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Highlighted New Arrivals

New Cold Wars: China’s Rise, Russia’s Invasion, and American Struggle to Defend the West by David E. Sanger

“New Cold Wars: China’s Rise, Russia’s Invasion, and America’s Struggle to Defend the West” by David E. Sanger — “[A] cogent, revealing account of how a generation of American officials have grappled with dangerous developments in the post-Cold War era—the rise of an enduringly authoritarian China, the return of state-on-state conflict in Europe—that have produced a geopolitical mash-up of old and new . . . compelling . . . vividly captures Washington.”—The New York Times

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NEW ARRIVALS – APRIL 2024

ADULT FICTION

“After Annie” by Anna Quindlen — “A master of exploring human frailty and resilience in the face of domestic tragedy, best-selling Anna Quindlen plumbs the depths of Annie’s survivors’ individual and collective grief in scenes that are both subtle and sharp. Exquisite in its sensitivity, breathtaking in its compassion, Quindlen’s exploration of loss and renewal will provoke both weeping and wonder.”—Booklist (starred review)

“All We Were Promised” by Ashton Lattimore — “Against the backdrop of untold history, Ashton Lattimore spins a beguiling story of friendship, deception, and women crossing boundaries in the name of freedom. Disparate and deeply real, Charlotte, Nell, and Evie struggle to fully trust one another, but ultimately discover that together they may be stronger than everything their turbulent world casts against them.”—Lisa Wingate, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Book of Lost Friends

“Crook Manifesto” by Colson Whitehead — “Whitehead’s flair for texture is as sharp as ever…Ray, May, Elizabeth and Pepper in particular are by turns exasperating and aspirational. Life gets thrown at them, and they throw themselves back in return. These are people you crave to catch up with, and in Whitehead’s hands, the vast and intangible forces of society, injustice, morality, survival and love are distilled in them.” —NPR

“Hidden Pictures” by Jason Rekulak — “I read Hidden Pictures and loved it. The language is straightforward, the surprises really surprise, and it has that hard-to-achieve propulsiveness that won’t let you put it down. And the pictures are terrific!” ―Stephen King

“How to End a Love Story” by Yulin Kuang — “Screenwriter Kuang’s debut beautifully probes the lingering effects of grief and guilt while offering readers a glimpse behind the curtain of Hollywood glamour. … Kuang handles her characters’ complex emotions with sensitivity and skill, and makes the chemistry between Helen and Grant leap off the page. Readers will have no trouble rooting for these two.” — Publishers Weekly

“Lucky” by Jane Smiley — “Spellbinding . . . Smiley neatly reverses the usual story of a 1970s singer [and then] orchestrates a seismic twist of staggering magnitude . . . Every novel by Smiley is a surprise. ” —Donna Seaman, Booklist (starred)

“Mal Goes to War” by Edward Ashton — “Ashton’s vision of the future feels all too plausible and his blend of action and humor keeps the pages flying. This is sure to please the author’s fans.” ―Publishers Weekly

“The Berlin Letters” by Katherine Reay — “From the time she was a young girl, Luisa Voekler has loved solving puzzles and cracking codes. Brilliant and logical, she’s expected to quickly climb the career ladder at the CIA. But while her coworkers have moved on to thrilling Cold War assignments ― especially in the exhilarating era of the late 1980s ― Luisa’s work remains stuck in the past decoding messages from World War II.…” — Amazon.com

“The Little Liar” by Match Albom — “Beloved bestselling author Mitch Albom returns with a powerful novel of hope and forgiveness that moves from a coastal Greek city during WWII to America in the golden age of Hollywood, as the intertwined lives of three young survivors are forever changed by the perils of deception and the grace of redemption.” — Harper Collins

“The Limits” by Nell Freudenberger — “Freudenberger ably captures the sense of uncertainty and displacement during the height of the pandemic, matching the inner confusion of major life changes with the outer turmoil of a world in crisis.” –The Washington Post

“The Morningside” by Tea Obreht — “Obreht is offering a cautionary vision of what our future might look like, but she’s also asking questions that are as old as storytelling. What do we want to tell ourselves about ourselves? What do we try to hide from ourselves? And what’s the cost of our lives?”—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“Utopia Avenue” by David Mitchell — “Mitchell, whose novels range through different modes and genres with extraordinary facility, has a lucid, kinetic style at all times, but he is never more impressive than when writing in close third person about characters in altered mental states—captivity, physical pain, madness. . . . A conventional story of a band’s rise turns into a book on another plane entirely.”—The New Yorker

ADULT MYSTERY

“An Irish Hostage” by Charles Todd — “[Readers] are bound to be caught up in the adventures of Bess Crawford . . . While her sensibility is as crisp as her narrative voice, Bess is a compassionate nurse who responds with feeling.” — The New York Times Book Review

“Death in the Details” by Katie Tietjen — “Aesthetically and morally complex . . . A compelling account of how the toll of war extends far beyond the battlefield.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Pay Dirt” by Sara Paretsky — “History buffs will appreciate Paretsky’s exploration of Kansas’s violent past, while V.I. fans will be eager to read the latest in the award-winning series (after Overboard).” — Library Journal

“The Mystery Guest” by Nita Prose — “Heartwarming . . . Like Agatha Christie’s Miss Marple, who’s rendered invisible because she’s an old woman, Molly and her grandmother are not seen because of the kind of work they do. In this affecting and socially-pointed mystery series, however, invisibility becomes the superpower of the pink-collar proletariat.”—NPR

“Three-Inch Teeth” by C. J. Box — “Box’s pulse-pounding latest adventure for Wyoming game warden Pickett showcases the series’ strengths: high-octane action, intricate plotting, and well-drawn characters… [and] maintains expert suspense throughout, shrewdly exploiting the story’s animal and human killers to set a series of diabolical traps for his hero. It’s another high point in a series full of them.” — Publishers Weekly

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“Somehow: Thoughts on Love” by Anne Lamott — “Beloved and best-selling author Lamott offers a joyful, feel-good read that explores the power of love—romantic, platonic, and familial—in people’s lives, with her usual grace, humor, and insight.”—Library Journal

ADULT NON-FICTION

“A Wing and a Prayer: The Race to Save our Vanishing Birds” by Anders & Beverly Gyllenhall — “Written partially as a travelogue as the authors journeyed thousands of miles by road around the continent, the combination of personal story and scientific reportage is compelling… show[s] how new technologies of radar and radio tracking allow intimate looks at birds’ lives, and otherwise delve into the commitment and love that is demonstrated by all the disparate groups working to save the continent’s birds.” – Booklist (starred review)

“Alien Earths: The New Science of Planet Hunting in the Cosmos” by Lisa Kaltenegger — “Exquisite book is for all who have peered into the night sky pondering the mysteries of the universe … a mind-bending journey.”
Booklist (starred)”

“Glucose Goddess Method: A 4-Week Guide to Cutting Cravings, Getting Your Energy Back, and Feeling Amazing” by Jessie Inchauspe — “Blood sugar takes center stage in biochemist Inchauspé’s clever guide to eating for ‘more energy, curbed cravings, [and] better mood’…This intelligent survey offers plenty to savor.” —PUBLISHERS WEEKLY

“How We Live is How We Die” by Pema Chodron — “Chödrön’s clarity and warmth make this book accessible to a wide array of audiences. . . . Oft-quoted, much beloved, and radiating kindness, Chödrön remains a guiding light for those seeking spiritual growth.”—Library Journal

“Normal Broke: The Grief Companion for When It’s Time to Heal but You’re not Sure You Want to” by Kelly Cervantes — “Normal Broken was born out of a desire to meet people where they are in their grief journeys, to lend a hand, or maybe to just sit in the dark with them. To acknowledge your brokenness and to feel broken together–never pressured to “move on” or “think positive” — Baker & Taylor

“Snacking Bakes: Simple Recipes for Cookies, Bars, Brownies, Cakes & More” by Yossi Arefi — “Yossy knows something fundamental about all of us. When we want something sweet, we want it now. Her treats deliver. No fuss, just easy, accessible, truly inspired deliciousness. Snacking Cakes is well-worn, batter-spattered, and beloved. Our copy of Snacking Bakes is sure to be a mess in no time.”—Samantha Seneviratne, author of Bake Smart

“Work, Retire, Repeat: The Uncertainty of Retirement in the New Economy” by Teresa Ghilarducci — “Ghilarducci argues convincingly that how long people need to work is more about who has power in society than anything else.” — Peter Coy ― The New York Times

JUVENILE FICTION

“Hotel Flamingo” by Alex Milway

Categories
Highlighted New Arrivals

Loon Lessons: Uncommon Encounters with the Great Northern Diver

James D. Paruk

“James D. Paruk has written a wonderful, personal account of loon biology. He recounts thirty years of adventures with loons, summarizing what we know about them in the context of loons’ basic biology and behavior. Highly readable and informal, this book is for anyone who wants to learn more about loons.”—Charles Walcott, former director, Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology

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NEW ARRIVALS – FEBRUARY 2024

ADULT FICTION

“Forever Home” by Graham Norton — “Wonderful. . . . Dark, funny, full of emotional intelligence and gripping from the start . . . beautifully written.” — Daily Mail

“Fourth Wing” by Rebecca Yarros — “Dragons and war, passion and power…Fourth Wing is dazzling. Rebecca Yarros has created a world as compelling as it is deadly, and I can’t wait to see where she takes it next.” ―Nalini Singh, New York Times bestselling author

“The Fox Wife” by Yangze Choo — “Equal parts detective story, folktale, and family saga, the highly anticipated latest novel by Choo (The Night Tiger, 2019) will appeal to fans of diverse, imaginative literary fiction, historical mysteries like Nilima Rao’s A Disappearance in Fiji (2023), and fantasy like Marlon James’ Dark Star trilogy.” Booklist (starred review)

“The Phoenix Crown” by Kate Quinn — “From bestselling authors Janie Chang and Kate Quinn, a thrilling and unforgettable narrative about the intertwined lives of two wronged women, spanning from the chaos of the San Francisco earthquake to the glittering palaces of Versailles”– Baker & Taylor

“The Women” by Kristin Hannah — “a moving, gripping tale that pays tribute to the under-appreciated skill and courage of combat nurses.” –Booklist, starred review

“The Wandering Stars” by Tommy Orange — “An eloquent indictment of the devastating long-term effects of the massacre, dislocation and forced assimilation of Native Americans, [Wandering Stars] is also a heartfelt paean to the importance of family and of ancestors’ stories in recovering a sense of belonging and identity . . . Wandering Stars more than fulfills the promise of There There.” —NPR

ADULT MYSTERY

“Missing Persons” by James Patterson — “When a desperate businessman asks him to find his daughter and grandchildren who have disappeared without a trace, Jack Morgan, the head of Private, finds this simple missing persons case turning into something much more deadly, forcing him to face the trauma of his past to save a family’s future.” — Baker & Taylor

“The Edge” by David Baldacci — “A complex, high-powered thriller that will keep the reader guessing . . . This is a winner from a pro.”―Kirkus

“The Ink Black Heart” by Robert Galbraith — “The sixth and most complex novel yet in a unique series. . .  The author does a masterly job of keeping all plot elements in play and in balance, and the complications only add to the satisfaction of the mystery’s eventual solution.”―Tom NolanThe Wall Street Journal

ADULT NON-FICTION

Great Scoops: Recipes from a Neighborhood Ice Cream Shop” by Marlene Haley & Amelia Ryan —  “Great Scoops is a captivating cookbook about artisanal ice cream, the people who craft it and the community that loves them for it. The delightful selection of classic and whimsical flavors reminds us that delicious homemade ice creams can be made year-round and, more importantly, that you’re never too old (and it’s never too cold) to enjoy a heartfelt scoop.” — Amazon.com

“Loon Lessons: Uncommon Encounters with the Great Northern Diver” by James D. Paruk — “James D. Paruk has written a wonderful, personal account of loon biology. He recounts thirty years of adventures with loons, summarizing what we know about them in the context of loons’ basic biology and behavior. Highly readable and informal, this book is for anyone who wants to learn more about loons.”—Charles Walcott, former director, Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology

BLUE/DVD MOVIES

“Guillermo del Toro’s Pinocchio”
“What Happens Later”

PICTURE BOOK

“Big” by Vashti Harrison
“Bubbie & Rivka’s Best-Ever Challah (So Far)” by Sarah Lynne Reul
“Hornbeam All In” by Cynthia Rylant
“Palace of Books” by Patricia Polacco
“Stargazer and the Solar Eclipse” by Tom Campbell
“The North Wind and the Sun” by Philip Stead
“Vamos! Let’s Go Read” by Raul the Third

CHILDREN’S KIT

“Emotions”
“Volcanoes”

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Big Nate Nailed It!” by Lincoln Pierce — “Big Nate is a legend at P.S. 38, where he and friends Francis, Teddy, Dee Dee, Chad, and others manage to make sixth grade interesting with all kinds of pranks, drama, sports, and good times. The all-time leader in detentions, Nate is never far from the spotlight, whether it’s for a freak injury on the soccer field, Halloween costume fail, or stirring up a new episode in his long-running rivalry with grade-grubbing Gina or his teacher nemesis, Mrs. Godfrey.” — Publisher’s Annotation

“Things in the Basement” by Ben Hatke — “Tasked by his preoccupied mother with finding one of his infant twin sisters’ socks in the family’s basement laundry room, a young boy descends into entire worlds in Hatke’s haunted, wondrous museum of a graphic novel.” ―The New York Times, from “The Best Children’s Books of 2023”

“Waverider” by Kazu Kibuishi — “This electrifying conclusion to the #1 New York Times best-selling series follows Emily as she travels to Typhon to confront the fraud who has seized power in the absence of a king and must rely on new friends and old enemies to survive the threat of darkness.” — Atlas Publishing

Categories
Highlighted New Arrivals

The War of Words: How America’s GI Journalists Battled Courtship and Propaganda to Help Win World War II

Molly Guptill Manning

“As the daughter of an American who served in World War II, I was eager to read The War of Words: How America’s GI Journalists Battled Censorship and Propaganda to Help Win World War II. I was not disappointed. The War of Words is a salute to the American spirit and a tribute to the importance of freedom of the press. It is a fascinating and significant contribution to our collective knowledge and understanding of World War II.” —Amy Hill Hearth, New York Times bestselling author of Having Our Say

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NEW ARRIVALS -JANUARY 2024

ADULT FICTION

“Emily Wilde’s Map of the Otherlands” by Heather Fawcett — “Like all good fairy tales, this book is enchantingly charming, with hints of razor-sharp teeth. My only complaint is that it ends; I want to live in Emily’s Otherlands forever.”—Kiersten White, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Mister Magic

“Family Family” by Laurie Frankel — “Frankel has written a funny, heart-wrenching, deeply personal story about the meaning of family and holding fast to one’s beliefs. India is the star of Frankel’s novel, but the supporting characters are warm and vibrant, each getting their own opportunity to shine. Highly recommended for fans of Frankel and those who enjoy literary fiction featuring witty dialogue and thought-provoking topics.”
Library Journal (starred)

“House of Flame and Shadow” by Sarah J. Maas — “Stranded in a strange new world, Bryce Quinlan must rely on all her wits to get back to her family and friends in Midgard, in the third novel of the series following House of Sky and Breath.” — Atlas Publishing

“Iron Flame” by Rebecca Yarros — “After surviving her first year at Basgiath War College, dragon rider Violet Sorrengail discovers that the real danger is just beginning.” — Baker & Taylor

“The Berry Pickers” by Amanda Peters — “The strength of Amanda Peters’s novel lies in its understanding of how trauma spreads through a life and a family, and its depiction of the challenges facing Indigenous people . . . [A] powerful message about truth, forgiveness and healing.” —Marion Winik, The Washington Post

ADULT MYSTERY

“Holmes, Marple & Poe” by James Patterson & Brian Sitts — “Brendan Holmes, Margaret Marple and Auguste Poe open a private investigating company together and their daring methodology and news-making solved cases would make their last-namesakes proud and attract the attention of an NYPD detective.” — Baker & Taylor

“Hero” by Thomas Perry — “So suspenseful it should be required reading for thrill seekers … A tour de force.” ― Booklist STARRED REVIEW

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“The Undying: Pain Vulnerability, Mortality, Medicine, Art, Time, Dreams, Data, Exhaustion Cancer and Cure” by Anne Boyer — “At the time of her diagnosis with an aggressive form of breast cancer, the poet Anne Boyer was 41 and a single parent. In her genre-defying memoir, Ms. Boyer, now 46, chronicles her struggle to survive not just the disease, but a brutal chemotherapy regime.” ―The New York Times

ADULT NON-FICTION

“Fodor’s Essential Scotland” — “Fodor’s is pitched a few notches higher….aimed at a fairly discerning traveler with an appetite for background and the occasional surprise.” – New York Times

“Postcards for Mia” by Michael Taussig — “A full moon after a wasp attack, poppies from a train, panning for gold in the River Cesecito, a bountiful pumpkin harvest . . . . Postcards for Mia is a joyful collection of hand-drawn and -painted postcards sent by anthropologist Michael Taussig to his granddaughter, Mia. From airports in New York to cemeteries in Colombia, confrontations with wild boars to conversations with well-dressed koalas, Postcards for Mia is a picture book to be shared and savored by both children and adults, a journey into a wondrous world colored by the stories we might choose to tell about it.” — Random House

“Scotland” by Susanne Arbuckle — Lonely Planet’s “Experience Scotland” travel guide reveals exciting new ways to explore this iconic destination with one-of-a-kind adventures at every turn. Visit the infamous Malt Whisky Trail, devour fresh lobster platters in Oban, escape to white sand beaches in Harris – using our local experts and planning tools to create your own unique trip. — Baker & Taylor

“The Wall Between: What Jews and Palestinians Don’t Want to Know about Each Other” by Raja G. Khouri & Jeffrey J. Wilkinson — “That this book even exists is remarkable. It’s extraordinarily difficult for a Palestinian and a Jew to write a book that fairly conveys the dominant mood in both communities about Palestine-Israel. But this book not only exists—it’s wise, engaging and deeply humane. It will prove an essential text in bringing diaspora Jews and Palestinians together in the justice movement that this moment demands.” — Peter Beinart, author of The Crisis of Zionism

“The War of Words: How America’s GI Journalists Battled Courtship and Propaganda to Help Win World War II” by Molly Guptill Manning — “As the daughter of an American who served in World War II, I was eager to read The War of Words: How America’s GI Journalists Battled Censorship and Propaganda to Help Win World War II. I was not disappointed. The War of Words is a salute to the American spirit and a tribute to the importance of freedom of the press. It is a fascinating and significant contribution to our collective knowledge and understanding of World War II.” —Amy Hill Hearth, New York Times bestselling author of Having Our Say

PICTURE BOOKS

“A Few Beautiful Minutes: Experiencing a Solar Eclipse” by Kate Allen Fox
“Ethan and the Strays” by John Sullivan

CHILDREN’S KIT

“STEM Kit: Earthquakes”
“STEM Kit: Gravity”
“STEM Kit: Light”
“STEM Kit: Rocks and Minerals”
“STEM Kit: Space”
“STEM Kit: Time”

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Athena and the Lost Magic” by David Chittock — “Athena always knew she was smart and special, but she didn’t realize that she was a goddess! When she’s whisked away to Mount Olympus Academy, she worries about fitting in and dealing with her dad, Zeus. Luckily, she meets the Goddess Girls and finds the best friends she’s ever had.” — Publisher Annotation:

“Enlighten Me” by Minh Le — “By visualizing these stories as games, Bình learns how to rely on his intellect, family, and community to navigate everyday challenges.”―Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Four Eyes” by Rex Ogle & Dave Valeza — “Readers will deeply care for Rex’s journey toward self-acceptance, his familial relationships, and his navigation of a new school environment. The bright, clean art emphasizes the emotional highs and lows… A realistic, funny, and heartfelt framing of the hardships of middle school and fitting in.” — Kirkus Reviews

Mapmakers and the Lost Magic” by Cameron Chittock — “A quaint tale of courage and friendship brimming with a fruitful sense of whims…. Intriguingly good.” –Kirkus Reviews

“The Bad Guys in Look Who’s Talking” by Aaron Blabey — “This book instantly joins the classic ranks of Captain Underpants and The Stinky Cheese Man. We challenge anyone to read this and keep a straight face.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“The Snowcat Prince” by Dina Norland — “fresh and innovative in its exploration of the lasting power of myth, systemic corruption, and the search for truth […] Purr-fect.” ― Kirkus, Starred Review

YOUNG ADULT NON-FICTION

“Consent: The New Rules of Sex Education: Every Teen’s Guide to Healthy Sexual Relationships” by Jennifer Lang — “Dr. Lang’s book should be required reading for teens, delivering important information about sex in a breezy, friendly, straightforward, and highly accessible way. A must-read for anyone wondering about how to navigate the world of consent in the #metoo era.”—Amy Ziering, filmmaker and producer of The Invisible War and The Hunting Ground

Categories
Highlighted New Arrivals

Prequel: An American Fight Against Facism

Rachel Maddow

“Maddow’s book is a ripping read—well rendered, fast-paced and delivered with the same punch and assurance that she brings to a broadcast. . . . Prequel is a valuable window into the authoritarian mind-set—and the process by which self-professed patriots turn against democracy . . . the parallels to the present day are strong, even startling . . .”—The New York Times

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Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – DECEMBER 2023

ADULT FICTION

“At Home on Marigold Lane” by Debbie Mason — “Returning to Highland Falls after a disastrous divorce, family and marriage therapist Brianna MacLeod is reunited with her first love who sets out to convince her that risking her heart again might give them exactly what they both need–a second chance.” — Baker & Taylor

“Chain-Gang All-Stars” by Nana Kwame Adjel-Brenyah — “Like Orwell’s 1984 and Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, Adjei-Brenyah’s book presents a dystopian vision so…illuminating that it should permanently shift our understanding of who we are and what we’re capable of doing.” —The Washington Post

“Children of Memory” by Adrian Tchaikovsky — “On Imir, Captain Holt founded a new colony on an empty world. In the process, he created hope and a new future for humanity. But generations later, his descendants are struggling to survive. … explorers from the stars had arrived in secret to help this lost outpost. Confident of their superior technology, and overseen by the all-knowing construct of Doctor Avrana Kern, they begin to study their long-lost cousins from Earth. Yet the planet hides deeper mysteries. It seems the visitors aren’t the only watchers. And when the starfarers discover the scale of their mistake, it will be far too late to escape.” — ONIX Annotations

“Emily Wilde’s Encyclopedia of Faeries” by Heather Fawcett —
“Emily herself is delightful, brilliant but flawed, and often darkly funny. Her frustration with her feckless but charming colleague Wendell Bambleby is the perfect spark, and the romance is light but hits surprisingly hard when it chooses to.”—The New York Times (Editors’ Choice)

“In Search of Lost Time: In the Shadow of Young Girls in Flower: A Graphic Novel” by Marcel Proust adapted by Stanislas Brezet and Stephane Heuet –“…the second volume portrays the narrator’s foray into adolescence, set in the opulent seaside resort of Balbec. Preserving Proust’s original dissection of the spontaneity of youth, translator Laura Marris captures the narrator’s infatuation with his playmates-his memories of their intoxicating afternoons together unfolding as if in a dream. Featuring some of Proust’s most memorable characters-from mysterious Charlus to beguiling young Albertine-this second volume becomes a necessary companion piece for any lover of modern literature.” — ONIX Annotations

“River Sing Me Home” by Eleanor Shearer — “[T]he heart of the novel lies in its celebration of motherhood and female resilience. This is a tender exploration of one woman’s courage in the face of unbelievable cruelty.”
The Observer

“Slaughter House-Five (Graphic Novel Adaption)” by Kurt Vonnegut adapted by Ryan North and Albert Monteys — “Slaughterhouse-Five, an American classic, is one of the world’s great antiwar books. Centering on the infamous World War II firebombing of Dresden, the novel is the result of what Kurt Vonnegut described as a twenty-three-year struggle to write a book about what he had witnessed as an American prisoner of war…” — Amazon.com

“System Collapse” by Martha Wells — “…ART’s crew and the humans from Preservation are worried that Murderbot is facing a System Collapse-just when they need to protect a newly colonized planet from the Barish-…” — LIBRARY JOURNAL, c2023

“The Bee Sting” by Paul Murray — “Murray’s latest is a comedy of errors, emphasis on both the comedy and the errors. The novel follows the reversal of fortunes of the Barnes family, a decline sparked by the Irish financial crash, yes, but perhaps set in motion by fateful moments in the family’s past.” ―The New York Times

“The Echo of Old Books” by Barbara David — “Rare-book dealer Ashlyn Greer’s affinity for books extends beyond the intoxicating scent of old paper, ink, and leather. She can feel the echoes of the books’ previous owners—an emotional fingerprint only she can read. When Ashlyn discovers a pair of beautifully bound volumes that appear to have never been published, her gift quickly becomes an obsession. Not only is each inscribed with a startling incrimination, but the authors, Hemi and Belle, tell conflicting sides of a tragic romance.” — Baker & Taylor

“The Fragile Thread of Power” by V. E. Schwab — “Schwab cleverly builds on her existing worlds, introducing new threats and expanding the magic system. The new characters captivate and the plot twists shock.” ―Publishers Weekly

“The Future” by Naomi Alderman — “The book’s most impressive quality is its vivid, tactile imagination of our ultra-computerized future…Alderman’s encyclopedic knowledge of everything from cryptographic history to biblical hermeneutics lends the novel a savvy, scholarly gravitas.” —New York Times Book Review

“The Reformatory” by Tananarive Due — “A gripping, page-turning novel set in Jim Crow Florida that follows Robert Stephens Jr. as he s sent to a segregated reform school that is a chamber of terrors where he sees the horrors of racism and injustice, for the living, and the dead.” — Publisher Annotation:

“The Wishing Game” by Meg Shaffer — “Shaffer blends tragedy and triumph in a whimsical and gratifying debut about what makes a family. This is wish fulfillment in the best way.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Watership Down: The Graphic Novel” by Richard Adams adapted by James Sturm and Joe Sutphin — “A beautiful and faithful graphic novel adaptation of Richard Adams’s beloved story of a group of rabbits on an epic journey in search of home.” — Random House, Inc.

“Welcome Home Stranger” by Kate Christensen — “A deeply endearing story about confronting one’s past and constructing a new future—under extreme duress . . . . Welcome Home, Stranger . . . arrives at the most lovely ending of a novel I’ve read all year.” — The Washington Post

“Yellowface” by R. F. Kuang — “After the death of her literary rival in a freak accident, author June Hayward steals her just-finished masterpiece, sending it to her agent as her own work, but as emerging evidence threatens her success, she discovers just how far she’ll go to keep what she thinks she deserves.” — Atlas Publishing

ADULT MYSTERY

“Blood Lines” by Nelson and Alex DeMille — “..Special Agent Scott Brody, a wise-cracking and irreverent investigator out of central casting, and his partner, the milder Maggie Taylor, are sent to Berlin to investigate the murder of a colleague whose very presence in Germany is something of a mystery. While the German authorities attribute the agent’s murder to Islamic terrorism, Scott and Maggie discover something far more sinister: a eugenics-fueled conspiracy. Though descriptions of the political intrigue tend to drag on, there are also striking twists and a cinematic finale with Odin revealed and the evil exposed. Readers can relish a beautifully written narrative that displays the crushing power of the past.” — Don Crinklaw. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2023.

“Duel to the Death” by J. A. Jance — “Settling into a quieter life a decade after a career scandal, a once-high profile newscaster is approached by someone from her past who compels her to choose between helping and jeopardizing her future.” — Atlas Publishing

“No Strangers Here” by Carlene O’Connor — “Set in Ireland’s striking, rugged countryside, Carlene O’Connor’s dark, atmospheric new crime fiction series combines the eerie atmosphere of Tana French and Louise Penny with the compulsively taut plotting of Dervla McTiernan and Lucy Foley, as an Irish veterinarian grapples with life, death, family dynamics, and the secrets at the heart of her small community…” — Publisher Annotation:

“Robert B. Parker’s Blood Feud” by Mike Lupica — “Robert B. Parker’s iconic and irresistible PI Sunny Randall is back, and the stakes are higher than ever as she races to protect her ex-husband–and his Mafia family–from the vengeful plan of a mysterious rival. Sunny Randall is “on” again with Richie, the ex-husband she never stopped loving and never seemed to be able to let go, despite her discomfort with his Mafia connections. …” — ONIX Annotations

“Robert B. Parker’s Fallout” by Mike Lupica — “When two seemingly unconnected mysterious deaths occur on his watch, police chief Jesse Stone must pull out all the stops to unravel the truth and stop a killer from striking again.” — Publisher Annotation:

“The A List” by J. A. Jance — “Settling into a quieter life a decade after a career scandal, a once-high-profile newscaster is approached by someone from her past who compels her to make a difficult choice.” — Atlas Publishing

“The Frozen River” by Ariel Lawhon — “The narrator of Ariel Lawhon’s The Frozen River is another stalwart heroine. . .detailed descriptions of the routines of village life give this narrative its intimate sense of connection — and set [the narrator] up for a pivotal confrontation.” –-The New York Times Book Review

“The Only One Left” by Riley Sager — “Propulsive … a dizzying Gothic whodunit.” —New York Times Book Review

“The Secret” by Lee and Andrew Child — “In 1992, when eight respectable, upstanding people are found dead across the US, Jack Reacher, assigned as the Army’s representative, must discover the link between these victims and who killed them, navigating around the ulterior motives and deciding if he should bring the bad guys to justice the official way—or his way.” — Atlas Publishing

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“Can’t You Just Get Over It: A Memoir” by Angela Kehler — “A coming-of-age memoir set against the backdrop of isolation and extreme belief. A bit of cult intrigue, abuse survival, and an unlikely love story.” — Amazon.com

“Horse-Drawn Yogurt: Stories from a Total Loss Farm” by Peter Gould — “Total Loss Farm in Guilford, Vermont, was and is a wordy place. Its hilly acres and flimsy buildings provided a refuge from a riven country, a place to grow paragraphs and stanzas, among the tilled rows of the market garden. … Peter left the farm to pursue love and work. In Horse-Drawn Yogurt, Peter returns to offer his take on how we lived in times that seem exotic, yet oddly familiar…” — Amazon.com

“My Name is Barbra” by Barbara Streisband — “A 970-page victory lap past all who ever doubted, diminished or dissed her. . . . Exuberant and glorious. . . . There are just so many scintillating Streisands to contemplate over so many years: singer, actress, director, producer, philanthropist, activist, lover, mother, wife, friend, autobiographer.” —Alexandra Jacobs, New York Times Book Review

“The Best Minds: A Story of Friendship, Madness and the Tragedy of Good Intentions” by Jonathan Rosen– “Acclaimed author Jonathan Rosen’s haunting investigation of the forces that led his closest childhood friend, Michael Laudor, from the heights of brilliant promise to the forensic psychiatric hospital where he has lived since killing the woman he loved. A story about friendship, love, and the price of self-delusion, The Best Minds explores the ways in which we understand—and fail to understand—mental illness.” — Amazon.com

“The Morse Code: Legacy of a Vermont Sportswriter” by Brendan Buckley
— “… chronicles the life of a veteran sports editor whose contributions to the youth of a small community echo across the Green Mountains today. He was a widely respected reporter, and an ever-willing conversationalist, yet few readers know of his obstacles in life. Dave Morse overcame trauma and heartbreak and was admired for his empathy, kindness, and generosity.” — Amazon.com

ADULT NON-FICTION

“A Northern Gardener’s Guide to Native Plants and Pollinators: Creating Habitat in the Northeast, Great Lakes, and Upper Midwest” by Lorraine Johnson and Sheila Colla — “If you’re a gardener (or aspiring gardener) in the Northeast, Upper Midwest, or Great Lakes region, this beautiful 4-color guide will become your go-to reference to the most beneficial plants in your area. It includes profiles of more than 300 native plants, featuring lovely illustrations and photos, information on blooming periods, exposure, soil moisture, and good plant companions, as well as how each species supports specific pollinators.” — Amazon.com

“Chaat: Recipes from the Kitchens, Markets and Railways of India” by Maneet Chauhan & Jody Eddy — “A sumptuous whistle-stop tour of India’s diverse food ways. Maneet has penned a love letter to the best of Indian food.” —Padma Lakshmi, host and executive producer of Top Chef and Taste the Nation

“Engines: The Inner Workings of Machines that Move the World” by Theodore W. Gray — “… Theodore Gray explores how everyday things work in great detail, going so far as to build some of them himself . . . What Gray did in his previous books about elements, molecules, and reactions, he has now done for the mechanical systems that run our world, and the result is a beautiful appreciation for systems we all often overlook.”―Ars Technica

“Fighting for Space: Two Pilots and their Historic Battle for Female Spaceflight” by Amy Shira Teitel — “Breathtaking…If you come to this book without any knowledge of the nascent days of spaceflight, Teitel’s writing will immediately immerse you in this foreign landscape, making you feel like you’re experiencing the personal journeys of these remarkable characters right alongside them. If you do have a knowledge of many of the events, her writing will likely only deepen whatever your opinion was going into the story.”―Forbes

“For the Love of Vermont: The Lyman Orton Collection” by Anita Rafeel — “… the book tells the story of how Orton assembled the collection over many years while still running The Vermont Country Store. It is also packed with photographs of the paintings, as well as stories of the artists and their love of Vermont.” — Bennington Museum

“India is Broken: A People Betrayed, Independence to Today” by Ashoka Mody — “A provocative new account of how India moved relentlessly from its hope-filled founding in 1947 to the dramatic economic and democratic breakdowns of today.” — Perseus Publishing

“Oscar Wars: A History of Hollywood in Gold, Sweat, and Tears” by Michael Schulman — “Chronicling the remarkable, sprawling history of the Academy Awards and the personal dramas that have played out on the stage and off camera, this entertaining exploration of the Oscars features a star-studded cast of some of the most powerful Hollywood players of today and yesterday.” — Baker & Taylor

“Prequel: An American Fight Against Fascism” by Rachel Maddow– “Maddow’s book is a ripping read—well rendered, fast-paced and delivered with the same punch and assurance that she brings to a broadcast. . . . Prequel is a valuable window into the authoritarian mind-set—and the process by which self-professed patriots turn against democracy . . . the parallels to the present day are strong, even startling . . .”—The New York Times

“Quick and Legal Will Book” by Denis Clifford — “The most streamlined, yet thorough information available on how to write a valid will quickly and safely without a lawyer.” — Long Beach Press-Telegram

“Sailing True North: Ten Admirals and the Voyage of Character” by Admiral James Stavridis — “[An] earnest mixture of biography, memoir, and pop psychology . . . readers will absorb some significant naval history . . . Stavridis, the former Supreme Allied Commander at NATO and current chairman of the U.S. Naval Institute, has done his research in the works of popular historians . . . [These] biographies make good reading.” —Kirkus

“Some People Need Killing: A Memoir of Murder in My Country” by Patricia Evangelista — “Evangelista makes us feel the fear and grief that she felt as she chronicled what Duterte was doing to her country. But appealing to our emotions is only part of it; what makes this book so striking is that she wants us to think about what happened, too. She pays close attention to language, and not only because she is a writer. Language can be used to communicate, to deny, to threaten, to cajole. Duterte’s language is coarse and degrading. Evangelista’s is evocative and exacting.”—The New York Times

“Souls of the Black Folk: A Graphic Interpretation” by W. E. B. du Bois, adapted by Paul Peart-Smith — “The preeminent Black intellectual of his generation, Du Bois wrote about the trauma of seeing the Reconstruction era’s promise of racial equality cruelly dashed by the rise of white supremacist terror and Jim Crow laws. Yet he also argued for the value of African American cultural traditions and provided inspiration for countless civil rights leaders who followed him. Now artist Paul Peart-Smith offers the first graphic adaptation of Du Bois’s seminal work.” — Amazon.com

“The Half Known Life: In Search of Paradise” by Pico Iyer — “Reading Mr. Iyer’s book in the depth of winter, in a troubled world, it’s heartening to think that paradise—or at least a glimpse of it—might be available from where we sit.” –Wall Street Journal

“The Iliad” by Homer translated by Emily Wilson — “The culmination of a decade of intense engagement with antiquity’s most surpassingly beautiful and emotionally complex poetry, Wilson’s Iliad now gives us a complete Homer for our generation.” — Amazon.com

“The Rediscovery of America: Native Peoples and the Unmaking of American History” by Ned Blackhawk — “Even as the telling of American history has become more complex and nuanced, Native Americans tend to be absent. Blackhawk, a professor at Yale, confronts that absence in this sweeping account of how Native Americans shaped the country legally, politically, and culturally.”—Washington Post

“The Undertow: Scenes from the a Slow Civil War” by Jeff Sharlet — “Poetic descriptions of America’s landscape and history punctuate Sharlet’s unsettling insights into the undercurrents of fear, isolation, and anger coursing through the country. It’s a jaw-dropping portrait of a country on the edge.” ― Publishers Weekly

“The Vegan Chinese Kitchen: Recipes and Modern Stories from a Thousand-Year-Old Tradition” by Hannah Che — “Through stunning photography, stories and recipes, the creator of The Plant-Based Wok draws upon a fascinating subset of Chinese cookery that emphasizes umami-rich ingredients and can be traced back over centuries to Buddhist temple kitchens to introduce readers to a whole world of flavors and ingredients.” — Atlas Publishing

“The Wager: A Tale of Shipwreck, Mutiny and Murder” by David Grann — “The most gripping sea-yarn I’ve read in years….A tour de force of narrative nonfiction. Mr. Grann’s account show how storytelling, whether to judges or readers, can shape individual and national fortunes – as well as our collective memories.” — Wall Street Journal 

“The Wisdom of our Hands: Crafting, a Life” by Doug Stowe — “Woodworking craftsman and educator Doug Stowe makes a passionate case for reintegrating mind and body in both education and life in his new book The Wisdom of Our Hands: Crafting, A Life.“—Australian Wood Review

“Tools: A Visual Exploration of Implements and Devices in the Workshop” by Theodore W. Gray — “Similar in format to a woodland field guide, each entry provides high-quality color photos by Nick Mann and concise, thoughtful, explanations of history, design, and function. Gray’s attitude about tools is candid and frequently playful. . . . Although unquestionably authoritative, it does not take itself too seriously, and the author’s droll humor will help even the most timid workshop novice get comfortable with tools.” ― Booklist

War at Sea: A Shipwrecked History from Antiquity to the Twentieth Century” by James P. Delgado — “A detailed and well-documented global tour of the history of lost warships over 3,000 years of prehistory and history . . . an incredible piece of research by one of the pioneers of underwater cultural studies . . . a masterpiece that will be a benchmark for understanding the significance of shipwreck history for decades to come.”- The Naval Historical Foundation

“What an Owl Knows: The New Science of the World’s Most Enigmatic Birds” by Jennifer Ackerman — “[Ackerman] offers an absorbing ear-tuft-to-tail appreciation of the raptor that Mary Oliver, a poet, called a ‘god of plunge and blood.’ Owls, it seems, know a lot. Ms. Ackerman draws on recent research to explain what and how.” —The Economist

BLUE/DVD MOVIES

“Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny”

BOARD BOOK

“Little Blue Truck’s Christmas” by Alice Schertle

PICTURE BOOK

“A Delicious Story” by Barney Saltzberg
“A Family Like Ours” by Frank Murphy
“A Head Full of Birds” by Alexandra Garibal
“A Practical Present for Philippa Pheasant” by Briony May Smith
“Bright Winter Night” by Alli Brydon
“Don’t Worry, Wuddles” by Lita Judge
“Fix and Stitch” by Barbara Naas
“Frank and Bert” by Chris Naylor-Ballesteros
“From Here to There: A First Book of Maps” by Vivian French
“Hello, Mister Blue” by Daria Peoples
“If I Was a Horse” by Sophie Blackall
“Just Like Grandma” by Kim Rogers
“Merlina and the Magical Mishap” by Daniela Drescher
“Nell Plants a Tree” by Anne Wynter
“Over and Under the Waves” by Kate Messner
“Remember” by Joy Harjo
“Runaway Pond” by Nancy Price Graff
“Say My Name” by Joanna Ho
“Stacy’s Remarkable Books” by Stacey Abrams
“The Artivist” by Nikkolas Smith
“The Book from Far Away” by Bruce Handy
“The Christmas Book Flood” by Emily Kilgore
“The Family Tree” by Sean Dixon
“The Storytellers Rule” by Christy Mandin
“This Book is Banned” by Raj Jaldar
“Too Much! An Overwhelming Day” by Jolene Guiterrez
“We, the Curious Ones” by Marion Dane Bauer
“What Can You Do with a Rock?” by Pat Zietlow Miller
“Wheels: The Big Fun Book of Vehicles” by Tom Schamp
“Winter: A Solstice Story” by Kelsey Ebben Gross

EASY READER

“Bramble and Maggie: Snowy Day” by Jessie Haas
“Cornbread & Poppy” by Mathew Cordell
“Fergus and Zeke” by Kate Messner


JUVENILE BIOGRAPHY

“The Girl Heard the Music: How One Pianist and 85,000 Bottles and Cans Brought New Hope to an Island” by Marni Fogelson and Mahani Teave — ” Accompanied by vibrant, delightful visuals, this upbeat and fascinating story will leave readers feeling as though they, too, can make a difference when it comes to helping the planet.” ― Kirkus Reviews

“The Little Books of the Little Brontes” by Sara O’Leary and Briony May Smith — “In a deeply sensitive work, O’Leary (Gemma and the Giant Girl) and Smith (The Mermaid Moon) focus on the diminutive volumes that Charlotte, Anne, Emily, and Branwell Brontë made for each other as children living in austere circumstances.” —STARRED REVIEW, Publishers Weekly

JUVENILE DVD

“Oddball”

JUVENILE FICTION

“A Sky Full of Song” by Susan Lynn Meyer — “In 1905 North Dakota, eleven-year-old Russian immigrant Shoshana is bullied for being Jewish, but after listening to the music of her homeland, she is reminded of the resilience and traditions her people have brought all the way to the prairie” — Baker & Taylor

“As Long as the Lemon Tree Grows” by Zoulfa Katouh — “Katouh’s lyrical prose, combined with a moving portrayal of first love, unflinchingly depicts both the costs of revolution, and the strength it takes to fight for one’s beliefs.”―Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Attack of the Black Rectangles” by Amy Sarig King –“Mystical, fablelike… just right for a sensitive sixth-grader with a growing self- and world awareness trying to navigate the troubled waters of uncertain friendships and demeaning bullying. A finely wrought, magical coming-of-age tale with a convincing message.” — Kirkus Reviews

Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Chalice of the Gods” by Rick Riordan — “Percy Jackson’s hope for a normal senior year is shattered as the gods present him with three quests, beginning with the retrieval of Zeus’s goblet, in order to get the necessary three letters of recommendation for college.” — Baker & Taylor

“Remember Us” by Jacqueline Woodson — “Exceptional. . . . Written in lyrical prose, Remember Us is a poetic time capsule from the 12-year-old Sage, an African American girl living in the Bushwick section of Brooklyn during the 1970s. . . . What struck me about this novel was not only its commemoration of those horrific Bushwick fires . . . but also how Woodson conjures such a captivating, elegiac story from their ashes. . . . Will help tweens process their grief after trauma.” —The New York Times Book Review

“The Skull” by Jon Klassen — “Jon Klassen’s signature wry humor takes a turn for the ghostly in this thrilling retelling of a traditional Tyrolean folktale. …The Skull is as empowering as it is mysterious and foreboding.” — Publisher Annotation:

“The Storyteller” by Brandon Hobson — “From National Book Award finalist Brandon Hobson, a kaleidoscopic middle-grade adventure that mixes the anxieties, friendships, and wonders of a Cherokee boy’s life with Cherokee history and lore.” — Amazon.com

“The Swallowtail Legacy: Wreck at Ada’s Reef” by Michael D. Bell — “Fans of mystery will enjoy how Lark goes all out to solve this case. . . . Main characters are well fleshed out, and the author does a wonderful job of bringing this island and its inhabitants to life. . . . An entertaining mystery for fans of Sammy Keyes and Nancy Drew about family, loss, and the importance of ­friendship.”—School Library Journal

“Yonder” by Ali Standish — “Set in small-town Appalachia during WWII, Standish’s (The Mending Summer) uplifting mystery tackles big themes of abuse, bullying, heroism, mental health, and prejudice…Through an elegant voice and a series of flashbacks, the mystery of Jack’s disappearance unfolds alongside the story of Danny’s friendship with him, the increasing clarity with which Danny sees life as far from perfect, and the small but meaningful steps he takes to discover what bravery means.” — Publishers Weekly (starred review)

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Cat Kid: Comic Book Influencers” by Dav Pilkey — “Cat Kid Comic Club is back in session in this groundbreaking graphic novel narrative by Dav Pilkey, the worldwide bestselling and award-winning author and illustrator of Dog Man.” — Amazon.com

JUVENILE NON-FICTION

“Chinese Menu: The History, Myths, and Legends Behind Your Favorite Foods” by Grace Lin — “Newbery and Caldecott honoree and New York Times bestselling author Grace Lin delivers a groundbreaking, lushly illustrated, and beautifully written full-color book that explores the whimsical myths and stories behind your favorite American Chinese food.” — Publisher’s Annotation

“Colonization and the Wampanoag Story: Race to the Truth” by Linda Coombs — “When you think about the beginning of the American story, what comes to mind? Three ships in 1492, or perhaps buckled hats and shoes stepping off of the Mayflower, ready to start a new country. But the truth is, Christopher Columbus, the Pilgrims, and the Colonists didn’t arrive to a vast, empty land ready to be developed. They arrived to find people and communities living in harmony with the land they had inhabited for thousands of years, and they quickly disrupted everything they saw” — Publisher’s Annotation

“Different Kinds of Minds: A Guide to Your Brain” by Temple Grandin — “The author, with her knack for making science easy to understand, explains different types of thinkers and how all minds need to work together to create solutions to help solve real-world problems. Simultaneous eBook. Illustrations.” — Atlas Publishing

“Dogs: A History of Our Best Friends” by Lita Judge — “A tail-wagging tribute. The heartwarming narrative is more than matched by the intense appeal of the cheery, alert, eminently pettable looking four-legged cast in the illustrations. Sweeter than a scratch behind the ears.”―Kirkus Reviews

“History Smashers; Christopher Columbus and the Taino People” by Kate Messner and Jose Barreiro — “…Columbus never actually set foot in what is now the United States. His voyages took him to islands in the Caribbean and along the coast of South America. The truth is, when Columbus first arrived, Indigenous peoples, including the Taino, had been living there for thousands of years, raising their families, running their societies, and trading with their neighbors. He didn’t “discover” the lands at all! And his name? Not even really Christopher Columbus!”– Baker & Taylor

“How to Build a Human: In Seven Evolutionary Steps” by Pamela S. Turner — “An acclaimed science writer breaks down human evolution into seven important steps, in this funny and fascinating book vetted by experts at the Smithsonian’s Human Origins Program.” — Atlas Publishing

“So You Want to Be a Frog: Everything There is to Know about Frogs!” by Jane Porter — “Fabio Frog gives readers the scoop on how they can be fabulous frogs…and a clever dose of frog facts to boot. . . . Fabio breaks down the 10 rules of being a frog and encourages readers to attempt many, giving them kudos for the skills that humans will have an easier time handling. . . Croaking, frog paleontology, keeping cool, and eating habits are also covered along with some random facts that are sure to amaze and astound any audience.” —Kirkus Reviews

“The Astronaut’s Guide to Leaving the Planet” by Terry Virts — “In this exciting book, a former NASA astronaut inspires the next generation of space travelers with answers to all kids’ questions on how people become astronauts, how they prepare for space travel, and what it’s like to live and work in space.” — Grand Central Publishing

“The Handbook of Forgotten Skills: Timeless Fun for a New Generation” by Elaine Batiste and Natalie Crowley — “An illustrated step-by-step guide to classic fun and handy skills for a new generation….Each chapter includes clear, illustrated step-by-step instructions as well as information about the history of that skill. For example, did you know that lemonade is credited with helping fight the plague in Paris? Or that paper airplanes became popular during World War II because traditional toys weren’t available?” — Publisher’s Annotation

“The Kid’s Book of Elements: An Awesome Introduction to Every Known Atom in the Universe” by Theodore Gray — “In this very special kids edition of Theodore Gray’s The Elements, budding scientists, ages 6 to 9, will learn all about every element in the periodic table from the first element, Hydrogen (1), to the very last element, Oganesson (118). Filled with great big colorful photographs and fun facts for every element, The Kid’s Book of The Elements is the perfect introduction to the fascinating world of chemistry and visual/tactile-based STEM/STEAM learning.” — Grand Central Publishing

“What Goes on Inside a Beaver Pond?” by Becky Cushing Gap — “… What Goes on inside a Beaver Pond? takes kids ages 8 to 10 on a journey through a year in the life of a young beaver (called a “kit”). Throughout the seasons, vibrant illustrations and descriptions reveal the hidden inner-workings of a beaver lodge, how beavers fell trees with their teeth and create a wetland habitat, how they collect food and ward off predators, and what daily life is like within a beaver colony”– Baker & Taylor

“What the Eagle Sees: Indigenous Stories Rebellion and Renewal” by Eldon Yellowhorn — “What do people do when their civilization is invaded? Indigenous people have been faced with disease, war, broken promises, and forced assimilation. Despite crushing losses and insurmountable challenges, they formed new nations from the remnants of old ones, they adopted new ideas and built on them, they fought back, and they kept their cultures alive. When the only possible “victory” was survival, they survived.” — Publisher’s Annotation

“What’s Inside a Caterpillar Cocoon? And Other Questions about Moths and Butterflies” by Rachel Igntofsky — “With warm and heart-fluttering illustrations, discover the next nonfiction picture book about butterflies and moths from the creator of the New York Times bestseller Women in Science! Butterflies soar in the sunlight. While moths flutter under the moon and stars. Find out more about these mysterious and majestic insects — Publisher Annotation

“What a Map Can Do” by Gabrielle Balkan — “An accessible and humorous introduction to maps for budding navigators. A raccoon narrator embarks on a big adventure in this exciting exploration of maps for the youngest readers. Traditional maps of cities, roads, and parks are joined by some less conventional ones such as inside the body, each one methodically introduced with humor and clear explanation. A clever, colorful, and engaging first look at constructing and decoding maps.” — Publisher Annotation

“Wombats are Pretty Weird: A [not so] Serious Guide” by Abi Cushman — “[An] informative field guide that professes not to take itself too seriously . . . Adorable, cartoonish illustrations of all three kinds of wombat, a snake sidekick named Joey (just like a baby wombat), and speech-bubble dialogue lend a layer of humor and reinforce the concepts introduced by the text.” — Booklist

YOUNG ADULT FICTION

“Gather” by Kenneth M. Cadow — “A resourceful teenager in rural Vermont struggles to hold on to the family home while his mom recovers from addiction in this striking debut novel.” — Amazon.com

“Murtagh: World of Eragon” by Christopher Paolini — “Master storyteller and internationally bestselling author Christopher Paolini returns to the World of Eragon in this stunning epic fantasy set a year after the events of the Inheritance Cycle. Join Dragon Rider—and fan favorite—Murtagh and his dragon as they confront a perilous new enemy! The world is no longer safe for the Dragon Rider Murtagh and his dragon, Thorn. An evil king has been toppled, and they are left to face the consequences of the reluctant role they played in his reign of terror. Now they are hated and alone, exiled to the outskirts of society.” —Publisher Annotation:

“The Marrow Thieves” by Cherie Dimaline — “Just when you think you have nothing left to lose, they come for your dreams. Humanity has nearly destroyed its world through global warming, but now an even greater evil lurks. The Indigenous people of North America are being hunted and harvested for their bone marrow, which carries the key to recovering something the rest of the population has lost: the ability to dream. In this dark world, Frenchie and his companions struggle to survive as they make their way up north to the old lands. For now, survival means staying hidden – but what they don’t know is that one of them holds the secret to defeating the marrow thieves.” — ONIX Annotations

Categories
Highlighted New Arrivals

The In-Between: Unforgettable Encounters During Life’s Final Moments

Hadley Vlahos, RN

“Tender and transformative . . . The great surprise of The In-Between is that it makes dying feel like a peaceful, dynamic, and nourishing event that can potentially transform the lives of those who are left behind. Readers will cheer on Hadley Vlahos and, like me, be forever grateful that she wrote this book.”—Christie Tate, New York Times bestselling author of Group

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – NOVEMBER 2023

ADULT FICTION

“A Council of Dolls” by Mona Susan Power — “Power’s deep knowledge of Indigenous history comes through in keen depictions of the Indian schools, and she illuminates the characters’ struggles with generation trauma, which arise as they try to sustain their co”nnections to the past. This story of survival shines brightly.” — Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Against the Loveless World” by Susan Ajulhawa — “[A]t its heart, Abulhawa’s novel is a love story . . . but this is a love story that cannot escape its geography, and Abulhawa elegantly crafts a world where the tension between desire and survival is laid bare.” ― New Yorker

“Barn 8” by Deb Olin Unferth — “Kaleidoscopic. . . . Unferth’s lens, which telescopes through time and space, is unafraid to linger on the bizarre and vicious cycle of birth-death, need-fulfillment and supply-demand that this phantom-run barn universe perpetuates. . . . Yet Unferth never traffics in gratuitous shock. Instead, her sentences and constantly shifting point of view are embroidered with a great deal of unexpected tenderness and optimism.”―Los Angeles Times

“Blackouts” by Justin Torres — “The supreme pleasure of [Blackouts] is its slow obliteration of any firm idea of reality―a perfect metaphor for the delirious disorientation that comes with learning queer history as an adult . . . Torres haunts this book full of ghosts like a ghost himself, and with this novel, he has passed the haunting on, creating the next link in a queer chain from Jan to Juan to nene to you.”―Hugh Ryan, The New York Times Book Review

“Day” by Michael Cunningham — “Michael Cunningham writes such eloquent, seductive sentences that we have to keep reminding ourselves to step back and pay attention to his appealing, dimensional characters and to his generous vision of childhood and adulthood, of work and love, of the pleasures and griefs of family life, and of all the rich complexities of being human.”—Francine Prose

“Holly” by Stephen King — “What makes King’s work so much more frightening than that of most other suspense writers, what elevates it to night-terror levels, isn’t his cruelty to his characters: It’s his kindness.” —Flynn Berry, New York Times Book Review

“In Another Time” by Jillian Cantor — “Cantor elevates love as a powerful force that transcends tragedy and shows how music speaks to even the cruelest hearts. [In Another Time is] a powerful story that exalts the strength of the human spirit.” — Kirkus

“Lilacs in the Dust Bowl” by Diana Stevan — “Heart-wrenching and uplifting saga. This series is a compelling, inspiring story of an immigrant family’s trials and tribulations. It follows Lukia Mazurets’ journey just before (and during) the Great Depression, as she and her children migrate from the Ukraine to North America. It is so well told and moving, and the detailed landscape made me feel right in the story.” — Martha Conway, author of The Physician’s Daughter

“Let Us Descend” by Jesmyn Ward — “Superb . . . Angry, beautiful, raw, visceral, and heartfelt, Let Us Descend is the literary equivalent of an open wound from which poetry pours. . . . Ward has taken Black history in a time of racial and political turmoil and used it to scream about grief and injustice, but also about beauty, queer love, history, determination, and joy.” —NPR

“Night Watch” by Jayne Anne Phillips — “Gorgeous prose, attention to detail, and masterful characters . . . Set in West Virginia during and after the Civil War, Phillips’ book takes as given that slavery was evil and the war a necessity, focusing instead on lives torn apart by the conflict and on the period’s surprisingly enlightened approach toward care of the mentally ill . . . Pitch-perfect voice . . . Haunting storytelling and a refreshing look at history.” Kirkus, starred

“Red Rabbit” by Alex Grecian — “A witch, a demon, a shapeshifter, ghosts, and cannibals are just some of the characters whose exploits enliven this sprawling, picaresque post–Civil War weird western from Grecian.” ―Publishers Weekly

“So Late in the Day: Stories of Women and Men” by Claire Keegan — “Tight, potent . . . [Keegan] has chosen her details carefully. Everything means something . . . Her details are so natural that readers might not immediately understand their significance. The stories grow richer with each read . . . [These stories] have new and powerful things to say about the ever-mystifying, ever-colliding worlds of contemporary Irish women and the men who stand in their way.” — Minneapolis Star Tribune

“Starling House” by Alix E. Harrow — “Harrow’s mash-up of twisted fairy tales and Southern gothic fiction is a haunting story of longing, lies, and generational curses.” Library Journal, starred review

“The Exchange: After the Firm” by John Grisham — “#1 New York Times bestselling author John Grisham delivers high-flying international suspense in a stunning new legal thriller that marks the return of Mitch McDeere, the brilliant hero of The Firm.” — Baker & Taylor

“Tomorrow, and Tomorrow and Tomorrow” by Gabrielle Zevin — “Woven throughout [Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow] are meditations on originality, appropriation, the similarities between video games and other forms of art, the liberating possibilities of inhabiting a virtual world, and the ways in which platonic love can be deeper and more rewarding—especially in the context of a creative partnership—than romance.” —The New Yorker

“Trust” by Hernan Diaz –“Intricate, cunning and consistently surprising…Much of the novel’s pleasure derives from its unpredictabiility…Add Henry James to Wharton, and Thomas Mann too…Exhilarating and intelligent novel.” —New York Times

ADULT MYSTERY

“12 Months to Live” by James Patterson and Mike Lupica — “An ex-NYPD beat cop, unrelenting PI and undefeated defense attorney, terminally ill Jane Smith, while knee-deep in the murder of trial of the century, is targeted by a killer who’s determined to end her life before her expiration date.” — Atlas Publishing

“Face of Greed” by James L’Etoile — “Smart-mouthed, tough, pull-no-punches Emily will do whatever it takes to solve the case, and she and Javier keep investigating until they finally uncover the tragic, shocking truth. The suspenseful, twist-a-minute, fast-moving plot . . . make[s] this an outstanding must-read.” —Booklist (Starred Review)

“From a Far and Lovely Country” by Alexander McCall Smith — “McCall Smith’s No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency is one of the most reliably entertaining cozy series running, soothingly returning readers to the tiny Botswana office of Mma Precious Ramotswe, the wise and resourceful founder of the agency that she operates with her comically snarky and over-reaching assistant, Mma Grace Makutsi, with whom she discusses detective strategy over mugs of South African red bush tea. . . . This is largely a comic novel, enlivened by Precious’ reflections, Grace’s jockeying for status, and part-time mechanic and apprentice detective Charlie’s struggles to overcome his unreliability. A total delight.” —Booklist [starred review]

“Killing Moon” by Jo Nesbo — “Readers are privy to the doings of a man calling himself Prim, who emerges as the creepiest villain this side of a Thomas Harris novel . . . Nesbø excels at manipulating this sort of ghoulish material. He can heighten suspense with a single word and wrong-foot the most attentive customer.” —Wall Street Journal

“Resurrection Walk” by Michael Connelly — “A stunning combination of police and legal procedural. . . As always, Connelly makes the tedious work of investigation fascinating as he shuttles between Mickey’s and Harry’s hard-bitten points of view.”―Booklist (starred)

“Robert B Parker’s Bad Influence” by Alison Gaylin — “Taking over the franchise for the first time, Gaylin proves the equal of Sunny’s creator in plotting….She doesn’t sound all that much like Parker; she sounds better. Gaylin brings Sunny to terms with contemporary social media even as she uncovers motives older than you can imagine.” —Kirkus Reviews

“The Collector” by Daniel Silva — “Legendary art restorer and spy Gabriel Allon joins forces with a brilliant and beautiful master-thief to track down the world’s most valuable missing painting but soon finds himself in a desperate race to prevent an unthinkable conflict between Russia and the West.” — Harper Collins

“The Girl in the Eagle’s Talons” by Karin Smirnoff — “Propulsive . . . Smirnoff adds new maturity and depth to the two leads, offers several jaw-dropping plot twists . . . Fans will find it a worthy addition to the series.”—Publishers Weekly

“The Last Devil to Die” by Richard Osman — “Osman doesn’t disappoint… Everything is here that fans of the series have come to expect: humour, warmth, the confounding of expectations as these pensioners investigate… Along with the laughs, there is grief, and an ending that is handled sensitively (I was weeping)… We all need a regular injection of the Thursday Murder Club to keep our spirits up.” — The Guardian

“The Raging Storm” by Ann Cleeves — “Cleeves crafts a devilishly intricate mystery that will surprise even seasoned genre fans, and Venn remains an appealing lead every bit as memorable as the author’s Vera Stanhope or Jimmy Perez. Cleeves’s fans and newcomers alike will be hungry for the next entry.”―Publishers Weekly (Starred Review)

“The Secret” by Lee Child — “Reacher is the stuff of myth. . . . One of this century’s most original, tantalizing pop-fiction heroes.'”—The Washington Post

“The Secret Hours” by Mick Herron — “Herron keeps up his gravity-defying balancing act: belly-laugh spy spoof on one side, elegiac state-of-the-nation satire on the other, with a thin, taut line of polished prose between.”
Financial Times

“The Spy Coast” by Tess Gerritsen — “This is a nice take on retirement―five old spooks whose bones may ache but whose minds remain sharp. You can expect mystery, action, and bloodshed in this exciting thriller launched straight from the peaceful shores of Maine.” ―Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“Unto Us a Son is Born” by Donna Leon — “Venetians love to gossip, Donna Leon advises us in Unto Us a Son Is Given, her latest mystery featuring that most compassionate of policemen, Guido Brunetti, commissario di polizia. There’s bound to be talk when Gonzalo Rodriguez de Tejeda, the rich Spanish godfather of Brunetti’s wife, Paola, adopts his lover and makes the young man his legal heir . . . This cop is neither jaded nor callous, and he has that rare quality Italians would call ‘un cuore d’oro,’ a heart of gold.”―Marilyn Stasio, New York Times Book Review

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“I’ve Been Thinking” by Daniel C. Bennett — “A delightful memoir from one of our deepest thinkers.” ― Kirkus (starred review)

“We Could Have Been Friends, My Father and I: A Palestinian Memory” by Raja Shehadeh — “Profoundly personal as well as historically significant…In his moral clarity and baring of the heart, his self-questioning and insistence on focusing on the experience of the individual within the storms of nationalist myth and hubris, Shehadeh recalls writers such as Ghassan Kanafani and Primo Levi…a quiet and deeply felt book that illustrates how being dispossessed and being occupied are not merely legal or political conditions.” —New York Times Book Review

ADULT NON-FICTION

“A City on Mars: Can We Settle Space, Should We Settle Space and Have We Really Thought This Through?” by Kelly Weinersmith — “An exceptional new piece of popular science . . . Forceful, engaging and funny . . . an essential reality check for anyone who has ever looked for home in the night sky . . . hilarious. The breezy prose is studded with charming cartoons… This book will make you happy to live on this planet — a good thing, because you’re not leaving anytime soon.” —New York Times Book Review

He/She/They: How We Talk about Gender and Why It Matters” by Schuyler Bailar — “A wonderfully clear and convincing guide to comprehending and defending gender diversity.”―Kirkus, Starred Review

“How to Know a Person: The Art of Seeing Others Deeply and Being Deeply Seen” by David Brooks — “Drawing from the fields of psychology and neuroscience and from the worlds of theater, philosophy, history and education, one of the nation’s leading writers and commentators helps us become more understanding considerate toward others, and to find the joy that comes from being seen.” — Baker & Taylor

“My Vermont Table: Recipes for All (Six) Seasons” by Gesine Bullock-Prado — “This is an utterly charming title that delivers a sense of place with its beauty and narrative, but its wow factor comes from Bullock-Prado’s recipes, which are pure Vermont.” ― Library Journal

“The Core of an Onion: Peeling the Rarest Common Food — Featuring More than 100 Historical Recipes” by Mark Kurlansky — “Featuring historical images and his own pen-and-ink drawings, and including 25 recipes from around the world, a New York Times-bestselling and James Beard Award-winning author peels back the cultural, historical and gastronomical layers of one of the world’s most beloved culinary staples.” — Atlas Publishing

“The Hundred Years” War on Palestine: A History of Settler Colonialism and Resistance, 1917-2017″ by Rashid Khalidi — “A richly informed, personalized account of a century of repression of a peoples’ national aspirations. . . . original and distinctive . . . a remarkable testament to the stubborn resistance that characterizes the Palestinians.” ―Washington Report on Middle East Affairs

“The In-Between: Unforgettable Encounters During Life’s Final Moments” by Hadley Vlahos, RN — “Tender and transformative . . . The great surprise of The In-Between is that it makes dying feel like a peaceful, dynamic, and nourishing event that can potentially transform the lives of those who are left behind. Readers will cheer on Hadley Vlahos and, like me, be forever grateful that she wrote this book.”—Christie Tate, New York Times bestselling author of Group

“The Mysteries” by Bill Watterson and John Kascht — “Bill Watterson’s return to print, after nearly three decades, comes in the form of a fable called “The Mysteries,” which shares with his famous comic strip a sense of enchantment.” (The New Yorker)

“The Sisterhood: The Secret History of Women at the CIA” by Liz Mundy — “Galvanizing . . . Brimming with startling, intriguing, and infuriating facts and insights, this arresting and suspenseful exposé is rooted in extensive interviews and research as exacting as that conducted by the brilliant women analysts Mundy profiles. . . . Every page is electric with revelations as Mundy vividly and perceptively portrays the remarkable women who covertly elevated this complicated, controversial, yet essential government agency.”Booklist (starred review)

“When Religion Hurts You: Healing from Religious Trauma and the Impact of High-Control Religion” by Laura E. Anderson — “Drawing on clinical research, stories from clients, and her own experience, an expert on religious trauma shows how readers can live as healing individuals after leaving a high-demand, high-control religious system”– Amazon.com

“Year of No Garbage: Recycling Lies, Plastic Problems, and One Woman’s Trashy Journey to Zero Waste: A Memoir” by Eve O. Schaub — “Between chicken coops, various storage containers for miscellaneous plastic, and multiple composting bins, Eve Schaub’s pandemic passion project looked a lot different than most people’s. . . . Schaub had the idea of completing an entire calendar year without throwing anything away. . . . The best-selling author has published her latest book documenting her most recent experimentation. . . . Despite the gravity of her findings, Schaub wanted readers to take away something positive from her lessons learned.” —NBC5, Vermont

PARENTING

“Growing Up in Public: Coming of Age in Digital World” by Devorah Heitner — “Astute advice on how parents can help their children navigate social media and other technology…. The levelheaded guidance is a refreshing antidote to more alarmist takes on the topic.” —Publishers Weekly

“Middle School Superpowers: Raising Resilient Tweens in Turbulent Times” by Phyllis L. Fagell — “A licensed clinical professional counselor and Washington Post education column contributor offers this practical, evidence-based and compassionate guide for parents and educators to help tweens navigate through challenging situations by providing 12 superpowers they need be confident, self-aware, independent and resilient. — Atlas Publishing

BLUE/DVD MOVIES

“Mission Impossible: Dead Reckoning”

“PICTURE BOOKS”

“Around the Table that Grandad Built” by Melanie Heiuser Hill
“Cape” by Kevin Johnson
“Dear Unicorn” by Josh Funk
“How Does Santa Go Down the Chimney?” by Mac Barnett
“I Love Strawberries” by Shannon Anderson
“Mine!” by Candace Fleming
“My Powerful Hair” by Carole Lindstrom
“Stillwater and Koo Save the World” by Jon J. Muth
“Tap! Tap! Tap! Dance! Dance! Dance!” by Herve Tullet
“The Time Machine: (Because It’s Never too Late to Apologize)” by Pauline David-Sax
“We Are Starlings: Inside the Mesmerizing Magic of Murmuration” by Robert Furros & Donna Jo Napoli
“When You Can Swim” by Jack Wong

JUVENILE BIOGRAPHIES

“Autumn Peltier, Water Warrior” by Carole Lindstrom — “From New York Times bestselling picture book author Carole Lindstrom and illustrator Bridget George comes Autumn Peltier, Water Warrior, an inspiring picture book biography about two Indigenous Rights Activists, Josephine Mandamin and Autumn Peltier.” — Publisher’s Anotation

“Christo and Jeanne-Claude Wrap the World: The Story of Two Groundbreaking Environmental Artists” by Greg Neri — “Haidle’s vivacious, stylized mixed-media illustrations underscore a sense of the duo’s energy, inquisitiveness, and determination; the visuals, which portray background characters with varying skin tones, culminate with expansive spreads depicting the couple’s remarkable, ephemeral outdoor work. . . a wonderful tribute to coupledom, collaboration, and creativity that offers conceptual thoughts about art.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review)

JUVENILE DVD MOVIES

“Spider-Man: Across the Spider Vers

JUVENILE FICTION

“Coyote Queen” by Jessica Vitalis — “Twelve-year-old Felicity Ulyssa Dahlers, “Fud,” lives in a trailer in rural Wyoming with her mom and Larry—her mom’s abusive, ex-boxer boyfriend who’s in the grip of alcoholism. . . . Scrappy Fud demonstrates admirable coping mechanisms alongside awareness she shouldn’t have to live in fear, and the book’s coyote facts and symbolism nicely bolster Fud’s survivor mentality: ‘Sometimes leaving one pack meant finding another.’ . . . An honest, slice-of-underrepresented-life story with a speculative twist.” — Booklist

“Elf Dog & Owl Head” by M. T. Anderson — “A sparkling fantasy by the ever-inventive M.T. Anderson. . . . Much of the early humor in this very funny book comes from the disjunction between ordinary human things and the astonishing stuff of elsewhere. . . . Dramatic story turns, witty dialogue and zestful monochrome drawings by Junyi Wu combine to make a reading treat for 8- to 12-year-olds.” —The Wall Street Journal

“Greenwild” The World Behind the Door” by Pari Thomson — “This charmingly detailed story is truly a garden of delights, full of danger and magic, mystery and friendship. Daisy’s thrilling adventures will sweep you into a botanical world of delightful possibilities and sinister threats, while themes of environmental conservation and community cooperation will resonate with readers of all ages.” ― Jennifer Adam, author of The Last Windwitch

“Mascot” by Charles Waters and Traci Sorrell — “The story’s catalyst is Callie, a new student who’s Cherokee and repelled by all the face painting, whooping and tomahawk-chop chanting. Seeing Callie’s discomfort, her peers variously react with defensiveness, disengagement and self-examination. Although “Mascot”’s outcome sometimes seems preordained, Waters and Sorell’s plain-spoken verse is always sharp and direct.” —The New York Times Book Review

“Odder” by Katherine Applegate — “Applegate uses strands of nonfiction detail to anchor and give stability to Odder’s fictional story, much as sea otters use lengths of kelp to hold themselves in place while they sleep. Charles Santoso’s endearing black-and-white illustrations, meanwhile, add to the buoyancy of this accessible and informative story.” ―The Wall Street Journal

“Ruby Lost and Found” by Christina Li — “What begins as an isolating and overwhelming journey through grief turns hopeful as Ruby learns that she doesn’t have to navigate change alone.” — Horn Book Magazine

“The Cricket War” by Tho Pham — “While the protagonist’s journey is plagued by trauma and upheaval, and the authors detail Phạm’s and other Vietnamese refugees’ experiences to tear-jerking effect, the creators also offer comfort via joyful interactions throughout this carefully crafted, fast-paced read.” ―Publishers Weekly

“The Hungry Place” by Jessie Haas — “Tender-hearted readers (that is, all horse-loving readers) will…cheer Rae’s persistence and faith in her dreams. Readers’ sympathetic agony is eventually replaced with tears of happiness as Haas brings the story around to a rousing happily-ever after ending.” —The Horn Book

“The Lost Library” by Rebecca Stead — “When a makeshift Little Free Library appears on the town green, almost 20 years after the mysterious fire that burned down the town library, the people of Martinville are drawn together once more to not just solve the mystery of the fire but also to decide what it means for their own fates. Mass and Stead employ a rich cast of characters―including ghost librarians, graduating fifth-graders, mice, and a cat―to dive into the heart of Martinville. … Full of heart, sly narration, and Stead’s expected air of mystery, this is well suited for lovers of books and libraries and novels featuring ensemble casts.” ―Booklist

“The Wild Robot Protects” by Peter Brown — “Action and epic confrontations keep the plot swimming along, but there are meaningfully punctuated moments of humor and kindness. Roz continues to learn and grow, and Brown’s superb illustrations make her journey truly unforgettable.”―Booklist, starred

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Apple Crush” by Lucy Knisley — “Warm, fortifying, and cozy—like a drink of apple cider.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Clementine Fox and the Great Island Adventure” by Leigh Juna — “Warm colors provide a welcoming feel, animated facial expressions add verve, and themes of communal care, friendship, and overcoming obstacles permeate this gently humorous narrative.” — Publishers Weekly

JUVENILE NON-FICTION

“Ancestory: The Mystery and Majesty of Ancient Cave Art” by Hannah Salyer — “Breathtaking illustrations capture the beauty and power of prehistoric artwork with remarkable precision. This luminous picture book about humanity’s shared stories is full of discoveries.” — Booklist (starred review)

“Follow the Flyway: The Marvel of Bird Migration” by Sarah Nelson — “This beautifully illustrated book, with poetic text by a St. Paul author, follows ducks, geese, herons, giant-winged pelicans, egrets, sandpipers, swans, loons and snipes as their babies begin their first migration down the majestic flyway” – St. Paul Pioneer Press

YOUNG ADULT FICTION

“Phoebe’s Diary” by Phoebe Wahl — “Filled with sprawling, detailed drawings and comics panels and replete with references to early aughts indie culture, this vividly captures the voice of a teen curious about herself and her future, all in an intimate tone, as if talking to a friend unabashed about what’s on her mind.”―Booklist

“A Thousand Boy Kisses” by Tillie Cole — “One kiss lasts a moment. But a thousand kisses can last a lifetime. One boy. One girl. A bond that is forged in an instant and cherished for a decade. A bond that neither time nor distance can break. A bond that will last forever. Or so they believe. When seventeen-year-old Rune Kristiansen returns from his native Norway to the sleepy town of Blossom Grove, Georgia, where he befriended Poppy Litchfield as a child, he has just one thing on his mind. Why did the girl who was one half of his soul, who promised to wait faithfully for his return, cut him off without a word of explanation? Rune’s heart was broken two years ago when Poppy fell silent. But when he discovers the truth of her absence, he finds that the greatest heartache is yet to come”– Baker & Taylor

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

“A First Time for Everything: A True Story” by Dan Santat — “[A] relatable story of self-discovery… the perfect balance of humor and poignancy.” ―Kirkus, starred review

“Hockey Girl Loves Drama Boy” by Faith Erin Hicks — “With a keen eye, Hicks (Ride On) delivers a heartfelt graphic novel that is both a perceptive subversion of gender roles and a remarkable tale of unexpected friendship, personal growth, and the transformative power of embracing one’s true self. “―Publishers Weekly, starred review

“How I Survived 4 Nights on Ice” by Serapio Ittusardjuat — “This graphic novel is gripping, and I was drawn in almost immediately…This book speaks to not only the importance of self-sufficiency, but also traditional lifestyle knowledge; something that was often stamped out by colonizers with residential schooling and legislation pointedly destroying cultural knowledge.”―The Tiny Activists

“Huda F Cares” by Huda Fahmy — “Comedic and poignant, Fahmy’s narrative captures universal feelings of fluctuating confidence and self-deprecation, the ups and downs of family dynamics, and the growing awareness of siblings’ humanity outside the family unit. The cartoonlike, full-color artwork is dynamic, with simplified features that accentuate facial expressions. Delightfully heartwarming.” —Kirkus

“Turtle Bread” by Kim-Joy — “When Yan stumbles upon Baking Club her social anxiety tries to keep her away, but the bakers encourage her to come out of her shell, especially the caring and supportive Bea, and soon Yan discovers her new friends may need her too.” — Baker & Taylor

“Victory Stand! Raising My Fist for Justice” by Tommie Smith — “In his phenomenal graphic memoir, “Victory. Stand! Raising My Fist for Justice,” Smith teams up with the award-winning author Derrick Barnes to tell his own riveting story of balancing athletic prowess and social activism. . . . Anyabwile’s stirring black-and-white illustrations propel this magnificently paced story, and underscore the infuriating professional repercussions of Smith’s activism. . . . Timely and timeless, Smith’s “Victory. Stand!” is a must read not just for sports fans but for everyone.” ― New York Times Book Review

“Where is Anne Frank” by Ari Folman — “Bringing to life Kitty, Anne Frank’s imaginary friend to whom she addressed her diary, this graphic novel, told from a unique perspective, recounts the complete story of Anne Frank’s life, while in the present day, Kitty discovers the true meaning of Anne Frank’s legacy.” — Atlas Publishing

YOUNG ADULT NON-FICTION

“The Lemon Tree: An Arab, A Jew, and the Heart of the Middle East” by Sandy Tolen — “Tolan weaves together dramatically different perceptions of the conflict and its context and explains how the lemon tree grew to become a powerful symbol of home.” ―NPR.or