L. M. Montgomery’s classic tale is delicately and lovingly transformed into a graphic novel…Though the original tale is abridged and adapted, Marsden is careful not to rush the plot…[Thummler’s] soft, pastel palette is a perfect complement to the historical setting, and her softly glowing art is the heart of this fitting tribute to a beloved work.” (Snow Wildsmith, Booklist)

“Baby-Sitters Little Sister: Karen’s Kittycat Club” by Katy Farina — “The full-color illustrations are bright and detailed, and the story is fast paced and relatable.” — School Library Journal

“Best Friends” by Shannon Hale — “A heart-stabbing tale of the everyday social agonies of girlhood.” ―Wall Street Journal

“Cat Kid Comic Club: Perspectives” by Dav Pilkey — “Irreverent, laugh-out-loud funny and… downright moving, it’s a heartfelt celebration of coming into one’s own as an artist, with all its frustrations and joys.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Cici’s Journal: Lost and Found” by Joris Chamblain — “Movingly shows how human life contains more mysteries than any hidden room or secret code.”―Kirkus

“Cici’s Journal: The Adventures of a Writer-in-Training” by Joris Chamblain —
“The lessons are breezy, but the art is sumptuous: Neyret’s naturalistic illustrations have marvelous depth, with dense color, dynamic movement, and a fantastic use of light and shadow.”―Booklist

“Dinosaurs Before Dark” by Jenny Laird — “The #1 bestselling chapter book is now a graphic novel! Magic. Mystery. Time-travel. Get whisked back in time in the magic tree house with Jack and Annie!” — Amazon.com

“Dog Man and Cat Kid” by Dav Pilkey — “Action and mystery abound on the movie set in the fourth Dog Man book from worldwide bestselling author and artist Dav Pilkey.” — Amazon.com

“Dog Man Unleashed” by Dav Pilkey — “Dog Man is still learning a few tricks of the trade. Petey the Cat is out of the bag, and his criminal curiosity is taking the city by storm. Something fishy is going on! Can Dog Man unleash justice on this ruffian in time to save the city, or will Petey get away with the purr-fect crime?” — Amazon.com

“Donut Feed the Squirrel” by Mika Song — “Two problem-solving squirrels stage a successful doughnut heist in this amusing start to a graphic novel series for emerging readers.” —Shelf Awareness, starred review

“Friends Forever” by Shannon Hale — “With the combination of Hale’s lucid writing and Pham’s masterful portrayal of body and language and facial expression, this books homes in squarely and affirmingly on teen angst and worries.” ―Booklist, starred review

“Garlic & the Vampire” by Bree Paulsen — “Gorgeous artwork featuring anthropomorphized plants and colors reminiscent of those used in Kate Greenaway stories make this a joy to read… Perfect for chapter-book readers and up, this will delight anyone wanting a light adventure heavy on friendship and self-actualization.” — Booklist

“HiLo: Book 1, The Boy Who Crashed to Earth” by Judd Winick — “A perfect book for any kid who ever needed a friend and then had one with superpowers fall from space.” —Seth Meyers, actor, comedian and writer

“HiLo: Book 2, Saving the Whole Wide World” by Judd Winick — “[A] lively and entertaining ADVENTURE with enough risk to give it heft and plenty of solid friendship to keep readers buoyed… Lush, bright colors and a freewheeling approach to panels create an immersive environment.”—Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, starred review

“HiLo: Book 3, The Great Big Boom” by Judd Winick — “Hilo the robot boy and his best friend DJ must team up to track down DJ’s pal Gina, who was swallowed by a mysterious portal. In the process, Hilo and DJ are reunited with old friends, make new friends, and unearth more secrets from Hilo’s past. This third installment in the series delivers humor and cartoony, over-the-top adventures that fans and new readers will delight in …” — Elizabeth Nicolai, Anchorage Public Library, AK

“HiLo: Book 4, Waking the Monsters” by Judd Winick –“Take off on an action packed adventure with HILO Book 4! Dog Manmeets Big Nate in this hilarious New York Times bestselling graphic novel series that kids love! Chock full of MORE MONSTERS! MORE ACTION! MORE LAUGHS! MORE FUN!” — Amazon.com

“HiLo: Book 5, Then Everything Went Wrong” by Judd Winick — “Alien-robot boy Hilo and his human friend D.J. travel to Hilo’s home planet in this fifth graphic novel. Meanwhile, back on Earth, Hilo’s sister Izzy and pal Gina try to keep the boys’ absence on the down-low. Tantalizing revelations about Hilo’s past; expressive, action-packed panels; and wacky, slapstick humor (a robot version of D.J. shoots nickels from his bellybutton) make for another satisfying series addition.” — THE HORN BOOK, c2019.

“HiLo: Book 6, All the Pieces Fit” by Judd Winick — “Being a hero isn’t easy. But Hilo had no idea it would be this hard. Hilo came to earth because he was running from Razorwark. But he’s done running. Razorwark has come to earth. And the time has come for one final face to face showdown. What happens will decide the fate of the robot world . . . and Hilo’s future. The sacrifice will be great. But with Izzy’s help, Hilo finally knows what he has to do. Because THIS is how all the pieces fit.” — Publisher Annotation

“Hilo: Book 7, Gina the Girl who Broke the World” by Judd Winick — “Hundreds of years ago, MAGIC disappeared from Earth. At least…UNTIL NOW. Because suddenly, giant magical beings are appearing and only GINA can see them. Not to mention, Gina can somehow do magic herself. Magic is powerful. But it can also be DANGEROUS. With DJ and HILO’s help, can Gina figure out how to protect the magical beings from the creatures who are after them? AND how to use her magic to become who she was always meant to be? And can she do it WITHOUT putting the entire PLANET in JEAPARDY?! Find out in Hilo 7–a laugh-out-loud, action packed adventure filled with epic battles! friendship! annoying older brothers! annoying older sisters! good guys! bad guys! inappriate jokes! mangoes! magic! and much, much more!” — Publisher Annotation:

“Hilo: Book 8, Gina and the Big Secret” by Judd Winick — “There’s a NEW Earth! The world’s timeline has been turned upside down, and now magical creatures are EVERYWHERE. Gina has to fix things–FAST! With DJ and HILO’s help, can Gina find the key to turn the world back to what it was? Find out in Hilo 8–a laugh-out-loud, action-packed adventure filled with epic battles! True friendship! Good jokes! Bad jokes! Giant (hilarious) monsters! Spoiled royals! Prophecies! Good! Evil! And much, much more!” — Onix Annotations

“Little Monarchs” by Jonathan Case — “[A] prescient, thrilling, unusual and occasionally hilarious graphic novel. . . . Just about everything one might need to survive post-apocalyptic life on Earth is packed into these colorful pages. . . . Save the planet—read this book!”—Shelf Awareness, Starred Review

“Lord of the Fleas” by Dav Pilkey — ‘When a fresh bunch of baddies bust up the town, Dog Man is called into action — and this time he isn’t alone. With a cute kitten and a remarkable robot by his side, our heroes must save the day by joining forces with an unlikely ally: Petey, the World’s Most Evil Cat. But can the villainous Petey avoid vengeance and venture into virtue?” — Amazon.com

“Max Meow: Donuts and Danger” by John Gallagher — “Meowza! Max was just getting used to being a SECRET SUPER HERO when his and his best friend Mindy’s evil look-alikes show up in Kittyopolis! And what’s worse, they’re determined to take over the world’s donut supply–and Max and Mindy are getting blamed! Can Max and Mindy work together to save the day–and the donuts?! Find out in Max Meow Book 2: Donuts and Danger! A deliciously funny, action-packed new series that’s so good you’ll want seconds!” — Publisher Annotation:

“Max Meow: Pugs from Planet X” by John Gallagher — “Meowza! Space pugs have landed in Kittyopolis and they’re after the SPACE MEATBALL that gave Max his powers! Can Max and Mindy save Kittyopolis?!” — Amazon.com

“Mighty Jack” by Ben Hatke — “Jack foolishly trades the family car for a packet of seeds. He’s thrilled when his younger sister (who doesn’t speak) cares for the garden, but these seeds yield a sinister menagerie of sentient plant creatures. Graphic novelist Hatke employs a vibrant color palette dominated by verdant greens and with a panel layout that segues seamlessly between dialogue and action–all to terrific effect.” — THE HORN BOOK, c2017.

“Mighty Jack and the Goblin King” by Ben Hatke — “Full-bleedpages with hordes of fantastic monsters rendered in wild, organic shapes, and he further enlivens the story with snappy, comical dialogue.” ―Booklist

“Mighty Jack and Zita the Spacegirl” by Ben Hatke — “Hatke’s latest adventure is a wonderful and exciting page-turner, seamlessly blending dragons, giants, robots, and portals to other worlds, creating instant appeal for almost any young fan of graphic novels, fantasy, fairy tales, or science fiction…Perfection.” ―Kirkus,starred review

“Pilu of the Woods” by Mai K. Nguyen — “In Pilu of the Woods, Nguyen has crafted a sweet, gentle, beautifully-illustrated fable about childhood loss, and the friends who help us find ways to grow, even through the hardest times.” — Melanie Gillman (Steven Universe, As the Crow Flies)

“Real Friends” by Shannon Hale — “A wonderfully observed portrait of finding one’s place in your world.” ―Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Salt Magic” by Hope Larson — “An absorbing and fast-paced historical fantasy adventure. Mock’s illustrations make every enchanting, dangerous moment pop. Salt Magicis a feast of a tale that treats readers to an epic battle between evil forces and a courageous, persistent young hero.”—BookPage

“Sort of Super” by Eric Gapstur — “When his dad makes him hide his super powers, 11-year-old Wyatt Flynn, going behind his back, decides to make a difference in the community and teams up with his little sister to fight crime.” — Atlas Publishing

“Spider-Ham: Great Power, No Responsibility” by Steve Foxe — “… After long being derided by the citizens of New York, Spider-Ham has finally been recognized for his outsized contribution to the city’s safety, and receives the key to the city from none other than the mayor (and, being a cartoon universe, the key actually unlocks New York City’s political and financial institutions). Sure, it’s just a publicity stunt for the beleaguered mayor-and yeah, maybe every single other super hero was busy that day — but an award is an award! Of course, Spider-Ham isn’t paying attention to the fine print telling him he didn’t actually get to keep the key, and he swings off without returning the highly coveted oversized object.” — Publisher Annotation:

“Spy School: The Graphic Novel” by Stuart Gibbs — “Ben Ripley is recruited for a magnet school with a focus on science-but he’s entirely shocked to discover that the school is actually a front for a junior C.I.A. academy. Ben becomes an undercover agent and goes on his first assignment in this graphic novel adaptation of SPY SCHOOL”– Baker & Taylor

“The Amber Anthem” by Mark Siegel — “While Oona Lee and her friends search for the Amber Anthem on Salassandra to protect the Five Worlds from the evil Mimic, Stan Moon dispatches an evil Jax robot to assassinate the team while he tracks down a Vanishing Illness-infected An Tzu.” — Atlas Publishing

“The Aquanaut” by Dan Santat — “The art in this graphic tale is something special… Santat’s vividly expressive visuals are, even more than usual, riveting.” — Kirkus Reviews

“The Baby-Sitters Club: Good-Bye Stacey, Good-Bye” by Gabriela Epstein — “Members of the Baby-sitter’s Club are devastated to learn that Stacey is moving back to New York, especially her best friend Claudia, and wonder how they’ll survive without her.” — Atlas Publishing

“The Bad Guys” by Aaron Blabey — “The Bad Guys, Mr. Wolf, Mr. Shark, Mr. Snake, and Mr. Piranha, want to be heroes, and they decide that the way to do it is free the 200 dogs in the city dog pound–but their plan soon goes awry.” — Baker & Taylor

“The Bad Guys in Alien vs Bad Guys” by Aaron Blabey — They may look like Bad Guys, but these wannabe heroes are doing good deeds…whether you like it or not! This New York Times bestselling illustrated series is perfect for fans of Dog Man and Captain Underpants.The Bad Guys are vanishing! A creature with TONS of teeth and WAY too many butts is stealing them, one by one. Is this the end for the Bad Guys? Maybe. Will it be funny? You bet your butts it will!” — Publisher’s Annotation

“The Bad Guys in Attack of the Zittens” — “[T]his book instantly joins the classic ranks of Captain Underpants and The Stinky Cheese Man. We challenge anyone to read this and keep a straight face.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review*

“The Bad Guys in Cut to the Chase” by Aaron Blabey — “I wish I’d had these books as a kid. Hilarious!” — Dav Pilkey, creator of Captain Underpants and Dog Man

“The Bad Guys in do-you-think-he-saurus?!” by Aaron Blabey — “The Bad Guys have flown through outer space, made it back to Earth, and managed to land in exactly the right place… but exactly the wrong TIME. Who knew alien escape pods were capable of time travel?!? And now that they’re 65 million years in the past, they must avoid being eaten by dinosaurs and fix their broken time machine if they ever want to get back home before an evil alien destroys the whole world!” — Back Cover

“The Bad Guys in Intergalactic Gas” by Aaron Blabey — “The bad news? The world is ending. The good news? The Bad Guys are back to save it! Sure, they might have to “borrow” a rocket. And there might be something nasty in one of the spacesuits. And Mr. Piranha miiiiight have eaten too many bean burritos. Surviving this mission may only be one small step for man, but it’s one giant leap for the Bad Guys.” — Back Cover

“The Bad Guys in Mission Unpluckable” by Aaron Blabey — “The Bad Guys’ Next Mission? Rescue 10,000 chickens from a high-tech cage farm. But they are up against sizzling lasers, one feisty tarantula, and their very own Mr. Snake…who’s also known as “The Chicken Swallower.” What could possibly go wrong? Get ready to laugh up your lunch with the baddest bunch of do-gooders in town!” — Back Cover

“The Bad Guys in Superbad” by Aaron Blabey — “The Bad Guys have strangely acquired SUPERPOWERS! But their powers might be, well, defective. They can only do things like blow their own pants off in public. Not exactly what you’d call hero-caliber skills.Defective or not, the Bad Guys have a job to do. With Dr. Marmalade ready to destroy the world, Mr. Wolf, Mr. Snake, Mr. Piranha, and Mr. Shark finally have their chance to be (super)heroes! And this time, they may just get some help…” — Amazon.com

“The Bad Guys in the Baddest Day Ever” by Aaron Blabey — “All hail Crown Prince Marmalade! Surrender to his evil magnificence! Kneel before his butt-handed glory! Or…like…DON’T! The Bad Guys and even Badder Girls might have been knocked down, but does that mean they’ll stay down? No way, chicos! Pull on your party pants-it’s the ultimate battle between Bad and BAAAAAAD!” — Amazon.com

“The Bad Guys in the Big Bad Wolf” by Aaron Blabey — “When Mr. Wolf is blown up to Godzilla proportions, the Bad Guys find themselves in monster-sized trouble. They must figure out how to stop an alien invasion and get Wolfie back to his old self before the world is totally destroyed. Good thing they have the International League of Heroes on their side, and some newly honed superpowers ready to put to the test…Everyone’s favorite hero has become a menace to society! Can the Bad Guys save the day? You know it!” — Amazon.com

“The Bad Guys in the Dawn of the Underlord” by Aaron Blabey — “The Bad Guys – sorry, Shadow Squad-G – have finally saved the world from butt-handed evil. And now it’s time to celebrate! But when one member of the team makes a shocking discovery, the party might be over sooner than everyone thinks…” — Amazon.com

“The Bad Guys in the Furball Strikes Back” by Aaron Blabey — “The Bad Guys are about to have a very BAD day!Mr. Wolf and his bad buddies have messed with the wrong guinea pig — one who is secretly an evil mad scientist. And the nasty little furball wants revenge! Will they survive? Will they be heroes? And will they ever stop trying to eat each other?!?It’s time for the Bad Guys to spring into action!” — Amazon.com

“The Bad Guys in the One?!” by Aaron Blabey — “Seriously, WHAT is going on with Snake?! Terrible powers have been revealed! Evil allies have materialized! Inter-dimensional doors have opened! Shady-looking cloaks have been purchased! What is his deal?!And that’s not all! Why does Agent Fox suddenly have a whole lot more backstory than we’d counted on?! Dang it! We need answers! WHAT IS GOING ON HERE?!Wolf and the gang are back. And things are worse than ever. Or badder than ever… if you think that sounds cooler and don’t have a problem with bad grammar…” — Amazon.com

“The Bad Guys in They’re Bee-hind You!” by Aaron Blabey — “POP QUIZ! You are on the roof of a skyscraper. Every floor of that building has nasty things that just don’t like you. And you REALLY need to get to the basement. Whaddaya do?! (And no, you can’t just join the B-Team and fly away in their glamorous new spaceship.) Think quick, chico, because the multiverse is getting worse!” — Amazon.com

“The Cobalt Prince” by Mark Siegel — “A dazzling interplanetary fantasy . . . that will easily appeal to fans of Naruto or Avatar: The Last Airbender.” —Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

“The Creepy Case File of Margo Maloo” by Drew Weing — “With a saturated color palette, noirish dialogue, and a thought-provoking message about gentrification, this first in a series (originally published as a webcomic) is packed with warm laughs and smart, spooky mystery.”―Booklist

“The Creepy Case Files of Margo Maloo: 2, The Monster Mall” by Drew Weing —
“Weing’s artwork further adds to the lighthearted fun: his detailed backgrounds, jewel-toned color palette, only slightly spooky monsters, and stylish character designs give this lots of visual appeal. Fans of the first installment won’t want to miss this sequel.” ―Booklist

“The Creepy Case Files of Margo Maloo: 3, The Tangled Web” by Drew Weing — “In the third volume of this beloved graphic novel series The Creepy Case Files of Margo Maloo: The Tangled Web, Drew Weing delivers a fresh and funny take on the age-old battle between kids and closet-dwelling monsters.” — Amazon.com

“The Emerald Gate” by Mark Siegel — “In this electrifying conclusion to the graphic sci-fi fantasy series, Oona, Jax and An Tzu must find the green beacon on a dangerous planet as the final battle looms while fighting off the evil Stan Moon in order to save the 5 Worlds.” — Atlas Publishing

“The Fifth Quarter” by Mike Dawson — “Sixth grade is here! Just when Lori starts to get comfortable, things change again. Lori’s friends have found new interests. Her dad goes back to work for the first time since she was born. And when her mom decides to start coaching in the new after-school basketball league, Lori’s home life collides with her passion. To make matters worse, all her friends are playing for the opposing team. Lori feels frustrated and alone, like she might be falling behind in her game.” — Amazon.com

“The Flower Garden” by Renee Kurilla — “A cheery, colorful jaunt through a garden gnome’s world, arranged lovingly and thoughtfully in graphic novel form. . .promises to be an enjoyable read for both eager and hesitant beginning ­readers.” ―School Library Journal

“The Golden Hour” by Niki Smith — “With a soft start and a gentle build, Smith’s graphic novel details the realities of Manuel’s trauma response while reveling in subdued, generous scenes that showcase the three friends’ everyday joys.”―Publishers Weekly, starred review

“The Knight at Dawn” by Jenny Laird — “A castle. A knight. A quest! When the magic tree house whisks Jack and Annie back to the Middle Ages, they’re looking for a knight. Instead, they find the Great Hall of a castle where a feast is under way. But Jack and Annie aren’t exactly welcome guests!” — Amazon.com

“The Legend of Brightblade” by Ethan M. Aldridge — “Aldridge paints a beautiful medieval fantasy. Bright watercolors bring energy to the elegant designs—detailed enough for rich world building, simple enough for young readers—and the magic system based on making music, no small feat for a graphic novel, really shines. An excellent option for budding fans of fantasy.” — Booklist

“The Red Maze” by Mark Siegel –“A dazzling interplanetary fantasy . . . that will easily appeal to fans of Naruto or Avatar: The Last Airbender.” —Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

“The Rema Chronicles: Realm of the Blue Mist” by Kazu Kibuishi — “The full-color, Japanese manga-flavored art style is fluid and natural, highlighting expressiveness, action, and alien-world details with ease. A fast-paced journey through an engrossing new world.” — Kirkus Reviews

“The Sand Warrior” by Mark Siegel — “This sweeping graphic-novel saga features inventive world-building, with history, mythology, and traditions naturally integrated into the narrative. The installment ends triumphantly and tantalizingly; readers will eagerly await book two.” —The Horn Book Magazine

“The Secret Garden on 81st Street” by Ivy Noelle Weir –“The Secret Garden with a twist: in this follow-up to Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy, this full-color graphic novel moves Mary Lennox to a New York City brownstone, where she and her very first group of friends restore an abandoned rooftop garden…and her uncle’s heart.” — Annotation

“The Tea Dragon Festival” by Katie O’Neill — “Aedhan is a young dragon who was appointed to protect the village, but fell asleep in the forest eighty years ago. With the aid of Rinn’s adventuring uncle Erik and his partner Hesekiel, they investigate the mystery of his enchanted sleep… but Rinn’s real challenge is to help Aedhan come to terms with feeling that he cannot get back the time he has lost.” — Baker & Taylor

“The Tea Dragon Society” by Katie O’Neill — “After discovering a lost tea dragon in the marketplace, Greta learns about the dying art form of tea dragon caretaking from the kind tea shop owners, Hesekiel and Erik. As she befriends them and their shy ward, Minette, Greta sees how the craft enriches their lives—and eventually her own.” — Amazon.com

“The Tea Dragon Tapestry” by Katie O’Neill — “As Greta struggles to impress a master blacksmith in search of an apprentice, she questions the true meaning of crafting, while Minette receives a surprise package from the monastery where she was once training to become a prophetess.” — Baker & Taylor

“Tidesong” by Wendy Xu — “Xu gives her solo debut fresh allure with richly evoked Chinese mythology–inspired dragons and a supporting cast of idiosyncratic, endearing characters.” — Publishers Weekly

“Twins” by Varian Johnson — “The sibling bond is palpable and precious as each conflict and triumph pushes them apart or pulls them together…. A touching, relatable story of identity, sisterhood, and friendship.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Volcanoes: Fire and Life” by Jon Chad — “Chad’s well-drawn and clearly labeled diagrams in rich, saturated colors concisely explain key concepts, and vocabulary words are defined both in the text and a glossary. While the stylized cartoon figures and adventure narrative are an entertaining framework, the science fittingly occupies the center stage.” ―Booklist

“Wingbearer” by Marjorie M. Liu — “Wondrously constructed. Nail-biting stakes, staggeringly good action sequences, and characterization and world-building as rich as in any prose novel make this series opener an effortless recommendation.” — New York Times Book Review

“Wings of Fire: The Dark Secret” by Barry Deutsch based on Tui Sutherland’s book — “When Starflight is kidnapped by the NightWings he finds that the kingdom of his birth is a miserable place, full of terrible secrets–and that, with his fellow dragonets too far away to help, the fate of two kingdoms rests in his talons.” — Baker & Taylor

JUVENILE MUSIC

“Captain and Sea Monsters” by Rockin’ Ron the Friendly Pirate

JUVENILE NON-FICTION

“Dancing with Granddad: An Alzheimer’s Story for Children and Their Families” by Linda Bozzo — “Dancing with Granddad takes young readers on an age-appropriate learning journey with Nia, a 7-year-old girl, whose grandfather has Alzheimer’s and will need to move to a new home where he will be safer. Readers also learn that while he is changing, the love that Nia and her grandfather have never will.” — Alzheimer’s Association of America

YOUNG ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“All Boys Aren’t Blue” by George M. Johnson — “The conversational tone will leave readers feeling like they are sitting with an insightful friend . . . This young adult memoir is a contemporary hallmark of the blossoming genre. Johnson anchors the text with encouragement and realistic guidance for queer Black youth.” ―School Library Journal

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

“A Spark Within the Forge” by Nicole Andelfinger — “An all-new official standalone graphic novel prequel to the New York Times best-selling YA series An Ember in the Ashes novels from creator Sabaa Tahir!” — Publisher’s Annotation

“A Thief Among the Trees” by Nicole Andelfinger — “Taking place years before the bestselling An Ember in the Ashes novel series, this standalone original graphic novel follows three young military recruits: Elias, Helene, and Tavi, during their brutal training as soldiers for the Martial Empire. ” — Amazon.com

“Almost American Girl: An Illustrated Memoir” by Robin Ha — “Touching and subtly humorous, this emotive memoir is as much about the steadfast bond between a mother and daughter as it is about the challenges of being an immigrant in America.” — Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Anne of West Philly” by Ivy Noelle Weir — “Anne of Green Gables with a twist: in this follow-up to Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy and The Secret Garden on 81st Street, this full-color graphic novel moves Anne Shirley to modern-day West Philadelphia, where where she finds new friends, new rivals, and a new family.” — Amazon.com

“Avatar the Last Airbender: Toph Beifong’s Metalbending Academy” by Faith Erin Hicks — “Things are looking bright at the Beifong Metalbending Academy! But after all the adventures Toph’s had with Aang, Sokka, Zuko, and Katara, the whole thing feels a bit dull. Luckily, Sokka and Suki come to visit and reintroduce some familiar faces from their wandering days. And while out and about to celebrate, Toph discovers something that just might put the sparkle back in her eye…” — Amazon.com

“Between Shades of Gray” by Ruta Sepetys — “At once a suspenseful, drama-packed survival story, a romance, and an intricately researched work of historial fiction.” —The Wall Street Journal

“Crushing” by Sophie Burrows — “A charming graphic novel debut . . . that recommends optimism and a wry sense of humor while acknowledging the ubiquity of loneliness.” —Publishers Weekly

“Displacement” by Kiku Hughes — “Art features straightforward linework with full-color, often spare backgrounds that focus on characters. …Hughes centers [Kiku’s] powerlessness to create a compelling story about an oft-overlooked period of U.S. aggression against its own citizens.”―Publisher’s Weekly

“Eighty Days” by A. C. Esquerra — “A pilot wants nothing more than to fly. Or so he thought, until he crosses paths with a mysterious thief whose tricks draw him into unchartered territory and new adventure. In a life where the truth changes as quickly as clouds in the sky, the pilot must decide for himself what freedom really means.” — Amazon.com

“Fine: A Comic about Gender” by Rhea Ewing — “[A] wondrous tapestry of personal reflections and meditations on how people view subjects like gender, masculinity, femininity, and community . . . Ewing’s art beautifully reflects the individuality and wishes of their subjects . . . Recommended for everyone who cares about better understanding the complicated, varied, gorgeous mess that is gender.” ― Sarah Rice, Booklist, starred review

“Frank Herbert’s Dune:The Graphic Novel: Book 1” by Brian Herbert — “Intricate . . . well defined . . . easy to follow . . . blending the aristocratic costumery, sci-fi technology, and desert landscape into a world that is unmistakably Dune.”―Booklist

“Frieren: Beyond Journey’s End. Vol 1” by Kanehito Yamada — “Elf mage Frieren and her courageous fellow adventurers have defeated the Demon King and brought peace to the land. But Frieren will long outlive the rest of her former party. How will she come to understand what life means to the people around her? Decades after their victory, the funeral of one her friends confronts Frieren with her own near immortality. Frieren sets out to fulfill the last wishes of her comrades and finds herself beginning a new adventure…” — Baker & Taylor

“Frieren: Beyond Journey’s End Vol. 2” by Kanehito Yamada — “At Eisen’s urging, Frieren and her apprentice Fern head north seeking the land where heroes’ souls are said to rest, which also happens to be the location of the Demon King’s castle. Along the way, they meet Eisen’s apprentice, whose fighting skills may come in handy—though the Demon King is long gone, his surviving minions have unfinished business with Frieren!” — Amazon.com

“Frieren: Beyond Journey’s End Vol. 3” by Kanehito Yamada — “An old enemy returns as Frieren continues her journey north. Decades ago, Frieren and her party defeated a servant of the Demon King called Aura the Guillotine, one of the powerful demons known as the Seven Sages of Destruction. Now Aura is back with a score to settle. But what price did Frieren pay for victory in the past, and how will the choices she made then affect the present?” — Amazon.com

“Go With the Flow” by Lily Williams — “…the story is firmly grounded in the realities faced by girls and women, and the timely messages of empowerment and political dialogue will resonate with socially minded youth.” Booklist

“Graceling” by Gareth Hinds — “This is at its heart much more than just an adventure story: It is a story that looks at consent and power over others and a romance between two people dealing with the ways control over themselves affects the larger world—and their hearts as well…. An adaptation of a YA classic that is sure to draw in new fans.” — Kirkus Reviews

“Heartstopper: Volume 1” by Alice Osman — “Realistic yet uplifting, this tale of self-discovery will make readers’ hearts skip a beat.” — School Library Journal

“Heartstopper: Volume 2” by Alice Osman — “Nick and Charlie are best friends, but one kiss has changed everything. In the aftermath, Charlie is sure that Nick isn’t interested, but Nick is more confused than ever.Love works in surprising ways, and Nick comes to see the world from a new perspective. He discovers all sorts of things about his friends, his family… and himself.” — Amazon.com

“Heartstopper: Volume 3” by Alice Osman –“Charlie didn’t think Nick could ever like him back, but now they’re officially boyfriends. Nick has even found the courage to come out to his mom.But coming out isn’t something that happens just once, and Nick and Charlie try to figure out when to tell their friends that they’re dating. Not being out to their classmates gets even harder during a school trip to Paris. As Nick and Charlie’s feelings get more serious, they’ll need each other more than ever.” — Amazon.com

“Heartstopper: Volume 4” by Alice Osman — “Charlie and Nick’s relationship has been going really well, and Charlie thinks he’s ready to say those three little words: I love you.

Nick feels the same way, but he’s got a lot on his mind — especially the thought of coming out to his dad and the fact that Charlie might have an eating disorder.

As a new school year begins, Charlie and Nick will have to learn what love really means.” — Amazon.com

“Himawari House” by Harmony Becker — “Becker’s art is intricate and rich at times, quick and playful at others. The story will tug at your heartstrings and make you laugh. All told, “Himawari House” will comfort young readers who are imagining their lives ahead and trigger nostalgic joy in older readers looking back.” ―New York Times

“In the Shadow of the Fallen Towers: The Seconds, Minutes, Hours, Days, Weeks, Months, and Years After the 9/11 Attacks” by Don Brown — “Notable is Brown’s ability to depict, in this economical format, the event’s wide-ranging aftereffects, including Islamophobia, the physical and mental health toll on workers dismantling “the Pile,” and U.S. soldiers ending up on horseback in Afghanistan.” –Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Invincible Iron Man: Ironheart” by Brian Michael Bendis — “A new Iron Age begins! From the violent streets of Chicago, a new armored hero rises! Clad in her very own Iron Man armor, Riri Williams is ready to show the world what she can do as the self-made hero of tomorrow. Her technology just might change the face of the Marvel Universe forever…if she survives the experience. But is she ready for all the problems that come with stepping into Iron Man’s jet boots? Where’s a genius billionaire playboy philanthropist when you need one?” — Amazon.com

“Invincible Iron Man: Ironheart Choices” by Brian Michael Bendis — “The whole world loves Riri Williams, A.K.A. Ironheart! Well, except for those who have a bone to pick with how she’s doing the job. And the deadly villain who’d like to take a piece out of her. Come to think of it, that’s a whole lot of people who aren’t that fond of her! What’s a girl to do? Striking out on her own, Riri has her idealism put to the test by a world she doesn’t yet understand. How far will she go to do what she knows is right? And how can she handle the biggest threat she’ll ever encounter: a headstrong Tony Stark A.I. that’s decided it knows what’s best for the world? Plus: An international incident sets the stage for one of the biggest Iron Man stories ever!” — Publisher’s Annotation

“Let’s Talk About It :The Teen’s Guide to Sex, Relationships, and Being a Human” by Erika Moen — “A refreshingly inclusive read…. offering comprehensive, no-nonsense information on sex and sexuality.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Lore Olympus: Volume 1” by Rachel Smythe — “Sensitive and elegant . . . Beautiful artwork and compelling characters [take] the forefront of this romantic, tech-savvy retelling of Greek mythology.” —Booklist

“Magical Boy” by The Kao — “Descended from a long line of Magical Girls tasked with defending humanity from a dark, ancient evil, Max, an average high school trans boy, wonders if he can take on his destiny, save the world and become the new Magical Boy.” — Atlas Publishing

“Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy” by Rey Terciero — “[…] this tale offers a contemporary vision of sisterhood that will appeal to a diverse audience.”―Kirkus

“Mooncakes” by Suzanne Walker — “This graphic novel is the joyful fantasy romance we all need right now, and it might just restore your faith in magic.” — Charlie Jane Anders, author of All the Birds in the Sky

“Mouse Guard: Volume 3, The Black Axe” by David Petersen — “This prequel, set in 1115, fulfills the promise the wise oldfur Celanawe made to tell Lieam of the day his paw first touched the Black Axe. The arrival of distant kin takes Celanawe on an adventure that will carry him across the sea to uncharted waters and lands all while unraveling the legend of Farrer, the blacksmith who forged the mythic axe.” — Publisher’s Annotation

“Other Boys” by Damian Alexander — “Damian Alexander traces with poignant accuracy the story of boys who find themselves erased at a certain age. This book should be read by queer kids and parents alike.”
Garrard Conley, New York Timesbestselling author of Boy Erased

“Shang-Chi: Brothers and Sisters” by Gene Luen Yang — “THE MASTER RETURNS! An ancient and evil secret society has stayed in hiding since the death of their leader, Zheng Zhu. But now his successor has been chosen to shift the balance of power in the world…Zheng Zhu’s son, Shang-Chi! Witness the Marvel Universe’s greatest fighter return to a world of death and destruction he thought he left behind long ago…and discover the secrets to Shang-Chi’s past that will change his world forever.” — Grand Central Pub

“Shang-Chi: Shang-Chi vs. the Marvel Universe” by Gene Luen Yang — “…The martial arts master and his family are back — and this time, they’re colliding head-to-head with Earth’s biggest and best heroes! Shang-Chi has finally taken his place as the leader of the Five Weapons Society. But using a secret evil organization as a force for good won’t be easy. And it’s about to get a lot harder when Shang-Chi’s fellow super heroes — including the amazing Spider-Man — start to see him as the bad guy! …” — Publisher’s Annotation

“Solo: Leveling: 1” by Chugong — “Known as the the Weakest Hunter of All Mankind, E-rank hunter Jinwoo Sung’s contribution to raids amounts to trying not to get killed. Unfortunately, between his mother’s hospital bills, his sister’s tuition, and his own lack of job prospects, he has no choice but to continue to put his life on the line. So when an opportunity arises for a bigger payout, he takes it…only to come face-to-face with a being whose power outranks anything he’s ever seen! With the party leader missing an arm and the only healer a quivering mess, can Jinwoo some­how find them a way out?” — Publisher’s Annotation

“Solo: Leveling 2” by Chugong — “ARISE! Once dubbed the Weakest Hunter of All Mankind, Jinwoo is now…well, something else entirely. Armed with his mysterious system, he’s currently powerful enough to single-handedly clear dungeons that once would have proven life-threatening. He just has to ready himself to take on the Demon’s Castle—and what better way to do so than finishing a quest? Exclusive new weapons and skills from an assassin-class job may be just what Jinwoo needs… but the system seems to have other plans for him!” — Publisher’s Annotation

“Spinning” by Tillie Walden — “Tillie Walden’s Spinning is an engrossing, gorgeously quiet look back at the 12 years she devoted to figure and synchronized skating.” ―New York Times

Teen Titans: Beast Boy” by Kami Garcia — “Author Kami Garcia (Beautiful Creatures) and artist Gabriel Picolo, the creative duo behind the New York Times, USA Today, and Publishers Weekly bestseller Teen Titans: Raven, take you on a journey of self-discovery and acceptance, while reminding us the value of true friendship–especially when life gets wild.” — Publisher’s Annotation

“Teen Titans: Raven” by Kami Garcia — “Picolo’s spare, effective use of color and slightly edgy art helps situate the story in a supernaturally tinged world of high-school drama. …Garcia’s exploration of the connection between memory and identity offers a promising entrée to the Teen Titans series.” —Publishers Weekly

“The Enemy Delusion” by Claudia Gray — “In this second book of a graphic novel trilogy, two teenagers on opposite sides of the same extinction-level event get drawn deeper into conspiracies that could doom them–if the planet doesn’t self-destruct first.” — Random House, Inc.

“The Greatest Thing” by Sarah Winifred Searle — “Set in an era when landline phones were still in use, the story explores sexuality, mental health, and the messiness that goes with understanding of self in ways that will resonate with contemporary readers.”―Kirkus

“The Magic Fish” by Trung Le Nguyen — “A sparkling debut…about the child of Vietnamese immigrants who teaches through fairy tales—yet wrestles with how to come out to his family.” —The Washington Post

“The Mars Challenge: The Past, Present, and Future of Human Spaceflight” by Alison Wilgus — “Travel to deep space and back again with The Mars Challenge, a nonfiction graphic novel for teens about the science and logistics of a manned mission to Mars.” — Amazon.com

“The Prince and the Dressmaker” by Jen Wang — “Leave it to such a gifted artist to create this love letter to aesthetic design set against the story of a relationship blossoming between seamstress and prince.” ―Washington Post, from their “10 Best Graphic Novels of 2018”

“The Shadow Threat” by Claudia Gray — “Welcome to a brand-new vision of one of comics’ most famous tragedies, from New York Times bestselling author Claudia Gray and illustrator Eric Zawadzki. In this first graphic novel in a trilogy, explore Krypton like never before: through the eyes of two young people on opposite sides of the same extinction-level event. ” — Amazon.com

“The Subtle Knife” by Stephanie Melchior-Durand — “In this graphic adaptation of Pullman’s classic, Will, a boy from our world in search of his father, stumbles upon a window into another world. There, he meets Lyra and her dæmon, Pantalaimon, who have traveled from their own world, leaving behind both allies and enemies, in search of answers about the ineffable Dust. The art shines when depicting the fantastical worlds the characters inhabit, including sweeping landscapes and cityscapes.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Wake: The Hidden History of Women-led Slave Revolts” by Rebecca Hall — “A vividly illustrated account of Black women rebels that combines elements of memoir, archival research, and informed imaginings of its subjects’ lives…. An urgent, brilliant work of historical excavation.”—Kirkus *starred review*

“Witch Hat Atelier” by Kamome Shirahama — “A beautifully-illustrated story about a girl who longs for magic in her life and learns that, on the inside, she already is what she wishes she could be. Reminiscent of Studio Ghibli, this lushly-drawn story has captured the hearts of fantasy fans worldwide.” — Amazon.com

Categories
Highlighted New Arrivals

Stolen Focus: Why You Can’t Pay Attention and How to Think Deeply Again by Johann Hari

“In his unique voice, Johann Hari tackles the profound dangers facing humanity from information technology and rings the alarm bell for what all of us must do to protect ourselves, our children, and our democracies.”—Hillary Clinton

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – MARCH 2022

ADULT FICTION

“A House Between Earth and Moon” by Rebecca Scherm — “Compulsively readable. . . . A House Between the Earth and the Moon is a thought-provoking and absorbing read. By deftly combining the subjects of big tech and climate change, Scherm has created a world that fully embodies the anxiety and indignity of our times.” —Sandra Newman, The New York Times Book Review

“A Reason for Hope” by Kristin Von Kreisler — “After a distressing date with a respected member of the community, a bookmobile librarian on an island in Puget Sound decides to press charges and is comforted by a courthouse dog trained to help victims through the difficult judicial process.” — Atlas Publishing

“A Safe House” by Stuart Wood — “Stone Barrington is looking forward to some quiet time in New York City, until he is asked to transport precious, top-secret cargo across the Atlantic. Taking on the challenge, Stone flies off unaware of what-or who-he is bringing with him. But his plans to lie low are quickly spoiled when a dangerous dispatcher tracks down Stone and his tantalizing mystery guest, intent on payback-and silencing anyone who poses a threat. From the English countryside to the balmy beaches of Key West, Stone is on an international mission to hide and protect those closest to him”– Baker & Taylor

Disappearing Earth” by Julia Phillips — “Accomplished and gripping. . . . Phillips’ spellbinding prose is saturated with sensuous nuance and emotional intensity, as she subtly traces the shadows of Russia’s past and illuminates today’s daunting complexities of gender and identity, expectations and longing.” Booklist (starred review)

Fire & Blood” by George R. R. Martin — “Martin has done it again. . . . [Fire & Blood is] a beautiful weaving of the wars, marriages, deaths, dragons, and politics that shape the world Martin has created, leaving the reader feeling like this is a true history rather than a piece of fantasy. This is a masterpiece of world-building. . . . Beyond Martin’s legions of fans, anyone with a taste for richly, even obsessively detailed historical fiction or fantasy about royalty will enjoy this extraordinary work.”Booklist (starred review)

“French Braid” by Anne Tyler — “The wonder of French Braid is the easygoing fluidity with which Tyler jumps and floats between characters and decades to create what in the end is a deftly crafted family portrait that spans some 70 years . . . We read in fascination.” Christian Science Monitor

“High Stakes” by Danielle Steel — “Five women work together at a boutique literary and talent agency while the challenges of their individual lives causes chaos both inside and outside the office.” — Baker & Taylor

“House of Sky and Breath” by Sarah J. Maas — “After saving Crescent City, Bryce, Hunt and their friends get pulled into the rebels’ plans to chip away at the Asteri’s power, in the second novel of the series following House of Earth and Blood” — Baker & Taylor

Ocean State” by Stewart O’Nan — “[A] beautifully rendered and heartbreaking story…This isn’t a crime novel; it’s a Shakespearean tragedy told in spare, poetic, insightful prose.”—Publishers Weekly, starred review

“One Italian Summer” by Rebecca Serle — “An unconventional love story that embraces people’s flaws and selfishness as part of what makes them human.” —Kirkus

“Run Rose Run” by Dolly Parton and James Patterson — “On the rise and on the run, a young singer-songwriter arrives in Nashville to claim her destiny, but it’s also where the darkness she’s fled might find her–and destroy her.” — Baker & Taylor

Slough House” by Mick Herron — “Herron’s excellent series featuring a motley crew of sidelined MI5 agents united under the fearless leadership of the unforgettable Jackson Lamb, has grown ever-more reflective — if not downright prescient — of contemporary political machinations, and is all the richer for it.” —The Boston Globe

“Thank You, Mr. Nixon: Stories” by Gish Jen — “Stunning . . . Hilarious [and] heartbreaking . . . A fresh take on the experience of immigration and exile . . . Political and economic relations between China and the United States are major news, but Jen takes it to the micro level in her vibrant short stories about characters who are varying degrees of Chinese and American . . . Recurring and related characters link all of the stories, which are set across several decades. Jen’s crisp prose, wonderful eye for detail, and wry humor make them a joy to read, and there is wisdom here, too.” Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“The Berlin Exchange” by Joseph Kanon — “[A] riveting tale of a spy forced to go back into the cold as a way of reclaiming his life. . . . Genuine suspense, including an exciting variation on the border-crossing theme, combine beautifully with moving psychological drama.” Booklist (starred review)

“The Diamond Eye” by Kate Quinn — “The Diamond Eye is another winner from Kate Quinn. A historian-turned-sniper who falls in love in wartorn Russia and then befriends Eleanor Roosevelt – what’s not to love? The thrilling showdown at the end is not to be missed!” —  Kaia Alderson, author of Sisters in Arms

“The Fortnight in September” by R. C. Sherriff — “Extraordinary. . . . The pages are full of anticipation. . . . [T]here’s a sense that time is ticking on these vacations. It must be savored, and so, too, should this very special book.” Booklist Reviews (starred)

“The Last Garden in England” by Julia Kelly — “Three women across time are connected by a garden in Kelly’s enjoyable and richly detailed latest…Kelly balances Emma’s detective work reviewing papers and records found in the house with Venetia’s slow-burn tragedy and the twist that defines Beth’s relationship to the gardens. Kelly easily delivers everything her fans will expect.”Publishers Weekly

The Library of Lost and Found” by Phaedra Patrick — “A heartwarming and tender tale of growth and redemption…. Curl up by the fire with a cup of tea and a biscuit and be entranced by this delightful story.” —Library Journal, starred review

“The Love of My Life” by Rosie Walsh — “Walsh masterfully shows both [protagonists’] points of view while maintaining an intoxicating air of mystery…a propulsive thriller with heart that will keep readers guessing.”
Kirkus, starred review

The Sanatorium” by Sarah Pearse –“Pearse not only creates believably fallible characters, she also vividly portrays the frigid landscape of Le Sommet buffeted by blizzards, and a chilling epilogue cries out for a sequel. Crime-fiction readers will want to keep an eye on Pearse.” Booklist (starred review)

“What Happened to the Bennetts” by Lisa Scottoline — “Just might be the best book Scottoline has ever written, a masterpiece of misdirection, where nothing is as it seems, and a scorching character study of a man at the end of his rope who’s not about to go down without a fight.”
—Providence Journal

ADULT MYSTERY

“A Sunlit Weapon” by Jacqueline Winspear — “In the latest installment of the New York Times bestselling series, a series of possible attacks on British pilots leads Jacqueline Winspear’s beloved heroine Maisie Dobbs into a mystery involving First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt.” — Amazon.com

“Find Me” by Alafair Burke — “The two women feverishly piece together the disparate parts of the story, and Burke’s masterful control over pacing and plot reveals will make readers just as anxious to uncover the truth.” — BookPage

“Give Unto Others” by Donna Leon — “Once again, Brunetti’s remarkable empathy with people takes him into shark-infested waters, forced to confront how ‘revenge, that deformed child of justice, fed itself with blind desire.’ Another moving meditation on the vagaries of human relationships posing as a mystery novel. There is no ambiguity about the unalloyed affection millions of readers feel toward Guido Brunetti, one of crime fiction’s most popular protagonists.” —Booklist (starred review)

“The Match” by Harlan Coben — “The topical follow-up to Coben’s best-selling The Boy from the Woods addresses reality shows, DNA searches, cyberbullying, and social media influencers in a suspenseful novel guaranteed to be a hit.”―Library Journal (Starred Review)

ADULT NON-FICTION

“50 States, 500 Campgrounds: Where to Go, When to Go, What to See, What to Do” by Joe Yogerst — “An illustrated guide to 500 of the best campgrounds across North America offers the top places to pitch a tent, rent a cabin, or bring your RV with information on location, open seasons, amenities, local activities and attractions.” — Atlas Publishing

“Dark and Magical Places: The Neuroscience of Navigation” by Christopher Kemp — “Kemp debunks numerous myths, including the idea that females possess poorer navigational skills than males, and reflects on the difference between the navigational abilities of modern humans versus those of Neanderthals. What separates the two, he suggests, is the use of the subjunctive form, which led to humans being better at navigating. Kemp peppers in accounts of his own poor navigational abilities and colorful stories of people getting lost, which keep things moving along. The result is both enjoyable and accessible.”― Publishers Weekly

How Civil Wars Start: And How to Stop Them” by Barbara F. Walter — “How Civil Wars Start is a stop sign for us—and an imperative book for our time. The evidence-based preventative measures could not be more urgent. Read and act.”—Ibram X. Kendi, author of How to Be an Antiracist

“Learning to Walk in the Dark” by Barbara Brown Taylor — “An elegant writer with the common touch, Taylor is always a wonderful guide to the spiritual world, and this book is no exception. Here she encourages us to turn out the lights and embrace the spiritual darkness, for it is in the dark, she maintains, that one can truly see.” — Booklist

“Powder Days: Ski Bums, Ski Towns and the Future of Chasing Snow” by Heather Hansman — ” “Powder Days is a bittersweet love letter to skiing, mountain towns, and the people that make them work. As the climate warms and the income gap widens, Heather Hansman is clear-eyed about the challenges and flaws of the ski industry. But she never loses sight of the magic.”—Eva Holland, author of Nerve: Adventures in the Science of Fear 

“Stolen Focus: Why You Can’t Pay Attention and How to Think Deeply Again” by Johann Hari — “In his unique voice, Johann Hari tackles the profound dangers facing humanity from information technology and rings the alarm bell for what all of us must do to protect ourselves, our children, and our democracies.”—Hillary Clinton

“The Naked Don’t Fear Water: An Underground Journey with Afghan Refugees” by Matthieu Aikins — “Riveting…The book shines a humane spotlight on many of the people the author met along the way as well as on the role chance played in their fates, with particularly moving chapters on life within the Greek refugee camp. The narrative is scrupulous and often suspenseful.”  — Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

VERMONT NON-FICTION

“Vermont History: Volume 90, No. 1: Winter Spring 2022”

ADULT AUDIO BOOK

“Never” by Ken Follett — “Never is an extraordinary novel, full of heroines and villains, false prophets and elite warriors, jaded politicians and opportunistic revolutionaries. It brims with cautionary wisdom for our times, and delivers a visceral, heart-pounding story that transports listeners to the brink of the unimaginable.” — Amazon.com

BLUE/DVD MOVIES

“All Creatures Great & Small: Season 1”
“Austin Powers in Goldmember”
“Belfast”
“The Matrix Resurrections”
“West Side Story”

JUVENILE MOVIES

“Clifford the Big Red Dog”
“Sing 2”

YOUNG ADULT NON-FICTION

“Standing in This Place: Growing up LGBTQ in Vermont” by Maura Campbell — “An original play by Maura Campbell, based on the lives of real people. This play was commissioned by Vermont Pride Theater at Chandler, for its ninth annual Summer Pride Festival. Its premiere performances took place at Chandler on July 26 and August 3, 2019. The script was based on interviews…. (from verso)” — Photographs ©2021m Ramsey Papp, GoodReads.com

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – FEBRUARY 2022

ADULT FICTION

“Christmas at the Restaurant” by Pamela Kelley — “Nantucket’s famous Christmas Stroll is always the first weekend of December and this year sisters Mandy and Emma, and Paul, the executive chef, want to do something extra special for Mimi’s Place, the restaurant they co-own. It will be Emma and Paul’s first Christmas together as a couple and Mandy’s first holiday as a newly single and divorced mother of two. Although Mandy does have a promising new relationship, she wants to take things very slow. Their sister Jill and her new husband, Billy, are planning to spend the whole month of December on Nantucket too, juggling working remotely for the executive search firm they own together in Manhattan and relaxing and spending time with family and helping out at the restaurant too. And Gina, one of their best servers and bartender, is spending her first winter on Nantucket and it’s a bit of an adjustment. Winters on Nantucket are so much quieter than the city life she was used to. She’s even more confused when someone she had a major crush on back in the city moves to Nantucket. Suddenly her boring winter is starting to look a lot more interesting.” — Amazon.com

“Fifty Words for Rain” by Asha Lemmie — Daughter of a married Japanese aristocrat and her African American GI lover, Nori struggles to seek acceptance in post-World War II Japan, even as she is hidden away in the attic of her grandparents’ imperial estate and forced to take chemical baths to lighten her skin. The arrival of her half-brother provides her with an unexpected ally. In-house excitement over this debut.” — LIBRARY JOURNAL, c2020.

“Mistress of the Ritz” by Melanie Benjamin — “This impeccably researched, lyrically told historical about a brash American woman and her French husband during WWII is a remarkable achievement. . . . Benjamin skillfully weaves in a host of historical figures—including Coco Chanel, alleged to be a Nazi sympathizer, and Ernest Hemingway—whose vibrant presences make Benjamin’s protagonists and engaging group of supporting characters shine all the more. Even readers who aren’t big fans of historical fiction might be swayed by this outstanding tale.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“The Hotel” by Pamela Kelley — “The Whitley was Nantucket’s most exclusive hotel. …If you worked in the hospitality industry, landing a job at The Whitley was the ultimate goal. Many of the staff had lived and worked there for years. There were strict rules about the staff keeping their distance from both the guests and the family. But sometimes, rules were broken. No one is more surprised than Paula Whitley when her grandfather, Wynn Whitley, the founder of the hotel and many other business holdings, makes two big announcements. He is promoting Paula from her quiet behind the scenes role handling the accounting, to being in charge of everything. The rest of the family, siblings, cousins, aunts, uncles and parents, are stunned and not everyone is happy about it. And the second big announcement–she’s expected to work closely with a newly-hired consultant, a turnaround expert in luxury hotels. Paula dislikes David Connolly immediately. He’s arrogant and bossy and annoyingly right most of the time. She’d be loving her new role, if it wasn’t for him. And everyone, family and staff are wondering–what is grandfather’s goal? Is he looking to sell The Whitley?” — Baker & Taylor

“The Maid” by Nita Prose — “Prose threads a steady needle with the intricate plotting, the locked-room elements of the mystery, and especially Molly’s character. . . . The reader comes to understand Molly’s worldview, and to sympathize with her longing to be accepted—a quest that gives The Maid real emotional heft.”—The New York Times Book Review

The Restaurant” by Pamela Kelley — “Three sisters. An inherited Nantucket restaurant. One year before they can sell.Mandy, Emma and Jill are as close as three sisters who live hundreds of miles apart can be…. When their beloved grandmother, Rose Ferguson passes peacefully in her sleep a week before her ninety-ninth birthday she leaves them quite a surprise. In addition to her Nantucket home, they learned that she was the silent owner of Mimi’s Place, one of Nantucket’s most popular year-round restaurants. There is of course, a catch–she left the restaurant equally to Mandy, Emma, and Jill–and also to Paul, the chef for the past twelve years.And before they can sell, all three girls need to work at the restaurant for a period of one year–or else their shares will go to Paul–who was also Emma’s first love. Three sisters inherit a Nantucket restaurant and must work together for a year–or lose their shares to the chef. Paul was Emma’s first love, and now he’s their business partner.” — Amazon.com

“The Trees” by Percival Everett — “Everett has mastered the movement between unspeakable terror and knockout comedy.” ―The New York Times Book Review

“The Violin Conspiracy” by Brendan Slocumb — “[A] gripping debut. . . . Slocumb sensitively portrays Ray’s resilience in the face of extreme racism. The author is off to a promising start.” — Publishers Weekly

“To Paradise” by Hanya Yanagihara — “We are given a patriarch, wealth, children; there is an arranged marriage, an inheritance, a true love, a class divide and a significant twist. Deftly paced and judiciously detailed, the tale makes hay with the conventions of the 19th-century novel. But that’s not all. With breathtaking audacity Yanagihara rewrites America….Yanagihara masterfully repurposes themes, situations and motifs…This ambitious novel tackles major American questions and answers them in an original, engrossing way. It has a major feel. But it is finally in [its] minor moments that Yanagihara shows greatness.” – Gish Jen, The New York Times Book Review(cover review)

“Violeta” by Isabel Allende — “Another gift of epic storytelling . . . A Long Petal of the Sea is a love story for these times.” —NPR

ADULT NON-FICTION

“Bee People and the Bugs They Love” by Frank Mortimer — “…it is an achievement to convey so much knowledge so accessibly without once seeming overbearing. The main reason it all works is the honest descriptions of friendships that spring up around a shared, all-absorbing interest in bees.  And Mortimer intersperses useful facts about his passion in a successful and funny book that is sure to swell the ranks of the world’s beekeepers.” –New York Times

“Greek Myths: A New Retelling” by Charlotte Higgins — “Chief culture writer at the Guardian and winner of the Classical Association Prize, Higgins takes a fresh look at Greek myths, retold throughout the millennia given their unerring understanding of the human condition. Higgins works from the perspective of women, from goddesses to witches to wives, mothers, and daughters, as if they were weaving these stories together into one grand tapestry. Illustrator Ofili has exhibited at the Tate Britain and New York’s New Museum. Big in-house love.” — Barbara Hoffert. LIBRARY JOURNAL, c2021.

“The Monastic Heart: 50 Simple Practices for a Contemplative and Fulfilling Life” by Joan Chittister — “[An] impeccable guide . . . Filled with many suggestions for ways to forge greater connections with one’s community and God’s will, Chittister’s program will serve as a powerful corrective to those looking to slow down.” —Publishers Weekly

“Unsettling Truths: The Ongoing, Dehumanizing Legacy of the Doctrine of Discovery” by Mark Charles — “This sobering critique presents a disturbing yet welcome analysis of how the Doctrine of Discovery has split American church and society along racial lines, and makes a powerful argument for engaging in national dialogue around issues of class, gender, and race.” — Publishers Weekly, October 14, 2019

“Woke Racism: How a New Religion Has Betrayed Black America” by John McWhorter — “Honest commentary about racial controversies is rare, and John McWhorter is a writer who can be counted on to provide it. Woke Racism is a heartfelt evisceration of the sloppy thinking that forms the foundation of so much social justice activism today. It’s an essential contribution to our national discussion about racial inequality, and McWhorter’s willingness to put unvarnished truth above politically correct niceties deserves our gratitude.”—Jason L. Riley, Wall Street Journal columnist and author of “Maverick”

JUVENILE FICTION

“Bird” by Zetta Elliott — “Bird, an artistic young African-American boy, expresses himself through drawing as he struggles to understand his older brother’s drug addiction and death, while a family friend, Uncle Son, provides guidance and understanding.” — Atlas Publishing

JUVENILE MOVIES

“Encanto”

Categories
Highlighted New Arrivals

Woke Racism: How a New Religion Has Betrayed Black America by John McWhorter

“Honest commentary about racial controversies is rare, and John McWhorter is a writer who can be counted on to provide it. Woke Racism is a heartfelt evisceration of the sloppy thinking that forms the foundation of so much social justice activism today. It’s an essential contribution to our national discussion about racial inequality, and McWhorter’s willingness to put unvarnished truth above politically correct niceties deserves our gratitude.”—Jason L. Riley, Wall Street Journal columnist and author of “Maverick”

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Highlighted New Arrivals

The 1619 Project by Nikole Hannah-Jones

“The 1619 Project” by Nikole Hannah-Jones — “This ongoing initiative from The New York Times Magazine that began on the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery reimagines if our national narrative actually started in late August of 1619, when a ship arrived in Jamestown bearing a cargo of 20-30 enslaved people from Africa.” — Atlas Publishing