Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – DECEMBER 2023

ADULT FICTION

“At Home on Marigold Lane” by Debbie Mason — “Returning to Highland Falls after a disastrous divorce, family and marriage therapist Brianna MacLeod is reunited with her first love who sets out to convince her that risking her heart again might give them exactly what they both need–a second chance.” — Baker & Taylor

“Chain-Gang All-Stars” by Nana Kwame Adjel-Brenyah — “Like Orwell’s 1984 and Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, Adjei-Brenyah’s book presents a dystopian vision so…illuminating that it should permanently shift our understanding of who we are and what we’re capable of doing.” —The Washington Post

“Children of Memory” by Adrian Tchaikovsky — “On Imir, Captain Holt founded a new colony on an empty world. In the process, he created hope and a new future for humanity. But generations later, his descendants are struggling to survive. … explorers from the stars had arrived in secret to help this lost outpost. Confident of their superior technology, and overseen by the all-knowing construct of Doctor Avrana Kern, they begin to study their long-lost cousins from Earth. Yet the planet hides deeper mysteries. It seems the visitors aren’t the only watchers. And when the starfarers discover the scale of their mistake, it will be far too late to escape.” — ONIX Annotations

“Emily Wilde’s Encyclopedia of Faeries” by Heather Fawcett —
“Emily herself is delightful, brilliant but flawed, and often darkly funny. Her frustration with her feckless but charming colleague Wendell Bambleby is the perfect spark, and the romance is light but hits surprisingly hard when it chooses to.”—The New York Times (Editors’ Choice)

“In Search of Lost Time: In the Shadow of Young Girls in Flower: A Graphic Novel” by Marcel Proust adapted by Stanislas Brezet and Stephane Heuet –“…the second volume portrays the narrator’s foray into adolescence, set in the opulent seaside resort of Balbec. Preserving Proust’s original dissection of the spontaneity of youth, translator Laura Marris captures the narrator’s infatuation with his playmates-his memories of their intoxicating afternoons together unfolding as if in a dream. Featuring some of Proust’s most memorable characters-from mysterious Charlus to beguiling young Albertine-this second volume becomes a necessary companion piece for any lover of modern literature.” — ONIX Annotations

“River Sing Me Home” by Eleanor Shearer — “[T]he heart of the novel lies in its celebration of motherhood and female resilience. This is a tender exploration of one woman’s courage in the face of unbelievable cruelty.”
The Observer

“Slaughter House-Five (Graphic Novel Adaption)” by Kurt Vonnegut adapted by Ryan North and Albert Monteys — “Slaughterhouse-Five, an American classic, is one of the world’s great antiwar books. Centering on the infamous World War II firebombing of Dresden, the novel is the result of what Kurt Vonnegut described as a twenty-three-year struggle to write a book about what he had witnessed as an American prisoner of war…” — Amazon.com

“System Collapse” by Martha Wells — “…ART’s crew and the humans from Preservation are worried that Murderbot is facing a System Collapse-just when they need to protect a newly colonized planet from the Barish-…” — LIBRARY JOURNAL, c2023

“The Bee Sting” by Paul Murray — “Murray’s latest is a comedy of errors, emphasis on both the comedy and the errors. The novel follows the reversal of fortunes of the Barnes family, a decline sparked by the Irish financial crash, yes, but perhaps set in motion by fateful moments in the family’s past.” ―The New York Times

“The Echo of Old Books” by Barbara David — “Rare-book dealer Ashlyn Greer’s affinity for books extends beyond the intoxicating scent of old paper, ink, and leather. She can feel the echoes of the books’ previous owners—an emotional fingerprint only she can read. When Ashlyn discovers a pair of beautifully bound volumes that appear to have never been published, her gift quickly becomes an obsession. Not only is each inscribed with a startling incrimination, but the authors, Hemi and Belle, tell conflicting sides of a tragic romance.” — Baker & Taylor

“The Fragile Thread of Power” by V. E. Schwab — “Schwab cleverly builds on her existing worlds, introducing new threats and expanding the magic system. The new characters captivate and the plot twists shock.” ―Publishers Weekly

“The Future” by Naomi Alderman — “The book’s most impressive quality is its vivid, tactile imagination of our ultra-computerized future…Alderman’s encyclopedic knowledge of everything from cryptographic history to biblical hermeneutics lends the novel a savvy, scholarly gravitas.” —New York Times Book Review

“The Reformatory” by Tananarive Due — “A gripping, page-turning novel set in Jim Crow Florida that follows Robert Stephens Jr. as he s sent to a segregated reform school that is a chamber of terrors where he sees the horrors of racism and injustice, for the living, and the dead.” — Publisher Annotation:

“The Wishing Game” by Meg Shaffer — “Shaffer blends tragedy and triumph in a whimsical and gratifying debut about what makes a family. This is wish fulfillment in the best way.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Watership Down: The Graphic Novel” by Richard Adams adapted by James Sturm and Joe Sutphin — “A beautiful and faithful graphic novel adaptation of Richard Adams’s beloved story of a group of rabbits on an epic journey in search of home.” — Random House, Inc.

“Welcome Home Stranger” by Kate Christensen — “A deeply endearing story about confronting one’s past and constructing a new future—under extreme duress . . . . Welcome Home, Stranger . . . arrives at the most lovely ending of a novel I’ve read all year.” — The Washington Post

“Yellowface” by R. F. Kuang — “After the death of her literary rival in a freak accident, author June Hayward steals her just-finished masterpiece, sending it to her agent as her own work, but as emerging evidence threatens her success, she discovers just how far she’ll go to keep what she thinks she deserves.” — Atlas Publishing

ADULT MYSTERY

“Blood Lines” by Nelson and Alex DeMille — “..Special Agent Scott Brody, a wise-cracking and irreverent investigator out of central casting, and his partner, the milder Maggie Taylor, are sent to Berlin to investigate the murder of a colleague whose very presence in Germany is something of a mystery. While the German authorities attribute the agent’s murder to Islamic terrorism, Scott and Maggie discover something far more sinister: a eugenics-fueled conspiracy. Though descriptions of the political intrigue tend to drag on, there are also striking twists and a cinematic finale with Odin revealed and the evil exposed. Readers can relish a beautifully written narrative that displays the crushing power of the past.” — Don Crinklaw. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2023.

“Duel to the Death” by J. A. Jance — “Settling into a quieter life a decade after a career scandal, a once-high profile newscaster is approached by someone from her past who compels her to choose between helping and jeopardizing her future.” — Atlas Publishing

“No Strangers Here” by Carlene O’Connor — “Set in Ireland’s striking, rugged countryside, Carlene O’Connor’s dark, atmospheric new crime fiction series combines the eerie atmosphere of Tana French and Louise Penny with the compulsively taut plotting of Dervla McTiernan and Lucy Foley, as an Irish veterinarian grapples with life, death, family dynamics, and the secrets at the heart of her small community…” — Publisher Annotation:

“Robert B. Parker’s Blood Feud” by Mike Lupica — “Robert B. Parker’s iconic and irresistible PI Sunny Randall is back, and the stakes are higher than ever as she races to protect her ex-husband–and his Mafia family–from the vengeful plan of a mysterious rival. Sunny Randall is “on” again with Richie, the ex-husband she never stopped loving and never seemed to be able to let go, despite her discomfort with his Mafia connections. …” — ONIX Annotations

“Robert B. Parker’s Fallout” by Mike Lupica — “When two seemingly unconnected mysterious deaths occur on his watch, police chief Jesse Stone must pull out all the stops to unravel the truth and stop a killer from striking again.” — Publisher Annotation:

“The A List” by J. A. Jance — “Settling into a quieter life a decade after a career scandal, a once-high-profile newscaster is approached by someone from her past who compels her to make a difficult choice.” — Atlas Publishing

“The Frozen River” by Ariel Lawhon — “The narrator of Ariel Lawhon’s The Frozen River is another stalwart heroine. . .detailed descriptions of the routines of village life give this narrative its intimate sense of connection — and set [the narrator] up for a pivotal confrontation.” –-The New York Times Book Review

“The Only One Left” by Riley Sager — “Propulsive … a dizzying Gothic whodunit.” —New York Times Book Review

“The Secret” by Lee and Andrew Child — “In 1992, when eight respectable, upstanding people are found dead across the US, Jack Reacher, assigned as the Army’s representative, must discover the link between these victims and who killed them, navigating around the ulterior motives and deciding if he should bring the bad guys to justice the official way—or his way.” — Atlas Publishing

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“Can’t You Just Get Over It: A Memoir” by Angela Kehler — “A coming-of-age memoir set against the backdrop of isolation and extreme belief. A bit of cult intrigue, abuse survival, and an unlikely love story.” — Amazon.com

“Horse-Drawn Yogurt: Stories from a Total Loss Farm” by Peter Gould — “Total Loss Farm in Guilford, Vermont, was and is a wordy place. Its hilly acres and flimsy buildings provided a refuge from a riven country, a place to grow paragraphs and stanzas, among the tilled rows of the market garden. … Peter left the farm to pursue love and work. In Horse-Drawn Yogurt, Peter returns to offer his take on how we lived in times that seem exotic, yet oddly familiar…” — Amazon.com

“My Name is Barbra” by Barbara Streisband — “A 970-page victory lap past all who ever doubted, diminished or dissed her. . . . Exuberant and glorious. . . . There are just so many scintillating Streisands to contemplate over so many years: singer, actress, director, producer, philanthropist, activist, lover, mother, wife, friend, autobiographer.” —Alexandra Jacobs, New York Times Book Review

“The Best Minds: A Story of Friendship, Madness and the Tragedy of Good Intentions” by Jonathan Rosen– “Acclaimed author Jonathan Rosen’s haunting investigation of the forces that led his closest childhood friend, Michael Laudor, from the heights of brilliant promise to the forensic psychiatric hospital where he has lived since killing the woman he loved. A story about friendship, love, and the price of self-delusion, The Best Minds explores the ways in which we understand—and fail to understand—mental illness.” — Amazon.com

“The Morse Code: Legacy of a Vermont Sportswriter” by Brendan Buckley
— “… chronicles the life of a veteran sports editor whose contributions to the youth of a small community echo across the Green Mountains today. He was a widely respected reporter, and an ever-willing conversationalist, yet few readers know of his obstacles in life. Dave Morse overcame trauma and heartbreak and was admired for his empathy, kindness, and generosity.” — Amazon.com

ADULT NON-FICTION

“A Northern Gardener’s Guide to Native Plants and Pollinators: Creating Habitat in the Northeast, Great Lakes, and Upper Midwest” by Lorraine Johnson and Sheila Colla — “If you’re a gardener (or aspiring gardener) in the Northeast, Upper Midwest, or Great Lakes region, this beautiful 4-color guide will become your go-to reference to the most beneficial plants in your area. It includes profiles of more than 300 native plants, featuring lovely illustrations and photos, information on blooming periods, exposure, soil moisture, and good plant companions, as well as how each species supports specific pollinators.” — Amazon.com

“Chaat: Recipes from the Kitchens, Markets and Railways of India” by Maneet Chauhan & Jody Eddy — “A sumptuous whistle-stop tour of India’s diverse food ways. Maneet has penned a love letter to the best of Indian food.” —Padma Lakshmi, host and executive producer of Top Chef and Taste the Nation

“Engines: The Inner Workings of Machines that Move the World” by Theodore W. Gray — “… Theodore Gray explores how everyday things work in great detail, going so far as to build some of them himself . . . What Gray did in his previous books about elements, molecules, and reactions, he has now done for the mechanical systems that run our world, and the result is a beautiful appreciation for systems we all often overlook.”―Ars Technica

“Fighting for Space: Two Pilots and their Historic Battle for Female Spaceflight” by Amy Shira Teitel — “Breathtaking…If you come to this book without any knowledge of the nascent days of spaceflight, Teitel’s writing will immediately immerse you in this foreign landscape, making you feel like you’re experiencing the personal journeys of these remarkable characters right alongside them. If you do have a knowledge of many of the events, her writing will likely only deepen whatever your opinion was going into the story.”―Forbes

“For the Love of Vermont: The Lyman Orton Collection” by Anita Rafeel — “… the book tells the story of how Orton assembled the collection over many years while still running The Vermont Country Store. It is also packed with photographs of the paintings, as well as stories of the artists and their love of Vermont.” — Bennington Museum

“India is Broken: A People Betrayed, Independence to Today” by Ashoka Mody — “A provocative new account of how India moved relentlessly from its hope-filled founding in 1947 to the dramatic economic and democratic breakdowns of today.” — Perseus Publishing

“Oscar Wars: A History of Hollywood in Gold, Sweat, and Tears” by Michael Schulman — “Chronicling the remarkable, sprawling history of the Academy Awards and the personal dramas that have played out on the stage and off camera, this entertaining exploration of the Oscars features a star-studded cast of some of the most powerful Hollywood players of today and yesterday.” — Baker & Taylor

“Prequel: An American Fight Against Fascism” by Rachel Maddow– “Maddow’s book is a ripping read—well rendered, fast-paced and delivered with the same punch and assurance that she brings to a broadcast. . . . Prequel is a valuable window into the authoritarian mind-set—and the process by which self-professed patriots turn against democracy . . . the parallels to the present day are strong, even startling . . .”—The New York Times

“Quick and Legal Will Book” by Denis Clifford — “The most streamlined, yet thorough information available on how to write a valid will quickly and safely without a lawyer.” — Long Beach Press-Telegram

“Sailing True North: Ten Admirals and the Voyage of Character” by Admiral James Stavridis — “[An] earnest mixture of biography, memoir, and pop psychology . . . readers will absorb some significant naval history . . . Stavridis, the former Supreme Allied Commander at NATO and current chairman of the U.S. Naval Institute, has done his research in the works of popular historians . . . [These] biographies make good reading.” —Kirkus

“Some People Need Killing: A Memoir of Murder in My Country” by Patricia Evangelista — “Evangelista makes us feel the fear and grief that she felt as she chronicled what Duterte was doing to her country. But appealing to our emotions is only part of it; what makes this book so striking is that she wants us to think about what happened, too. She pays close attention to language, and not only because she is a writer. Language can be used to communicate, to deny, to threaten, to cajole. Duterte’s language is coarse and degrading. Evangelista’s is evocative and exacting.”—The New York Times

“Souls of the Black Folk: A Graphic Interpretation” by W. E. B. du Bois, adapted by Paul Peart-Smith — “The preeminent Black intellectual of his generation, Du Bois wrote about the trauma of seeing the Reconstruction era’s promise of racial equality cruelly dashed by the rise of white supremacist terror and Jim Crow laws. Yet he also argued for the value of African American cultural traditions and provided inspiration for countless civil rights leaders who followed him. Now artist Paul Peart-Smith offers the first graphic adaptation of Du Bois’s seminal work.” — Amazon.com

“The Half Known Life: In Search of Paradise” by Pico Iyer — “Reading Mr. Iyer’s book in the depth of winter, in a troubled world, it’s heartening to think that paradise—or at least a glimpse of it—might be available from where we sit.” –Wall Street Journal

“The Iliad” by Homer translated by Emily Wilson — “The culmination of a decade of intense engagement with antiquity’s most surpassingly beautiful and emotionally complex poetry, Wilson’s Iliad now gives us a complete Homer for our generation.” — Amazon.com

“The Rediscovery of America: Native Peoples and the Unmaking of American History” by Ned Blackhawk — “Even as the telling of American history has become more complex and nuanced, Native Americans tend to be absent. Blackhawk, a professor at Yale, confronts that absence in this sweeping account of how Native Americans shaped the country legally, politically, and culturally.”—Washington Post

“The Undertow: Scenes from the a Slow Civil War” by Jeff Sharlet — “Poetic descriptions of America’s landscape and history punctuate Sharlet’s unsettling insights into the undercurrents of fear, isolation, and anger coursing through the country. It’s a jaw-dropping portrait of a country on the edge.” ― Publishers Weekly

“The Vegan Chinese Kitchen: Recipes and Modern Stories from a Thousand-Year-Old Tradition” by Hannah Che — “Through stunning photography, stories and recipes, the creator of The Plant-Based Wok draws upon a fascinating subset of Chinese cookery that emphasizes umami-rich ingredients and can be traced back over centuries to Buddhist temple kitchens to introduce readers to a whole world of flavors and ingredients.” — Atlas Publishing

“The Wager: A Tale of Shipwreck, Mutiny and Murder” by David Grann — “The most gripping sea-yarn I’ve read in years….A tour de force of narrative nonfiction. Mr. Grann’s account show how storytelling, whether to judges or readers, can shape individual and national fortunes – as well as our collective memories.” — Wall Street Journal 

“The Wisdom of our Hands: Crafting, a Life” by Doug Stowe — “Woodworking craftsman and educator Doug Stowe makes a passionate case for reintegrating mind and body in both education and life in his new book The Wisdom of Our Hands: Crafting, A Life.“—Australian Wood Review

“Tools: A Visual Exploration of Implements and Devices in the Workshop” by Theodore W. Gray — “Similar in format to a woodland field guide, each entry provides high-quality color photos by Nick Mann and concise, thoughtful, explanations of history, design, and function. Gray’s attitude about tools is candid and frequently playful. . . . Although unquestionably authoritative, it does not take itself too seriously, and the author’s droll humor will help even the most timid workshop novice get comfortable with tools.” ― Booklist

War at Sea: A Shipwrecked History from Antiquity to the Twentieth Century” by James P. Delgado — “A detailed and well-documented global tour of the history of lost warships over 3,000 years of prehistory and history . . . an incredible piece of research by one of the pioneers of underwater cultural studies . . . a masterpiece that will be a benchmark for understanding the significance of shipwreck history for decades to come.”- The Naval Historical Foundation

“What an Owl Knows: The New Science of the World’s Most Enigmatic Birds” by Jennifer Ackerman — “[Ackerman] offers an absorbing ear-tuft-to-tail appreciation of the raptor that Mary Oliver, a poet, called a ‘god of plunge and blood.’ Owls, it seems, know a lot. Ms. Ackerman draws on recent research to explain what and how.” —The Economist

BLUE/DVD MOVIES

“Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny”

BOARD BOOK

“Little Blue Truck’s Christmas” by Alice Schertle

PICTURE BOOK

“A Delicious Story” by Barney Saltzberg
“A Family Like Ours” by Frank Murphy
“A Head Full of Birds” by Alexandra Garibal
“A Practical Present for Philippa Pheasant” by Briony May Smith
“Bright Winter Night” by Alli Brydon
“Don’t Worry, Wuddles” by Lita Judge
“Fix and Stitch” by Barbara Naas
“Frank and Bert” by Chris Naylor-Ballesteros
“From Here to There: A First Book of Maps” by Vivian French
“Hello, Mister Blue” by Daria Peoples
“If I Was a Horse” by Sophie Blackall
“Just Like Grandma” by Kim Rogers
“Merlina and the Magical Mishap” by Daniela Drescher
“Nell Plants a Tree” by Anne Wynter
“Over and Under the Waves” by Kate Messner
“Remember” by Joy Harjo
“Runaway Pond” by Nancy Price Graff
“Say My Name” by Joanna Ho
“Stacy’s Remarkable Books” by Stacey Abrams
“The Artivist” by Nikkolas Smith
“The Book from Far Away” by Bruce Handy
“The Christmas Book Flood” by Emily Kilgore
“The Family Tree” by Sean Dixon
“The Storytellers Rule” by Christy Mandin
“This Book is Banned” by Raj Jaldar
“Too Much! An Overwhelming Day” by Jolene Guiterrez
“We, the Curious Ones” by Marion Dane Bauer
“What Can You Do with a Rock?” by Pat Zietlow Miller
“Wheels: The Big Fun Book of Vehicles” by Tom Schamp
“Winter: A Solstice Story” by Kelsey Ebben Gross

EASY READER

“Bramble and Maggie: Snowy Day” by Jessie Haas
“Cornbread & Poppy” by Mathew Cordell
“Fergus and Zeke” by Kate Messner


JUVENILE BIOGRAPHY

“The Girl Heard the Music: How One Pianist and 85,000 Bottles and Cans Brought New Hope to an Island” by Marni Fogelson and Mahani Teave — ” Accompanied by vibrant, delightful visuals, this upbeat and fascinating story will leave readers feeling as though they, too, can make a difference when it comes to helping the planet.” ― Kirkus Reviews

“The Little Books of the Little Brontes” by Sara O’Leary and Briony May Smith — “In a deeply sensitive work, O’Leary (Gemma and the Giant Girl) and Smith (The Mermaid Moon) focus on the diminutive volumes that Charlotte, Anne, Emily, and Branwell Brontë made for each other as children living in austere circumstances.” —STARRED REVIEW, Publishers Weekly

JUVENILE DVD

“Oddball”

JUVENILE FICTION

“A Sky Full of Song” by Susan Lynn Meyer — “In 1905 North Dakota, eleven-year-old Russian immigrant Shoshana is bullied for being Jewish, but after listening to the music of her homeland, she is reminded of the resilience and traditions her people have brought all the way to the prairie” — Baker & Taylor

“As Long as the Lemon Tree Grows” by Zoulfa Katouh — “Katouh’s lyrical prose, combined with a moving portrayal of first love, unflinchingly depicts both the costs of revolution, and the strength it takes to fight for one’s beliefs.”―Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Attack of the Black Rectangles” by Amy Sarig King –“Mystical, fablelike… just right for a sensitive sixth-grader with a growing self- and world awareness trying to navigate the troubled waters of uncertain friendships and demeaning bullying. A finely wrought, magical coming-of-age tale with a convincing message.” — Kirkus Reviews

Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Chalice of the Gods” by Rick Riordan — “Percy Jackson’s hope for a normal senior year is shattered as the gods present him with three quests, beginning with the retrieval of Zeus’s goblet, in order to get the necessary three letters of recommendation for college.” — Baker & Taylor

“Remember Us” by Jacqueline Woodson — “Exceptional. . . . Written in lyrical prose, Remember Us is a poetic time capsule from the 12-year-old Sage, an African American girl living in the Bushwick section of Brooklyn during the 1970s. . . . What struck me about this novel was not only its commemoration of those horrific Bushwick fires . . . but also how Woodson conjures such a captivating, elegiac story from their ashes. . . . Will help tweens process their grief after trauma.” —The New York Times Book Review

“The Skull” by Jon Klassen — “Jon Klassen’s signature wry humor takes a turn for the ghostly in this thrilling retelling of a traditional Tyrolean folktale. …The Skull is as empowering as it is mysterious and foreboding.” — Publisher Annotation:

“The Storyteller” by Brandon Hobson — “From National Book Award finalist Brandon Hobson, a kaleidoscopic middle-grade adventure that mixes the anxieties, friendships, and wonders of a Cherokee boy’s life with Cherokee history and lore.” — Amazon.com

“The Swallowtail Legacy: Wreck at Ada’s Reef” by Michael D. Bell — “Fans of mystery will enjoy how Lark goes all out to solve this case. . . . Main characters are well fleshed out, and the author does a wonderful job of bringing this island and its inhabitants to life. . . . An entertaining mystery for fans of Sammy Keyes and Nancy Drew about family, loss, and the importance of ­friendship.”—School Library Journal

“Yonder” by Ali Standish — “Set in small-town Appalachia during WWII, Standish’s (The Mending Summer) uplifting mystery tackles big themes of abuse, bullying, heroism, mental health, and prejudice…Through an elegant voice and a series of flashbacks, the mystery of Jack’s disappearance unfolds alongside the story of Danny’s friendship with him, the increasing clarity with which Danny sees life as far from perfect, and the small but meaningful steps he takes to discover what bravery means.” — Publishers Weekly (starred review)

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Cat Kid: Comic Book Influencers” by Dav Pilkey — “Cat Kid Comic Club is back in session in this groundbreaking graphic novel narrative by Dav Pilkey, the worldwide bestselling and award-winning author and illustrator of Dog Man.” — Amazon.com

JUVENILE NON-FICTION

“Chinese Menu: The History, Myths, and Legends Behind Your Favorite Foods” by Grace Lin — “Newbery and Caldecott honoree and New York Times bestselling author Grace Lin delivers a groundbreaking, lushly illustrated, and beautifully written full-color book that explores the whimsical myths and stories behind your favorite American Chinese food.” — Publisher’s Annotation

“Colonization and the Wampanoag Story: Race to the Truth” by Linda Coombs — “When you think about the beginning of the American story, what comes to mind? Three ships in 1492, or perhaps buckled hats and shoes stepping off of the Mayflower, ready to start a new country. But the truth is, Christopher Columbus, the Pilgrims, and the Colonists didn’t arrive to a vast, empty land ready to be developed. They arrived to find people and communities living in harmony with the land they had inhabited for thousands of years, and they quickly disrupted everything they saw” — Publisher’s Annotation

“Different Kinds of Minds: A Guide to Your Brain” by Temple Grandin — “The author, with her knack for making science easy to understand, explains different types of thinkers and how all minds need to work together to create solutions to help solve real-world problems. Simultaneous eBook. Illustrations.” — Atlas Publishing

“Dogs: A History of Our Best Friends” by Lita Judge — “A tail-wagging tribute. The heartwarming narrative is more than matched by the intense appeal of the cheery, alert, eminently pettable looking four-legged cast in the illustrations. Sweeter than a scratch behind the ears.”―Kirkus Reviews

“History Smashers; Christopher Columbus and the Taino People” by Kate Messner and Jose Barreiro — “…Columbus never actually set foot in what is now the United States. His voyages took him to islands in the Caribbean and along the coast of South America. The truth is, when Columbus first arrived, Indigenous peoples, including the Taino, had been living there for thousands of years, raising their families, running their societies, and trading with their neighbors. He didn’t “discover” the lands at all! And his name? Not even really Christopher Columbus!”– Baker & Taylor

“How to Build a Human: In Seven Evolutionary Steps” by Pamela S. Turner — “An acclaimed science writer breaks down human evolution into seven important steps, in this funny and fascinating book vetted by experts at the Smithsonian’s Human Origins Program.” — Atlas Publishing

“So You Want to Be a Frog: Everything There is to Know about Frogs!” by Jane Porter — “Fabio Frog gives readers the scoop on how they can be fabulous frogs…and a clever dose of frog facts to boot. . . . Fabio breaks down the 10 rules of being a frog and encourages readers to attempt many, giving them kudos for the skills that humans will have an easier time handling. . . Croaking, frog paleontology, keeping cool, and eating habits are also covered along with some random facts that are sure to amaze and astound any audience.” —Kirkus Reviews

“The Astronaut’s Guide to Leaving the Planet” by Terry Virts — “In this exciting book, a former NASA astronaut inspires the next generation of space travelers with answers to all kids’ questions on how people become astronauts, how they prepare for space travel, and what it’s like to live and work in space.” — Grand Central Publishing

“The Handbook of Forgotten Skills: Timeless Fun for a New Generation” by Elaine Batiste and Natalie Crowley — “An illustrated step-by-step guide to classic fun and handy skills for a new generation….Each chapter includes clear, illustrated step-by-step instructions as well as information about the history of that skill. For example, did you know that lemonade is credited with helping fight the plague in Paris? Or that paper airplanes became popular during World War II because traditional toys weren’t available?” — Publisher’s Annotation

“The Kid’s Book of Elements: An Awesome Introduction to Every Known Atom in the Universe” by Theodore Gray — “In this very special kids edition of Theodore Gray’s The Elements, budding scientists, ages 6 to 9, will learn all about every element in the periodic table from the first element, Hydrogen (1), to the very last element, Oganesson (118). Filled with great big colorful photographs and fun facts for every element, The Kid’s Book of The Elements is the perfect introduction to the fascinating world of chemistry and visual/tactile-based STEM/STEAM learning.” — Grand Central Publishing

“What Goes on Inside a Beaver Pond?” by Becky Cushing Gap — “… What Goes on inside a Beaver Pond? takes kids ages 8 to 10 on a journey through a year in the life of a young beaver (called a “kit”). Throughout the seasons, vibrant illustrations and descriptions reveal the hidden inner-workings of a beaver lodge, how beavers fell trees with their teeth and create a wetland habitat, how they collect food and ward off predators, and what daily life is like within a beaver colony”– Baker & Taylor

“What the Eagle Sees: Indigenous Stories Rebellion and Renewal” by Eldon Yellowhorn — “What do people do when their civilization is invaded? Indigenous people have been faced with disease, war, broken promises, and forced assimilation. Despite crushing losses and insurmountable challenges, they formed new nations from the remnants of old ones, they adopted new ideas and built on them, they fought back, and they kept their cultures alive. When the only possible “victory” was survival, they survived.” — Publisher’s Annotation

“What’s Inside a Caterpillar Cocoon? And Other Questions about Moths and Butterflies” by Rachel Igntofsky — “With warm and heart-fluttering illustrations, discover the next nonfiction picture book about butterflies and moths from the creator of the New York Times bestseller Women in Science! Butterflies soar in the sunlight. While moths flutter under the moon and stars. Find out more about these mysterious and majestic insects — Publisher Annotation

“What a Map Can Do” by Gabrielle Balkan — “An accessible and humorous introduction to maps for budding navigators. A raccoon narrator embarks on a big adventure in this exciting exploration of maps for the youngest readers. Traditional maps of cities, roads, and parks are joined by some less conventional ones such as inside the body, each one methodically introduced with humor and clear explanation. A clever, colorful, and engaging first look at constructing and decoding maps.” — Publisher Annotation

“Wombats are Pretty Weird: A [not so] Serious Guide” by Abi Cushman — “[An] informative field guide that professes not to take itself too seriously . . . Adorable, cartoonish illustrations of all three kinds of wombat, a snake sidekick named Joey (just like a baby wombat), and speech-bubble dialogue lend a layer of humor and reinforce the concepts introduced by the text.” — Booklist

YOUNG ADULT FICTION

“Gather” by Kenneth M. Cadow — “A resourceful teenager in rural Vermont struggles to hold on to the family home while his mom recovers from addiction in this striking debut novel.” — Amazon.com

“Murtagh: World of Eragon” by Christopher Paolini — “Master storyteller and internationally bestselling author Christopher Paolini returns to the World of Eragon in this stunning epic fantasy set a year after the events of the Inheritance Cycle. Join Dragon Rider—and fan favorite—Murtagh and his dragon as they confront a perilous new enemy! The world is no longer safe for the Dragon Rider Murtagh and his dragon, Thorn. An evil king has been toppled, and they are left to face the consequences of the reluctant role they played in his reign of terror. Now they are hated and alone, exiled to the outskirts of society.” —Publisher Annotation:

“The Marrow Thieves” by Cherie Dimaline — “Just when you think you have nothing left to lose, they come for your dreams. Humanity has nearly destroyed its world through global warming, but now an even greater evil lurks. The Indigenous people of North America are being hunted and harvested for their bone marrow, which carries the key to recovering something the rest of the population has lost: the ability to dream. In this dark world, Frenchie and his companions struggle to survive as they make their way up north to the old lands. For now, survival means staying hidden – but what they don’t know is that one of them holds the secret to defeating the marrow thieves.” — ONIX Annotations

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – NOVEMBER 2023

ADULT FICTION

“A Council of Dolls” by Mona Susan Power — “Power’s deep knowledge of Indigenous history comes through in keen depictions of the Indian schools, and she illuminates the characters’ struggles with generation trauma, which arise as they try to sustain their co”nnections to the past. This story of survival shines brightly.” — Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Against the Loveless World” by Susan Ajulhawa — “[A]t its heart, Abulhawa’s novel is a love story . . . but this is a love story that cannot escape its geography, and Abulhawa elegantly crafts a world where the tension between desire and survival is laid bare.” ― New Yorker

“Barn 8” by Deb Olin Unferth — “Kaleidoscopic. . . . Unferth’s lens, which telescopes through time and space, is unafraid to linger on the bizarre and vicious cycle of birth-death, need-fulfillment and supply-demand that this phantom-run barn universe perpetuates. . . . Yet Unferth never traffics in gratuitous shock. Instead, her sentences and constantly shifting point of view are embroidered with a great deal of unexpected tenderness and optimism.”―Los Angeles Times

“Blackouts” by Justin Torres — “The supreme pleasure of [Blackouts] is its slow obliteration of any firm idea of reality―a perfect metaphor for the delirious disorientation that comes with learning queer history as an adult . . . Torres haunts this book full of ghosts like a ghost himself, and with this novel, he has passed the haunting on, creating the next link in a queer chain from Jan to Juan to nene to you.”―Hugh Ryan, The New York Times Book Review

“Day” by Michael Cunningham — “Michael Cunningham writes such eloquent, seductive sentences that we have to keep reminding ourselves to step back and pay attention to his appealing, dimensional characters and to his generous vision of childhood and adulthood, of work and love, of the pleasures and griefs of family life, and of all the rich complexities of being human.”—Francine Prose

“Holly” by Stephen King — “What makes King’s work so much more frightening than that of most other suspense writers, what elevates it to night-terror levels, isn’t his cruelty to his characters: It’s his kindness.” —Flynn Berry, New York Times Book Review

“In Another Time” by Jillian Cantor — “Cantor elevates love as a powerful force that transcends tragedy and shows how music speaks to even the cruelest hearts. [In Another Time is] a powerful story that exalts the strength of the human spirit.” — Kirkus

“Lilacs in the Dust Bowl” by Diana Stevan — “Heart-wrenching and uplifting saga. This series is a compelling, inspiring story of an immigrant family’s trials and tribulations. It follows Lukia Mazurets’ journey just before (and during) the Great Depression, as she and her children migrate from the Ukraine to North America. It is so well told and moving, and the detailed landscape made me feel right in the story.” — Martha Conway, author of The Physician’s Daughter

“Let Us Descend” by Jesmyn Ward — “Superb . . . Angry, beautiful, raw, visceral, and heartfelt, Let Us Descend is the literary equivalent of an open wound from which poetry pours. . . . Ward has taken Black history in a time of racial and political turmoil and used it to scream about grief and injustice, but also about beauty, queer love, history, determination, and joy.” —NPR

“Night Watch” by Jayne Anne Phillips — “Gorgeous prose, attention to detail, and masterful characters . . . Set in West Virginia during and after the Civil War, Phillips’ book takes as given that slavery was evil and the war a necessity, focusing instead on lives torn apart by the conflict and on the period’s surprisingly enlightened approach toward care of the mentally ill . . . Pitch-perfect voice . . . Haunting storytelling and a refreshing look at history.” Kirkus, starred

“Red Rabbit” by Alex Grecian — “A witch, a demon, a shapeshifter, ghosts, and cannibals are just some of the characters whose exploits enliven this sprawling, picaresque post–Civil War weird western from Grecian.” ―Publishers Weekly

“So Late in the Day: Stories of Women and Men” by Claire Keegan — “Tight, potent . . . [Keegan] has chosen her details carefully. Everything means something . . . Her details are so natural that readers might not immediately understand their significance. The stories grow richer with each read . . . [These stories] have new and powerful things to say about the ever-mystifying, ever-colliding worlds of contemporary Irish women and the men who stand in their way.” — Minneapolis Star Tribune

“Starling House” by Alix E. Harrow — “Harrow’s mash-up of twisted fairy tales and Southern gothic fiction is a haunting story of longing, lies, and generational curses.” Library Journal, starred review

“The Exchange: After the Firm” by John Grisham — “#1 New York Times bestselling author John Grisham delivers high-flying international suspense in a stunning new legal thriller that marks the return of Mitch McDeere, the brilliant hero of The Firm.” — Baker & Taylor

“Tomorrow, and Tomorrow and Tomorrow” by Gabrielle Zevin — “Woven throughout [Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow] are meditations on originality, appropriation, the similarities between video games and other forms of art, the liberating possibilities of inhabiting a virtual world, and the ways in which platonic love can be deeper and more rewarding—especially in the context of a creative partnership—than romance.” —The New Yorker

“Trust” by Hernan Diaz –“Intricate, cunning and consistently surprising…Much of the novel’s pleasure derives from its unpredictabiility…Add Henry James to Wharton, and Thomas Mann too…Exhilarating and intelligent novel.” —New York Times

ADULT MYSTERY

“12 Months to Live” by James Patterson and Mike Lupica — “An ex-NYPD beat cop, unrelenting PI and undefeated defense attorney, terminally ill Jane Smith, while knee-deep in the murder of trial of the century, is targeted by a killer who’s determined to end her life before her expiration date.” — Atlas Publishing

“Face of Greed” by James L’Etoile — “Smart-mouthed, tough, pull-no-punches Emily will do whatever it takes to solve the case, and she and Javier keep investigating until they finally uncover the tragic, shocking truth. The suspenseful, twist-a-minute, fast-moving plot . . . make[s] this an outstanding must-read.” —Booklist (Starred Review)

“From a Far and Lovely Country” by Alexander McCall Smith — “McCall Smith’s No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency is one of the most reliably entertaining cozy series running, soothingly returning readers to the tiny Botswana office of Mma Precious Ramotswe, the wise and resourceful founder of the agency that she operates with her comically snarky and over-reaching assistant, Mma Grace Makutsi, with whom she discusses detective strategy over mugs of South African red bush tea. . . . This is largely a comic novel, enlivened by Precious’ reflections, Grace’s jockeying for status, and part-time mechanic and apprentice detective Charlie’s struggles to overcome his unreliability. A total delight.” —Booklist [starred review]

“Killing Moon” by Jo Nesbo — “Readers are privy to the doings of a man calling himself Prim, who emerges as the creepiest villain this side of a Thomas Harris novel . . . Nesbø excels at manipulating this sort of ghoulish material. He can heighten suspense with a single word and wrong-foot the most attentive customer.” —Wall Street Journal

“Resurrection Walk” by Michael Connelly — “A stunning combination of police and legal procedural. . . As always, Connelly makes the tedious work of investigation fascinating as he shuttles between Mickey’s and Harry’s hard-bitten points of view.”―Booklist (starred)

“Robert B Parker’s Bad Influence” by Alison Gaylin — “Taking over the franchise for the first time, Gaylin proves the equal of Sunny’s creator in plotting….She doesn’t sound all that much like Parker; she sounds better. Gaylin brings Sunny to terms with contemporary social media even as she uncovers motives older than you can imagine.” —Kirkus Reviews

“The Collector” by Daniel Silva — “Legendary art restorer and spy Gabriel Allon joins forces with a brilliant and beautiful master-thief to track down the world’s most valuable missing painting but soon finds himself in a desperate race to prevent an unthinkable conflict between Russia and the West.” — Harper Collins

“The Girl in the Eagle’s Talons” by Karin Smirnoff — “Propulsive . . . Smirnoff adds new maturity and depth to the two leads, offers several jaw-dropping plot twists . . . Fans will find it a worthy addition to the series.”—Publishers Weekly

“The Last Devil to Die” by Richard Osman — “Osman doesn’t disappoint… Everything is here that fans of the series have come to expect: humour, warmth, the confounding of expectations as these pensioners investigate… Along with the laughs, there is grief, and an ending that is handled sensitively (I was weeping)… We all need a regular injection of the Thursday Murder Club to keep our spirits up.” — The Guardian

“The Raging Storm” by Ann Cleeves — “Cleeves crafts a devilishly intricate mystery that will surprise even seasoned genre fans, and Venn remains an appealing lead every bit as memorable as the author’s Vera Stanhope or Jimmy Perez. Cleeves’s fans and newcomers alike will be hungry for the next entry.”―Publishers Weekly (Starred Review)

“The Secret” by Lee Child — “Reacher is the stuff of myth. . . . One of this century’s most original, tantalizing pop-fiction heroes.'”—The Washington Post

“The Secret Hours” by Mick Herron — “Herron keeps up his gravity-defying balancing act: belly-laugh spy spoof on one side, elegiac state-of-the-nation satire on the other, with a thin, taut line of polished prose between.”
Financial Times

“The Spy Coast” by Tess Gerritsen — “This is a nice take on retirement―five old spooks whose bones may ache but whose minds remain sharp. You can expect mystery, action, and bloodshed in this exciting thriller launched straight from the peaceful shores of Maine.” ―Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“Unto Us a Son is Born” by Donna Leon — “Venetians love to gossip, Donna Leon advises us in Unto Us a Son Is Given, her latest mystery featuring that most compassionate of policemen, Guido Brunetti, commissario di polizia. There’s bound to be talk when Gonzalo Rodriguez de Tejeda, the rich Spanish godfather of Brunetti’s wife, Paola, adopts his lover and makes the young man his legal heir . . . This cop is neither jaded nor callous, and he has that rare quality Italians would call ‘un cuore d’oro,’ a heart of gold.”―Marilyn Stasio, New York Times Book Review

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“I’ve Been Thinking” by Daniel C. Bennett — “A delightful memoir from one of our deepest thinkers.” ― Kirkus (starred review)

“We Could Have Been Friends, My Father and I: A Palestinian Memory” by Raja Shehadeh — “Profoundly personal as well as historically significant…In his moral clarity and baring of the heart, his self-questioning and insistence on focusing on the experience of the individual within the storms of nationalist myth and hubris, Shehadeh recalls writers such as Ghassan Kanafani and Primo Levi…a quiet and deeply felt book that illustrates how being dispossessed and being occupied are not merely legal or political conditions.” —New York Times Book Review

ADULT NON-FICTION

“A City on Mars: Can We Settle Space, Should We Settle Space and Have We Really Thought This Through?” by Kelly Weinersmith — “An exceptional new piece of popular science . . . Forceful, engaging and funny . . . an essential reality check for anyone who has ever looked for home in the night sky . . . hilarious. The breezy prose is studded with charming cartoons… This book will make you happy to live on this planet — a good thing, because you’re not leaving anytime soon.” —New York Times Book Review

He/She/They: How We Talk about Gender and Why It Matters” by Schuyler Bailar — “A wonderfully clear and convincing guide to comprehending and defending gender diversity.”―Kirkus, Starred Review

“How to Know a Person: The Art of Seeing Others Deeply and Being Deeply Seen” by David Brooks — “Drawing from the fields of psychology and neuroscience and from the worlds of theater, philosophy, history and education, one of the nation’s leading writers and commentators helps us become more understanding considerate toward others, and to find the joy that comes from being seen.” — Baker & Taylor

“My Vermont Table: Recipes for All (Six) Seasons” by Gesine Bullock-Prado — “This is an utterly charming title that delivers a sense of place with its beauty and narrative, but its wow factor comes from Bullock-Prado’s recipes, which are pure Vermont.” ― Library Journal

“The Core of an Onion: Peeling the Rarest Common Food — Featuring More than 100 Historical Recipes” by Mark Kurlansky — “Featuring historical images and his own pen-and-ink drawings, and including 25 recipes from around the world, a New York Times-bestselling and James Beard Award-winning author peels back the cultural, historical and gastronomical layers of one of the world’s most beloved culinary staples.” — Atlas Publishing

“The Hundred Years” War on Palestine: A History of Settler Colonialism and Resistance, 1917-2017″ by Rashid Khalidi — “A richly informed, personalized account of a century of repression of a peoples’ national aspirations. . . . original and distinctive . . . a remarkable testament to the stubborn resistance that characterizes the Palestinians.” ―Washington Report on Middle East Affairs

“The In-Between: Unforgettable Encounters During Life’s Final Moments” by Hadley Vlahos, RN — “Tender and transformative . . . The great surprise of The In-Between is that it makes dying feel like a peaceful, dynamic, and nourishing event that can potentially transform the lives of those who are left behind. Readers will cheer on Hadley Vlahos and, like me, be forever grateful that she wrote this book.”—Christie Tate, New York Times bestselling author of Group

“The Mysteries” by Bill Watterson and John Kascht — “Bill Watterson’s return to print, after nearly three decades, comes in the form of a fable called “The Mysteries,” which shares with his famous comic strip a sense of enchantment.” (The New Yorker)

“The Sisterhood: The Secret History of Women at the CIA” by Liz Mundy — “Galvanizing . . . Brimming with startling, intriguing, and infuriating facts and insights, this arresting and suspenseful exposé is rooted in extensive interviews and research as exacting as that conducted by the brilliant women analysts Mundy profiles. . . . Every page is electric with revelations as Mundy vividly and perceptively portrays the remarkable women who covertly elevated this complicated, controversial, yet essential government agency.”Booklist (starred review)

“When Religion Hurts You: Healing from Religious Trauma and the Impact of High-Control Religion” by Laura E. Anderson — “Drawing on clinical research, stories from clients, and her own experience, an expert on religious trauma shows how readers can live as healing individuals after leaving a high-demand, high-control religious system”– Amazon.com

“Year of No Garbage: Recycling Lies, Plastic Problems, and One Woman’s Trashy Journey to Zero Waste: A Memoir” by Eve O. Schaub — “Between chicken coops, various storage containers for miscellaneous plastic, and multiple composting bins, Eve Schaub’s pandemic passion project looked a lot different than most people’s. . . . Schaub had the idea of completing an entire calendar year without throwing anything away. . . . The best-selling author has published her latest book documenting her most recent experimentation. . . . Despite the gravity of her findings, Schaub wanted readers to take away something positive from her lessons learned.” —NBC5, Vermont

PARENTING

“Growing Up in Public: Coming of Age in Digital World” by Devorah Heitner — “Astute advice on how parents can help their children navigate social media and other technology…. The levelheaded guidance is a refreshing antidote to more alarmist takes on the topic.” —Publishers Weekly

“Middle School Superpowers: Raising Resilient Tweens in Turbulent Times” by Phyllis L. Fagell — “A licensed clinical professional counselor and Washington Post education column contributor offers this practical, evidence-based and compassionate guide for parents and educators to help tweens navigate through challenging situations by providing 12 superpowers they need be confident, self-aware, independent and resilient. — Atlas Publishing

BLUE/DVD MOVIES

“Mission Impossible: Dead Reckoning”

“PICTURE BOOKS”

“Around the Table that Grandad Built” by Melanie Heiuser Hill
“Cape” by Kevin Johnson
“Dear Unicorn” by Josh Funk
“How Does Santa Go Down the Chimney?” by Mac Barnett
“I Love Strawberries” by Shannon Anderson
“Mine!” by Candace Fleming
“My Powerful Hair” by Carole Lindstrom
“Stillwater and Koo Save the World” by Jon J. Muth
“Tap! Tap! Tap! Dance! Dance! Dance!” by Herve Tullet
“The Time Machine: (Because It’s Never too Late to Apologize)” by Pauline David-Sax
“We Are Starlings: Inside the Mesmerizing Magic of Murmuration” by Robert Furros & Donna Jo Napoli
“When You Can Swim” by Jack Wong

JUVENILE BIOGRAPHIES

“Autumn Peltier, Water Warrior” by Carole Lindstrom — “From New York Times bestselling picture book author Carole Lindstrom and illustrator Bridget George comes Autumn Peltier, Water Warrior, an inspiring picture book biography about two Indigenous Rights Activists, Josephine Mandamin and Autumn Peltier.” — Publisher’s Anotation

“Christo and Jeanne-Claude Wrap the World: The Story of Two Groundbreaking Environmental Artists” by Greg Neri — “Haidle’s vivacious, stylized mixed-media illustrations underscore a sense of the duo’s energy, inquisitiveness, and determination; the visuals, which portray background characters with varying skin tones, culminate with expansive spreads depicting the couple’s remarkable, ephemeral outdoor work. . . a wonderful tribute to coupledom, collaboration, and creativity that offers conceptual thoughts about art.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review)

JUVENILE DVD MOVIES

“Spider-Man: Across the Spider Vers

JUVENILE FICTION

“Coyote Queen” by Jessica Vitalis — “Twelve-year-old Felicity Ulyssa Dahlers, “Fud,” lives in a trailer in rural Wyoming with her mom and Larry—her mom’s abusive, ex-boxer boyfriend who’s in the grip of alcoholism. . . . Scrappy Fud demonstrates admirable coping mechanisms alongside awareness she shouldn’t have to live in fear, and the book’s coyote facts and symbolism nicely bolster Fud’s survivor mentality: ‘Sometimes leaving one pack meant finding another.’ . . . An honest, slice-of-underrepresented-life story with a speculative twist.” — Booklist

“Elf Dog & Owl Head” by M. T. Anderson — “A sparkling fantasy by the ever-inventive M.T. Anderson. . . . Much of the early humor in this very funny book comes from the disjunction between ordinary human things and the astonishing stuff of elsewhere. . . . Dramatic story turns, witty dialogue and zestful monochrome drawings by Junyi Wu combine to make a reading treat for 8- to 12-year-olds.” —The Wall Street Journal

“Greenwild” The World Behind the Door” by Pari Thomson — “This charmingly detailed story is truly a garden of delights, full of danger and magic, mystery and friendship. Daisy’s thrilling adventures will sweep you into a botanical world of delightful possibilities and sinister threats, while themes of environmental conservation and community cooperation will resonate with readers of all ages.” ― Jennifer Adam, author of The Last Windwitch

“Mascot” by Charles Waters and Traci Sorrell — “The story’s catalyst is Callie, a new student who’s Cherokee and repelled by all the face painting, whooping and tomahawk-chop chanting. Seeing Callie’s discomfort, her peers variously react with defensiveness, disengagement and self-examination. Although “Mascot”’s outcome sometimes seems preordained, Waters and Sorell’s plain-spoken verse is always sharp and direct.” —The New York Times Book Review

“Odder” by Katherine Applegate — “Applegate uses strands of nonfiction detail to anchor and give stability to Odder’s fictional story, much as sea otters use lengths of kelp to hold themselves in place while they sleep. Charles Santoso’s endearing black-and-white illustrations, meanwhile, add to the buoyancy of this accessible and informative story.” ―The Wall Street Journal

“Ruby Lost and Found” by Christina Li — “What begins as an isolating and overwhelming journey through grief turns hopeful as Ruby learns that she doesn’t have to navigate change alone.” — Horn Book Magazine

“The Cricket War” by Tho Pham — “While the protagonist’s journey is plagued by trauma and upheaval, and the authors detail Phạm’s and other Vietnamese refugees’ experiences to tear-jerking effect, the creators also offer comfort via joyful interactions throughout this carefully crafted, fast-paced read.” ―Publishers Weekly

“The Hungry Place” by Jessie Haas — “Tender-hearted readers (that is, all horse-loving readers) will…cheer Rae’s persistence and faith in her dreams. Readers’ sympathetic agony is eventually replaced with tears of happiness as Haas brings the story around to a rousing happily-ever after ending.” —The Horn Book

“The Lost Library” by Rebecca Stead — “When a makeshift Little Free Library appears on the town green, almost 20 years after the mysterious fire that burned down the town library, the people of Martinville are drawn together once more to not just solve the mystery of the fire but also to decide what it means for their own fates. Mass and Stead employ a rich cast of characters―including ghost librarians, graduating fifth-graders, mice, and a cat―to dive into the heart of Martinville. … Full of heart, sly narration, and Stead’s expected air of mystery, this is well suited for lovers of books and libraries and novels featuring ensemble casts.” ―Booklist

“The Wild Robot Protects” by Peter Brown — “Action and epic confrontations keep the plot swimming along, but there are meaningfully punctuated moments of humor and kindness. Roz continues to learn and grow, and Brown’s superb illustrations make her journey truly unforgettable.”―Booklist, starred

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Apple Crush” by Lucy Knisley — “Warm, fortifying, and cozy—like a drink of apple cider.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Clementine Fox and the Great Island Adventure” by Leigh Juna — “Warm colors provide a welcoming feel, animated facial expressions add verve, and themes of communal care, friendship, and overcoming obstacles permeate this gently humorous narrative.” — Publishers Weekly

JUVENILE NON-FICTION

“Ancestory: The Mystery and Majesty of Ancient Cave Art” by Hannah Salyer — “Breathtaking illustrations capture the beauty and power of prehistoric artwork with remarkable precision. This luminous picture book about humanity’s shared stories is full of discoveries.” — Booklist (starred review)

“Follow the Flyway: The Marvel of Bird Migration” by Sarah Nelson — “This beautifully illustrated book, with poetic text by a St. Paul author, follows ducks, geese, herons, giant-winged pelicans, egrets, sandpipers, swans, loons and snipes as their babies begin their first migration down the majestic flyway” – St. Paul Pioneer Press

YOUNG ADULT FICTION

“Phoebe’s Diary” by Phoebe Wahl — “Filled with sprawling, detailed drawings and comics panels and replete with references to early aughts indie culture, this vividly captures the voice of a teen curious about herself and her future, all in an intimate tone, as if talking to a friend unabashed about what’s on her mind.”―Booklist

“A Thousand Boy Kisses” by Tillie Cole — “One kiss lasts a moment. But a thousand kisses can last a lifetime. One boy. One girl. A bond that is forged in an instant and cherished for a decade. A bond that neither time nor distance can break. A bond that will last forever. Or so they believe. When seventeen-year-old Rune Kristiansen returns from his native Norway to the sleepy town of Blossom Grove, Georgia, where he befriended Poppy Litchfield as a child, he has just one thing on his mind. Why did the girl who was one half of his soul, who promised to wait faithfully for his return, cut him off without a word of explanation? Rune’s heart was broken two years ago when Poppy fell silent. But when he discovers the truth of her absence, he finds that the greatest heartache is yet to come”– Baker & Taylor

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

“A First Time for Everything: A True Story” by Dan Santat — “[A] relatable story of self-discovery… the perfect balance of humor and poignancy.” ―Kirkus, starred review

“Hockey Girl Loves Drama Boy” by Faith Erin Hicks — “With a keen eye, Hicks (Ride On) delivers a heartfelt graphic novel that is both a perceptive subversion of gender roles and a remarkable tale of unexpected friendship, personal growth, and the transformative power of embracing one’s true self. “―Publishers Weekly, starred review

“How I Survived 4 Nights on Ice” by Serapio Ittusardjuat — “This graphic novel is gripping, and I was drawn in almost immediately…This book speaks to not only the importance of self-sufficiency, but also traditional lifestyle knowledge; something that was often stamped out by colonizers with residential schooling and legislation pointedly destroying cultural knowledge.”―The Tiny Activists

“Huda F Cares” by Huda Fahmy — “Comedic and poignant, Fahmy’s narrative captures universal feelings of fluctuating confidence and self-deprecation, the ups and downs of family dynamics, and the growing awareness of siblings’ humanity outside the family unit. The cartoonlike, full-color artwork is dynamic, with simplified features that accentuate facial expressions. Delightfully heartwarming.” —Kirkus

“Turtle Bread” by Kim-Joy — “When Yan stumbles upon Baking Club her social anxiety tries to keep her away, but the bakers encourage her to come out of her shell, especially the caring and supportive Bea, and soon Yan discovers her new friends may need her too.” — Baker & Taylor

“Victory Stand! Raising My Fist for Justice” by Tommie Smith — “In his phenomenal graphic memoir, “Victory. Stand! Raising My Fist for Justice,” Smith teams up with the award-winning author Derrick Barnes to tell his own riveting story of balancing athletic prowess and social activism. . . . Anyabwile’s stirring black-and-white illustrations propel this magnificently paced story, and underscore the infuriating professional repercussions of Smith’s activism. . . . Timely and timeless, Smith’s “Victory. Stand!” is a must read not just for sports fans but for everyone.” ― New York Times Book Review

“Where is Anne Frank” by Ari Folman — “Bringing to life Kitty, Anne Frank’s imaginary friend to whom she addressed her diary, this graphic novel, told from a unique perspective, recounts the complete story of Anne Frank’s life, while in the present day, Kitty discovers the true meaning of Anne Frank’s legacy.” — Atlas Publishing

YOUNG ADULT NON-FICTION

“The Lemon Tree: An Arab, A Jew, and the Heart of the Middle East” by Sandy Tolen — “Tolan weaves together dramatically different perceptions of the conflict and its context and explains how the lemon tree grew to become a powerful symbol of home.” ―NPR.or

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – OCTOBER 2023

ADULT FICTION

“Around the World in Eighty Days: A New Translation” by Jules Verne — “This new and completely original translation of Around the World in Eighty Days renders Jules Verne’s classic novel in a style that is both more understandable and more faithful to the spirit of the original French text than the commonly reprinted older English editions.” — Amazon.com

“Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead” by Olga Tokarczuk — “While it adopts the straightforward structure of a murder mystery, [the book features] macabre humor and morbid philosophical interludes [that] are distinctive to its author. . . [and an] excellent payoff at the finale. . . . As for Ms. Tokarczuk, there’s no doubt: She’s a gifted, original writer, and the appearance of her novels in English is a welcome development.”— The Wall Street Journal

“Land of Milk and Honey” by C. Pam Zhang — “Gloriously lush. Zhang’s sensuous style makes us see, smell and, above all, taste the lure of that sun-dappled mountain enclave. . . An atmospheric and poetically suspenseful novel about all manner of appetites: for power, food, love, life.”—NPR/Fresh Air

“North Woods” by Daniel Mason — “Brilliantly combines the granularity of realism with the timeless, shimmering allure of myth. . .Sui generis fiction . . . The forest and the trees: Mason keeps both in clear view in his eccentric and exhilarating novel.”—The New York Times Book Review

“The Horsewoman” by James Patterson and Mike Lupica — “This “hugely entertaining, riveting page-turner” (Louise Penny) follows the complicated relationship between mother and daughter as they face off in the Olympics—and into a ride they can barely control.” — Amazon.com

ADULT MYSTERY

“The Logmire Defense” by Craig Johnson — “[A] standout . . . The whodunit, which presents a dizzying number of red herrings, is one of Johnson’s trickiest, keeping readers deliciously off-balance throughout. Series newcomers will have no problem jumping into the action, and longtime readers will relish the dive into Longmire’s family history.” —Publishers Weekly

BLUE/DVD MOVIES

“Barbie”

BOARD BOOK

“Bizzy Bear: My First Memory Game: Vehicles” by Benji Davies
“Bizzy Bear: Pet Vet” by Benji Davies

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Lost Legends of Nothing” by Alejandra Green and Fanny Rodriquez — “In vibrant lineless art that’s reminiscent of classic animated films, Green and Rodriguez bring the castles, towns, and forests in the world of Nothing to life with expressive characters, a smattering of Spanish and Esperanto, and a strong cliffhanger that leaves room for a second installment.”  — Publishers Weekly

JUVENILE DVD MOVIES

“Elemental”
“The Little Mermaid”

JUVENILE NON-FICTION

“Climate Warriors: Fourteen Scientists and Fourteen Ways We Can Save Our Planet” by Laura Gehl — “The featured climate warriors are not only a balanced mix of men and women scientists with racial and ethnic diversity, but they also depict an amazing array of science itself, from ecology and materials science to psychology and economics.”―Booklist

“Detector Dogs, Dynamite Dolphins and More Animals with Super Sensory Powers” by Christina Couch and Cara Giaimo — “A perfect book for animal lovers, this narrative nonfiction book is a fascinating read about animals with super senses and how they can use those senses to help people complete important and frequently unusual tasks. . . the upbeat and entertaining text combined with the high-interest subject matter makes this book a great choice.” —School Library Connection

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

“A First Time for Everything” by Dan Santat — “Dan’s book manages to capture all the things that make you fall in love in the first place―awkwardness, humor, a bit of teen pathos, and most of all, sincerity and vulnerability.” ―LEUYEN PHAM, New York Times-bestselling illustrator of the Friends series

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – SEPTEMBER 2023

ADULT FICTION

“Abigail” by Magda Szabo — “Sequestered at a boarding school during World War II, a rebellious teenager confronts secrets, lies, and danger. . . . Urgent moral questions underlie a captivating mystery.” —Kirkus 

“Augusta” by Celia Ryker — “In this novel inspired by the challenging life of the author’s grandmother, a woman is left to raise her four children alone during the 1920s… Smooth-flowing prose carries the tale forward at a steady pace… farm and city vignettes create vivid images of time, place, and economic class, and Augusta emerges as a formidable woman in the face of daunting odds. A historically evocative period drama that’s poignant and disquieting.”– Kirkus Reviews

“Chenneville: A Novel of Murder, Loss and Vengenace” by Paulette Jiles — “In her richly lyrical prose, acclaimed author Jiles (Simon the Fiddler, 2020) turns to the waning weeks and months of the Civil War, a period when the scales of justice felt heavily tipped toward the war’s administrators and beneficiaries. Jiles uses John’s lawless quest to interrogate the inequalities in the justice system—inequalities that still echo loudly today.”  — Booklist (starred review)

“Eastbound” by Maylis de Kerangal — “I read Maylis de Kerangal’s short novella Eastbound earlier this year, which is about a young Russian conscript who, once aboard the Trans-Siberian rail, decides to desert and meets a French woman who helps him. I haven’t stopped thinking about it . . . De Kerangal reminded me how transportive it is when an author successfully creates that itching desire to know what happens next—without forgoing an ounce of style.” —Maya Chung, The Atlantic“Eastbound” by Maylis de Kerangal — “I read Maylis de Kerangal’s short novella Eastbound earlier this year, which is about a young Russian conscript who, once aboard the Trans-Siberian rail, decides to desert and meets a French woman who helps him. I haven’t stopped thinking about it . . . De Kerangal reminded me how transportive it is when an author successfully creates that itching desire to know what happens next—without forgoing an ounce of style.” —Maya Chung, The Atlantic

“Heart Bones” by Colleen Hoover — “Sexy, brooding Samson, especially, is just the kind of hero Hoover readers thirst for. This is sure to scratch an itch for fans.” ― Publishers Weekly

“In Memoriam” by Alice Winn — “…When was the last time characters in a novel seemed so real to me, so cherishable, so alive? Alice Winn has made familiar history fresh; no account of the First World War has made me feel so vividly its horror, or how irrevocably it mutilated the world. That In Memoriam is also an extraordinary love story is a sign of Winn’s wild ambition and her prodigious gifts: this is a novel that claims both beauty and brutality, the whole range of human life.” —Garth Greenwell, author of Cleanness

“It Happened One Summer” by Tessa Bailey — “Bailey delivers on her usual trifecta of sharp banter, instant chemistry, and high-heat sex scenes, but they are coupled with intense soul-searching for both Piper and Brendan… Another winning romance from an author at the top of her game.” — Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“Kairos” by Jenny Erpenbeck — “Erpenbeck’s handling of characters caught within the mesh (and mess) of history is superb. Threats loom over their love and over their country. Hans is jealous, weak-willed, vindictive, Katharina self-abasing. At heart the book is about cruelty more than passion, about secrets, betrayal, and loss.” ― Kirkus Reviews

“Maggie Brown & Others” by Peter Orner — “This collection’s forty-four powerful tales express Orner’s talent for crafting captivating character sketches that read like memoirs…Readers will sympathize with Orner’s characters and identify with their all-too-human frailties.”―Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Sold on a Monday” by Kristina McMorris — “The sale of two young children leads to devastating consequences in this historical tearjerker from McMorris… Set against the hardscrabble backdrop of the Great Depression, McMorris’s altruistic and sometimes damaged characters have moral compasses that realistically waver. A tender love story enriches a complex plot, giving readers a story with grit, substance, and rich historical detail.” ― Publishers Weekly

“The Book Club Hotel” by Sarah Morgan — “The Book Club Hotel is the kind of gift that arrives just when you most need it. Sarah Morgan has given us the perfect escape-and-find-yourself novel, featuring four very different women united by their shared love of books. Together, they illuminate the power of stories to validate and heal the heart, and the timeless bonds of friendship to keep us laughing, crying, and reading.” —Susan Wiggs, New York Times bestselling author

“The Cook” by Maylis de Kerangal — “Narrated with almost documentary-like precision . . . this portrait of self-taught chef Mauro is not just a beautifully delineated character study or inside look at a hard way to make a living but a perceptive meditation on the meaning of work itself . . . All this in just over 100 pages and done brilliantly. Highly recommended.” Library Journal (starred review)

“The Invisible Hour” by Alice Hoffman — “Alice Hoffman’s The Invisible Hour is a rich, immersive, magical reading experience. This beautiful novel is about the stories women tell each other and the ones that save us, about the price and peril of motherhood, and the difficulties women have faced throughout history in controlling their own fates. Alice Hoffman, the reigning queen of magical realism, takes her readers on a fantastic, mystical journey that celebrates the joy and power of reading and dares to believe in the impossible.” —Kristin Hannah, New York Times bestselling author of The Four Winds

“The Path to Sunshine Cove” by RaeAnne Thayne — “Thayne is a master at creating richly dimensional and kind characters from different generations who find themselves facing difficult challenges.”—Booklist on The Path to Sunshine Cove

“The Summer Job” by Lizzy Dent — “Beach Read meets Sweetbitter in this laugh-out-loud and ultimately heartwarming debut of a good friend’s very bad decision and the summer job that stands to ruin or make her life.” — Publisher Annotation

“The Vaster Wilds” by Lauren Groff — “Transcendent. Mesmerizing. Dazzling. Incandescent. Audacious….All of those descriptors are accurate and none of them are sufficient to describe just how spectacular [Groff’s] new book is.” —Atlanta Journal-Constitution

“The Year of Second Chances” by Lara Very — “It speaks to Avery’s skill that the novel soars from this implausible beginning. While there is romance and there is humor, this is not (as it might first seem) a meet-cute rom-com. It’s a story about grief, and about finding a way to move ahead after a traumatic loss — even if ‘moving ahead’ might not mean what you think it does.”  — Minneapolis Star Tribune

“Us Against You” by Fredrik Backman — “Backman (A Man Called Ove) returns to the hockey-obsessed village of his previous novel Beartown to chronicle the passion, violence, resilience, and humanity of the people who live there in this engrossing tale of small-town Swedish life… Backman’s excellent novel has an atmosphere of both Scandinavian folktale and Greek tragedy. Darkness and grit exist alongside tenderness and levity, creating a blunt realism that brings the setting’s small-town atmosphere to vivid life.” ― Publishers Weekly

“Whalefall” by Daniel Kraus — “A crazy, and crazily enjoyable, beat-the-clock adventure story about fathers, sons, guilt and the mysteries of the sea . . . [Kraus] brings the rigor of a scientist and the sensibility of a poet to his descriptions of the undersea world.” —New York Times

ADULT MYSTERY

“The Hunting Party” by Lucy Foley — “Like a deliciously drawn out game of Clue, this novel brings together a group of Oxford friends at a remote Scottish highlands estate for the Christmas holidays….Foley paints such a vivid hunting-lodge-and-lochs setting that you’ll immediately be booking your own highland fling, clandestine killers or no.” — National Geographic

“The River We Remember” by William Kent Krueger — “Absorbing. . . combines nostalgic settings with depictions of the lingering hardships and traumas of war and the home front . . . in the decade after WWII.” —Booklist (starred review)

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“Diary of an Invasion” by Andrey Kurkov — “Sergey is at once a war-weary adventurer and a fairy-tale innocent . . . His naive gaze allows Kurkov to get to the heart of a country bewildered by crisis and war, but where kindness can still be found . . . Translated by Boris Dralyuk with sensitivity and ingenuity.” —Uilleam Blacker, Times Literary Supplement

PICTURE BOOK

“The Little Blue Planet” by Anais La Rocca & Eve Grissinger

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Class Act” by Jerry Craft — “A well-Crafted, visually rich, truth-telling tale for our troubled times that affirms the eternal importance of friends.” — Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

YOUNG ADULT FICTION

“The Rage” by Lassiter Williams — “The Rage is fast-paced, gripping, and beautifully written, with a cast of appealing, unusual characters who struggle in a strange and threatening world.” — Reeve LindberghTwo Lives

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – AUGUST 2023

ADULT FICTION

“The Heaven and Earth Grocery Store” by James McBride — “Enchanting . . . [a] rich, carefully drawn portrait of a Depression-era community of African Americans and Jewish immigrants as they live, love, fight, and, of course, work.” —The Boston Globe

“Tom Lake” by Anne Patchett — “Tom Lake is about love in all its many forms. But it is also about death and the ephemeral and how everything goes by so damned fast. It is an elegy of sorts but also a promise that there will be magic no matter what.” — Los Angeles Review of Books

ADULT MYSTERY

“All the Sinners Bleed” by S. A. Cosby — “Riveting. . . What elevates this book is how Cosby weaves politically charged salient issues ― race, religion, policing ― through the prism of a serial murder investigation and the perspective of one of the most memorable heroes in contemporary crime fiction. . . Deeply moving and memorable.” ―Washington Post

“Chaos” by Iris Johansen — “Though Flynn is a new star in Johansen’s pantheon, her personification of familiar tropes of female strength, power, sexual attraction, and supernatural talents will make her an instant hit with Johansen’s many loyal fans.”―Booklist

“City of the Dead” by Jonathan Kellerman — “A gripping, readable thriller that combines elements of the police procedural, murder mystery, and psychological thriller genres.”—Booklist

“Mercy” by David Baldacci — “With an interesting storyline, amazing characters, and packed with action, fans are sure to love Mercy.”―Seattle Book Review

“No Way Out” by Fern Michaels — “Struggling to remember the accident leading to her boyfriend’s disappearance, a coma patient and video-game developer starts over in rural Mississippi, before an inexplicable reunion threatens everything she has rebuilt. By the best-selling author of the Sisterhood series.” — Atlas Publishing

“Ocean Prey” by John Sandford — “Entertaining. . . Fans will enjoy seeing the two old buddies and their cohorts wading into dangerous [sic] waters.”—Publishers Weekly

Over My Dead Body” by Jeffrey Archer — “In London, the Metropolitan Police set up a new Unsolved Murders Unit―a cold case squad―to catch the criminals nobody else can. In Geneva, millionaire art collector Miles Faulkner―convicted of forgery and theft―was pronounced dead two months ago. So why is his unscrupulous lawyer still representing a dead client? On a luxury liner en route to New York, the battle for power at the heart of a wealthy dynasty is about to turn to murder. And at the heart of all three investigations are Detective Chief Inspector William Warwick, rising star of the department, and ex-undercover agent Ross Hogan, brought in from the cold. But can they catch the killers before it’s too late?” — Publisher’s Annotation

“Overkill” by Sandra Brown — “Overkill is storytelling par excellence, weaving complex societal issues into the fabric of a thriller to create a terrific tapestry of emotionally wrought tension. The best book of the summer.”―Providence Journal

“Rising Tiger” by Brad Thor — “America’s top spy, Scot Harvath, with democracy itself hanging in the balance, is thrust into a completely unfamiliar culture where he can trust no one as he fights to take down the country’s most powerful enemy—and for his life.” — Atlas Publishing

“Serpentine” by Jonathan Kellerman — “LAPD homicide lieutenant Milo Sturgis and brilliant psychologist Alex Delaware investigate a decades-unsolved case involving a rich and spoiled client, a mysterious birth mother and violent coincidences. By the Edgar Award-winning author of True Detectives.” — Atlas Publishing

“The Dark Hours” by Michael Connelly — “A masterpiece… Meticulous about actual police procedure, Connelly makes the fundamentals of detective work engrossing while providing plenty of suspense and action.”―Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“The Family Game” by Catherine Steadman — “The Holbecks are what you might come up with if you took the Roys from Succession and blended them with the Murdochs, the Macbeths, and the Borgias. . . . The mysteries accrue, as does our admiration for Steadman, whose gift for invention only increases with each novel. . . . Let the fun begin!.”—The New York Times Book Review (Editors’ Choice)

“The Hunt” by Faye Kellerman — “Kellerman succeeds brilliantly in making the search for understanding as compelling as the search for the murderer.”  — Publishers Weekly

“The Last Party” by Clare Mackintosh — “A superb blend of psychological thriller and police procedural…A gripping portrait of two fractured people merges with believable plot twists, and the author perfectly captures the ennui of a small town where gossip can destroy lives. Mackintosh consistently entertains.” ― Publishers Weekly, STARRED review

“Crisply written … a fine thriller.”―Booklist“The Night She Disappeared” by Lisa Jewell — “As usual, the British author draws you in with characters and plot, building just enough tension and suspense that you will be rushing to find out just what happened.” ― St. Louis Post Dispatch

“The Red Book” by James Patterson and David Ellis — “”Crisply written … a fine thriller.”―Booklist

“The Soulmate” by Sally Hepworth — “The book is many things: a crime story, a psychological study, a blueprint for how and when to mete out information in a thriller. But most of all it is an inquiry into the mysteries of marriage and commitment, and into what we owe our spouses and one another.” —The New York Times Book Review

“The Third Game” by Lisa Jackson — “When the skeletal remains of two bodies and what appears to be an empty grave are found in a secret crypt in the cellar of a decaying Savannah, Ga., mansion in bestseller Jackson’s workmanlike fourth Pierce Reed/Nikki Gillette novel, police detective Pierce investigates…Enjoy catching up with Pierce and Nikki.” — Publishers Weekly 

“You Can Die” by Rebecca Zanetti — “Zanetti launches a romantic suspense series with this pitch-perfect blend of slow-burn romance and adrenaline-fueled thrills…Both awkward Laurel and dogged Huck are refreshing departures from typical leads while still remaining fiercely independent and easy to root for. Their romance only bolsters the deliciously intricate mystery. Readers will delight in this smart take on classic trope.” —Publishers Weekly, STARRED REVIEW

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“Don’t Tell Anybody the Secrets I Told You” by Lucinda Williams –“Remarkable . . . Reading like it was written on a series of cocktail napkins in the absolutely best way, this ever-quotable memoir of a born songsmith has something to offer nearly any grownup who has listened to music for the last half-century.”—Booklist

ADULT NON-FICTION

“All the Ways Our Dead Still Speak: A Funeral Director on Life, Death and the Hereafter” by Caleb Wilde — “In a wonderfully conversational tone, Wilde tackles themes of mortality, history, and justice with masterful felicity, delivering bracing big picture ideas about death and community. The result is an exceptionally soulful and insightful take on identity and the ways the dead linger among the living.” –―Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Roche: A Culinary Journey through the San Juan Island’s Illustrious Harbor” by Chef William D. Shaw and James O. Fraioli

“Thank Your for Your Servitude: Donald Trump’s Washington and the Price of Submission” by Mark Leibovich — “A fascinating account . . . The greatest value of Thank You For Your Servitude is Leibovich’s ability to understand the startling motivations of members of the House and Senate and many White House advisers and aides.” —The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

“The Ultimate Guide to Power and Influence: Everything You Need to Know” by Robert L. Dilenschneider — “An inspiring primer on navigating one’s life with self-knowledge and integrity.”—Kirkus Reviews

PICTURE BOOK

The Pout-Pout Fish and the Mad, Mad Day” by Deborah Diesen

CHILDREN’S KIT

“Aaron Slater, Illustrator” by Andrea Beaty — “In the illustration, a tableau of colorful mythological beings embodies Aaron’s tale. . .Empathetic art and lyrical text blend for a touching and empowering tale.” ―Kirkus Reviews

“Dog Diaries: Mission ImPAWsible” by James Patterson with Steven Butler — “Bolstered by Watson’s spry cartoons, Patterson and Butler’s rollicking story will catch–and hold–the attention of young readers, especially those of the dog-loving variety.” — Publisher’s Weekly

“Doggo and Pupper” by Katherine Applegate — “Declared boring by the cat of the house, a routine-oriented Doggo is dismayed by the messy antics of newcomer Pupper, who returns obedient, but decidedly unhappy, from puppy-training school.” — Atlas Publishing

“Marya Khan and the Fabulous Jasmine Garden” by Saadia Faruqi — “The characters are well-developed and feel like a well-integrated part of Marya’s universe. The humor is genuine, and warmth exudes from the dialogue and prose. Faruqi continues to create relatable protagonists with age-relevant and real-kid struggles and triumphs while offering an authentic portrayal of a Muslim, Pakistani family. Authentic friendships, layered family dynamics, and the adventures of an intrepid heroine make this a must-have series that should be shelved next to Renée Watson’s “Ryan Hart” books.”―School Library Journal

“The Mind-Blowing World of Extraordinary Competitions: Meet the Incredible People Who Will Compete at Anything” by Anna Goldfield — “This audiobook features music and special effects. Listen along and enjoy the fun that is The Mind-Blowing World of Extraordinary Competitions.” — Amazon.com

“Thirst” by Varsha Bajai — “The riveting story of a heroic girl who fights for her belief that water should be for everyone.” — Amazon.com

“What’s Inside a Flower: An Other Questions about Science & Nature” by Rachel Ignotofsky — “Budding backyard scientists can start exploring their world with this stunning introduction to these flowery show-stoppers – from seeds to roots to blooms. Learning how flowers grow gives kids beautiful building blocks of science and inquiry.” — Amazon.com

“When You Trap a Tiger” by Tae Keller — “Would you make a deal with a magical tiger? This uplifting story brings Korean folklore to life as a girl goes on a quest to unlock the power of stories and save her grandmother.” — Amazon.com

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – APRIL 2023

ADULT FICTION

“Hang the Moon” by Jeannette Walls — “A rip-roaring, action-packed novel set during prohibition filled with head-spinning plot twists and enough dead bodies, doomed romances, and sudden betrayals to make you wonder if George R.R. Martin had decided to ditch fantasy for Southern Gothic.” —The New York Times 

“Happy Place “ by Emily Henry — “If you’re looking for a magical second-chance romance that will make your heart ache and read compulsively to find out what happened to the perfect couple (and whether they’ll get their happily ever after), then Happy Place is sure to keep you up all night!”
The Nerd Daily

“Homecoming” by Kate Morton — “Morton keeps the secrets coming, leading up to a powerful, emotional conclusion. This is storytelling at its finest.” — Booklist (starred review)

“Old Babes in the Wood” by Margaret Atwood — “Atwood explores love and loss in this brilliant collection that mixes fantastical stories about the afterlife with realism…She’s writing at the top of her considerable powers here.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“The Librarian of Burned Books” by Brianna Labuskes — “Inspired by the fascinating real story of a little-known World War II-era group of librarians, authors, publishers, and booksellers who united to fight fascism with literature, THE LIBRARIAN OF BURNED BOOKS is a thoroughly engrossing page-turner that proves how powerful words and ideas can be, no matter the era. Filled with intrigue and secrets, this timely novel follows three women from Berlin to Paris to New York City to right past wrongs using books as their weapon of choice._ — Elise Hooper, author of Angels of the Pacific

“We All Want Impossible Things” by Catherine Newman — “Excruciatingly heartbreaking, but I laughed out loud on almost every page. And I am not an easy laughter. Newman’s voice is hilarious and warm; her characters feel like old friend . . . a winning novel.” — Julie Klam, New York Times Book Review

“Weyward” by Emilia Hart — “A promising debut…Hart links the three stories very cleverly in this entertaining read about witchcraft, maternal ties and the power of the natural world.” ––The Times (UK)

ADULT MYSTERY

“A Heart Full of Headstones” by Ian Rankin — “Outstanding. . . the well-constructed plot is matched by brooding, atmospheric prose. This is one of Rankin’s best Rebus novels in years.”―Publishers Weekl

“Murder in an Irish Castle” by Verity Bright — “I am hooked! This is the best book, bar none, that I have read this year… An extremely witty, fast-paced mystery… I love the heroine, intrepid adventuress… A most enjoyable read!” — Reviews by Carol in Tallahassee

“Simply Lies” by David Baldacci — “Baldacci is at his best in this standalone thriller. [He] keeps the twists coming fast and furious in this tense page-turner, never losing credibility even as it takes bigger and bigger swings. Readers will fall in love with Mickey and hold their breath for her through to the very end.”―Publishers Weekly, starred review

“The Housemaid” by Freida McFadden — “Don’t miss the USA Today bestseller and addictive psychological thriller with a jaw-dropping twist that’s burning up Instagram–Freida McFadden’s The Housemaid is perfect for fans of Ruth Ware, Lisa Jewell, and Verity.” — Grand Central Publishing

“The Last Remains” by Elly Griffiths — “The discovery of a missing woman’s bones force Ruth and Nelson to finally confront their feelings for each other as they desperately work to exonerate one of their own in this not-to-be-missed Ruth Galloway mystery from USA Today bestselling author Elly Griffiths….” — Publisher Annotation:

“The White Lady” by Jacqueline Winspear — “The White Lady is a phenomenal read. You are prisoner from the opening paragraph until the suspenseful conclusion . . . .This thrilling book reveals much about mankind. Humans can be brutal, tender, kind, treacherous, cold, friendly, tremendously loyal, deceiving, brave, cowardly. Jacqueline Winspear includes all of these traits in The White Lady.” — New York Journal of Books

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“Master, Slave, Husband, Wife: An Epic Journey from Slavery to Freedom” by Ilyon Woo — “Master Slave Husband Wife is a suspenseful, sensitively rendered account of [Ellen and William Craft’s] four-day journey to the North. . . . Woo tells the story [with] a cinematic eye. She excels at setting scenes, conjuring the sensations experienced by the Crafts at each harrowing point. . . . The vivid details help Woo to convey the Crafts’ attention to every element of their plot.” — W. Caleb McDaniel ― The New York Times Book Review

“The Best Strangers in the World: Stories from a Life Spent Listening” by Ari Shapiro — “The book keeps on giving, chapter after chapter, in turns humorous, introspective, or deeply serious, weaving together personal anecdotes, behind-the-scenes secrets, and heartbreaking profiles from war zones and refugee camps. Shapiro says he’s built his radio career on ‘empathy, connection, and listening’— qualities that ring true in his writing as well.” — Booklist (starred review)

ADULT NON-FICTION

“Rare Trees: The Fascinating Stories of the World’s Most Threatened Species” by Sara Oldfield — “A lavishly illustrated, lovingly detailed compendium of “rare trees” of the world…In their noble efforts to honor these “rare” trees, the authors will certainly sensitize readers to the trees’ value and their peril.”―Booklist

PARENTING

“The Read Aloud Factor: How to Create the Habit that Boosts Your Baby’s Brain” by Rehka Rajan — “A must, chock-full of usable ideas and recommended reads and sure to be a favorite for parents of preschoolers.” — Library Journal starred review

EASY READERS

“Alligator” by August Hoeft
“Eyes that Speak to the Stars” by Joanna Ho
“No Nibbling!” by Beth Ferry
“No, Monkey! & Rock Croc” by Katie Dale

PICTURE BOOK

“Eyes that Speak to the Stars” by Joanna Ho
“No Nibbling” by Beth Ferry

JUVENILE FICTION

“Amari and the Night Brothers” by B. B. Alston — “In this thrilling debut, Alston thrusts his intrepid heroine into a setting packed with magic, mythical creatures, and danger. Amari, a Black girl with limited means, confronts privilege and prejudice even while delving into a world of wonder, humor, and adventure, making this a sure-to-please winner.” — Publishers Weekly (starred review)

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Bea Wolf” by Zach Weinersmith — “Weinersmith’s richly evocative turns of phrase run the gamut from hilarious to heart-rending and maintain the flavor of the original without bogging the pace down amid the kennings. Boulet’s illustrations imbue the shenanigans with gleeful energy and a touch of dark absurdity that children, seeing their own fears and triumphs reflected, will delight in.”―Kirkus, starred review

“Dog Man: Twenty Thousand Fleas Under the Sea” by Dav Pilkey — “High-intensity, heartwarming, and, above all, hysterically funny.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Dream to Reality” by Brad Gann — “First Woman tells the tale of Callie Rodriguez, the first woman to explore the Moon. While Callie is a fictional character, the first female astronaut and person of color will soon set foot on the Moon – a historic milestone and part of upcoming NASA missions. Through a series of graphic novels and digital platforms, First Woman aims to capture our attention and unite the next generation of explorers who will return to the Moon.” — Goodreads.com

“Hilo: Gina and the Last City on Earth” by Judd Winick — “I”s Gina the hero the world needs? Gina, D.J., and Hilo are back with an epic time-turning adventure in the New York Times bestselling graphic novel series that kids and critics love!” — Amazon.com

“Mary Anne’s Bad Luck Mystery” by Cynthia Yuan Cheng — “Crisp and spot on.” — Booklist

“The Moth Keeper” by K. O’Neill — “In few words and a style reminiscent of Miyazaki, the Eisner Award-winning O’Neill spins a luminous fantasy about a fox girl, entrusted with protecting her night-village, who wonders what it would be like to live in the light.” —The New York Times

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – JANUARY 2023

ADULT FICTION

“Great Circle” by Maggie Shipstead — “Transcendent . . . A rolling, roiling epic . . . Through the interwoven stories of impetuous flyer Marian Graves and flavor-of-the-month actress Hadley Baxter, Shipstead ponders the motivating forces behind acts of daring defiance, self-fulfillment and self-destruction. An ambitious, soaring saga—[Shipstead] takes her characters to dizzying heights, drawing readers into lives of courage and mystery.”
Booklist

“In Love’s Time” by Kate Breslin — “MI6 agent Marcus Weatherford lives by the principle of duty before love, but with WWI nearing its end, he hopes to finally fulfill his promise of forever to Clare Danner …. Set in 1918 in England, In Love’s Time features the tender rediscovery of love amidst the high-stakes danger of wartime espionage tied to the Russian Empire in WWI. Clare embodies emotional vulnerability, resilience, and faith in the face of the unknown. Readers will be thrilled by the race-against-the-clock conclusion and the palpable passion between Marcus and Clare that is simmering below the surface.” — Kate Campos, AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2022.

“The Lies I Tell” by Julie Clark — “Intriguing…Clark skillfully fleshes out the strong, multifaceted characters. The story nicely mixes brisk plot points with slow burning reveals as it builds to a satisfying conclusion. Clark doesn’t disappoint.” ― Publishers Weekly

“The Mother-in-Law” by Sally Hepworth — “A deliciously entertaining novel about one woman’s complicated relationship with her mother-in-law that ends in death. This one is perfect for fans of Big Little Lies.” ―Good Morning America

ADULT MYSTERY

“Bloody Soil” by S. Lee Manning — “…the action rarely lets up…riveting, energetic…with lead characters worth rooting for.”-Kirkus Reviews

“The Department of Rare Books and Special Collections” by Eva Jurczyk — “Who doesn’t love a mystery involving rare books and bad librarians? This clever, deftly written story has all that and more. A great pleasure from beginning to end.” ― Karen Joy Fowler, New York Times bestselling author

“The Rising Tide” by Ann Cleeves — “A friend of mine once joked that the work of Ann Cleeves is the closest the crime-fiction genre comes to evoking ASMR ― the euphoric, pleasant, spine-tingling sensation that’s all the rage on YouTube. The books never get too dark, never venture too far into dangerous territory, but aren’t outright cozy, either…. This is the work of a pro ― a diverting, solidly crafted mystery that’s guaranteed to entertain.”―New York Times Book Review

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“The Revolutionary Samuel Adams” by Stacy Schiff — “This enthralling biography is a persuasive exercise in rehabilitation. Through stylish prose and a close reading of Adams’s career as a canny propagandist, Schiff suggests that he may have done more than any other founder to prime colonists for armed rebellion and deserves to be better known.”―Gregory Cowles, New York Times, Editors’ Choice

ADULT NON-FICTION

“American Midnight: The Great War, a Violent Peace, and Democracy’s Forgotten Crisis” by Adam Hochschild — “A sweeping look at the years between World War I and the Roaring Twenties, when conscientious objectors to the war were maltreated and conflicts over race and labor were at a high pitch. Hochschild draws direct lines between events of that time and the unrest of today.” — New York Times, 15 Works of Nonfiction to Read This Fall

“Breathe In Breathe Out: Restore Your Health, Reset Your Mind and Find Happiness Through Breathwork” by Stuart Sandeman — “[The exercises] offer a variety of ways to try breathwork… [Breathe In, Breathe Out] gets the job done.” –Publishers Weekly

Solar Power for Beginners, 2 in 1 bundle: A DIY Guide to Solar Energy, Designing and Installing Grid-tied, Hybrid, and Off-grid Solar Systems for Your House, RV, Camper Van, Boar, Cabin and Tiny Home” by DIY Source — “Are you willing to cut your electricity bill in half by adding a solar setup to your house?
If yes, then this 2 in 1 solar power DIY bundle book is written for you!” — Amazon

“The Myth of Normal: Trauma, Illness & Healing in a Toxic Culture” by Gabor Mate — “In The Myth of Normal, Gabor Maté takes us on an epic journey of discovery about how our emotional well-being, and our social connectivity (in short: how we live), is intimately intertwined with health, disease and addictions. Chronic mental and physical illnesses may not be separate and distinct diseases, but intricate, multilayered processes that reflect (mal)adaptations to the cultural context that we live in, and the values we live by. This riveting and beautifully written tale has profound implications for all of our lives, including the practice of medicine and mental health.”–Bessel A. van der Kolk MD, President, Trauma Research Foundation, Professor of psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine, #1 New York Times Bestseller: The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind and Body in the Healing of Trauma

“The Progress Illusion: Reclaiming our Future from the Fairytale of Economics” by Jon D. Erickson — “Erickson’s powerful new book shows how flawed economic thinking has shaped not only our economy but also our society and politics. The story is both deeply disturbing and hopeful, as Erickson describes an emerging brand of economics that shifts focus from GDP to well-being. Highly recommended.” — James Gustave Speth, former Dean, Yale School of the Environment; author of “America the Possible: Manifesto for a New Economy”

“The Woodchip Handbook: A Complete Guide for Farmers, Gardeners and Landscapers” by Ben Raskin — “Ben Raskin’s wide-ranging work in varied locations makes The Woodchip Handbook a really useful overview of the possibilities afforded by woodchip. It’s good for soil and good for plants, once you understand how it can work best for you, as he explains in this book.”―Charles Dowding, author of Charles Dowding’s No Dig Gardening

“Why Fish Don’t Exist: A Story of Loss, Love, and the Hidden Order of Life” by Lulu Miller — “Riveting. Surprising. Shocking, even! Why Fish Don’t Exist begins with a mesmerizing account of the life of distinguished biologist David Starr Jordan—and then, quite unexpectedly, turns into so much more. Narrated in Lulu Miller’s intimate, quirky voice, this is a story of science and struggle, of heartbreak and chaos. This book will capture your heart, seize your imagination, smash your preconceptions, and rock your world.” — Sy Montgomery, New York Times bestselling author of The Soul of an Octopus

PARENTING

“Sewing Quiet Books for Children: Easy to Make, Easy to Customize: 18 Step-by-Step Page Projects with Patterns” by Lily Zunic — “…Zunic shows how to construct two different types of cloth books–one for babies and one for toddlers–that will spark a sense of textile learning that can’t be matched by technology. Information on materials and basic techniques prefaces the project instructions, which feature how-to information on fabrics, zipper sewing, and pattern transfer as well as hands-on, step-by-step instructions for fabricating either a sewn-spine or ring-bound activity book. … Includes 14 full-size templates.” — Barbara Jacobs. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2022.

“The Sears Baby Book: Everything You Need to Know about Your Baby from Birth to Age Two” by William Sears, M.D. — “The million-copy bestseller by “the man who remade motherhood” (TIME) has now been revised, expanded, and bought thoroughly up-to-date — with the latest information on prenatal vitamins, breastfeeding practices, daycare, midwifery, hospital births, preventing and overcoming postpartum depression, and infant development.” — Amazon.com

BOARD BOOK

“Poppy’s Feelings”
“Poppy’s Shape Search”
“Where’s Poppy”

PICTURE BOOK

“After the Snowfall” by Rich Lo
“I am Human: A Book of Empathy” by Susan Verde

JUVENILE BIOGRAPHY

“Sanctuary: Kip Tiernan and Rosie’s Place, the Nation’s First Shelter” by Christine McDonnell — “Author Christine McDonnell, who has taught English to immigrants at Rosie’s Place, adeptly conveys the narrative arc of Tiernan’s life. . . . Victoria Tentler-Krylov’s atmospheric illustrations draw readers into Tiernan’s surroundings with immediacy and emotion. . . . This thoughtful book conveys a powerful, important message: ‘When you listen to others, you show respect; you learn who they are and what they need.'” —BookPage (starred review)

JUVENILE FICTION

“The Door of No Return” by Kwame Alexander — “Interweaving moments of joyful exuberance and heartbreaking sadness via sensate lines by turns sweet and stinging, Alexander’s sweeping novel conjures a captivating, resonant world of African tradition, life, and ancestral wisdom.”―Publishers Weekly, starred review

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Claire and the Dragons” by Wander Atunes — “Claire and the Dragons is a female-centric fantasy adventure comic book series set in a Dark Ages-like world written and illustrated by Brazilian creator Wander Antunes and published by Scout Comics’ all-ages imprint Scoot. — Amazon.com

“Extraordinary” A Story of an Ordinary Princess” by Cassie Anderson — “While her sisters were blessed at birth with exceptional skills, Princess Basil’s “gift” is to be ordinary. But can a princess be ordinary? Inspired by M. M. Kaye’s beloved novel!” — Amazon.com

“Fish Girl” by David Wiesner and Donna Jo Napoli — “The triple Caldecott winner David Wiesner brings his rich visual imagination and trademark artistry to the graphic novel format in a unique coming-of-age tale that begins underwater. A young mermaid, called Fish Girl, in a boardwalk aquarium has a chance encounter with an ordinary girl. Their growing friendship inspires Fish Girl’s longing for freedom, independence, and a life beyond the aquarium tank. Sparkling with humor and brilliantly visualized, Fish Girl’s story will resonate with every young person facing the challenges and rewards of growing up.” — Onix Annotations,

YOUNG ADULT FICTION

“Big Boned” by Jo Watson — “Big Boned is an optimistic novel whose warm cast subverts convention, and whose heroine learns to take risks.” ―Foreword

“I was Born for This” by Alice Oseman — “A funny, wise, and heartbreakingly true coming of age novel. I Was Born for This is a stunning reflection of modern teenage life, and the power of believing in something — especially yourself.” — Amazon.com

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

“Unfamiliar” by Haley Newsome — “Based on the wildly popular webcomic from Tapas, Unfamiliar is an endearing and whimsical story full of magical mayhem, offbeat outsiders, and the power of friendships and found family. …” Onix Annotations

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – DECEMBER 2022

ADULT FICTION

“After Lives” by Abdulrazak Gurnah — “An appreciation for quiet, ordinary forms of heroism runs throughout. . . . One can take away lessons and meanings from this novel, yet such things are perhaps less significant than the sheer seeming realness of the characters, whose presences Mr. Gurnah has faithfully crafted into existence, with all of their dreaming, their sorrow and their resilience.”—Wall Street Journal

“Four Treasures of the Sky” by Jenny Tinghui Zhang — “Fierce and moving…Zhang delves into the history of violence and prejudice against Chinese people in the U.S. with her debut, a lyrical and sweeping Bildungsroman…The author skillfully delineates the many characters and offers fascinating details on Chinese calligraphy and literature, along with an unsparing view of white supremacy.” ―Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“No Land to Light” by Yara Zgheib — “Zgheib’s prose is sensory, piquant with the scent of spices even as it captures the sorrow of living in exile while war destroys your homeland. But the novel’s real power is in humanizing the cruelties and injustices visited on migrants caught up in the travel ban.” ― Library Journal (starred)

“The Book of Goose” by Yiyun Li — “This is a novel of deceptions and cruelty . . . But within this somber mood is something brilliant. With characteristic poise, Li depicts the intricacies of ordinary lives: childhood friendship, growing up, and existences as slow as the passively ‘floating’ geese Agnès watches.” ―Francesca Peacock, The Spectator

“The Boys from Biloxi” by John Grisham — “John Grisham returns to Mississippi with the riveting story of two sons of immigrant families who grow up as friends, but ultimately find themselves on opposite sides of the law. Grisham’s trademark twists and turns will keep you tearing through the pages until the stunning conclusion.” — Amazon.com

“The Dead Romantics” by Ashley Poston — “Romance, chaos, and complications are central components in Poston’s refreshingly fun, spirited rom-coms, and The Dead Romantics is no exception. The beauty and charm of Poston’s storytelling continues to make miraculous happy endings out of the messes in which ordinary people often find themselves entangled.” —Shelf Awareness

“The Dreamtime” by Mstyslav Chernov — “Chernov is a singular voice writing about Ukraine today, and The Dreamtime is essential reading to understanding the ways that war has infiltrated people’s everyday lives far beyond the front lines. It is an ambitious novel that draws together diverse perspectives to reflect the raw emotions of life and death.” ― Emily Channell-Justice, Director, Temerty Contemporary Ukraine Program

“The Flight Portfolio” by Julie Orringer — “Magnificent . . . a deeply researched, almost unbearably tense, bruised-knuckle hybrid. Part real history and part love story, it’s also a deeply moral work, asking tough questions about what matters most to us personally—and to the world.” — The Boston Globe

“The Latecomer” by Jean Hanff Korelitz — “If this novel is funny, it is also cutting, a nearly forensic study of family conflict. Husband and wife are at odds; children pull away not only from their parents but from one another. Nimbly, Korelitz juggles the stories of each parent and child, weaving a tapestry of secrets, antipathies and private quests. … It’s testament to Korelitz’s achievement that her novel leaves us wanting more.” ―New York Times Book Review

“The Light Pirate” by Lily Brooks-Dalton — “A formidable young woman’s coming-of-age . . . Brooks-Dalton creates an all-too-believable picture of nature reclaiming Florida from its human inhabitants, and her complex and engaging characters make climate disaster a vividly individual experience rather than an abstract subject of debate.”―Kirkus, Starred Review

“The Rabbit Hutch” by Tess Gunty — “Ambitious . . . Despite offering a dissection of contemporary urban blight, the novel doesn’t let social concerns crowd out the individuality of its characters, and Blandine’s off-kilter brilliance is central to the achievement.”—The New Yorker

“The Reindeer Hunters” by Lars Mytting — “…Pastor Kai Schweigaard is haunted by the past; he was responsible for the loss of the village’s ancient stave church and its sister bells cast in the 1600s in memory of two famous weavers, conjoined twin sisters. These twins created the Hekne Weave, a tapestry depicting Skrapanatta, the end of days. While Schweigaard searches for the Weave and what it might portend, Jehans, a Hekne and son of Schweigaard’s lost love, struggles to make his way. Butangen lingers in the grip of feudalism, but change is inevitable. This novel explores themes of modernization and identity on various levels: national (Norway’s separation from its union with Sweden), familial, and religious (Norse myth and Christianity). The world Mytting creates is immersive, including descriptions of reindeer hunting and the feel of a scythe on a whetstone. The result is a fascinating story with centuries-old echoes, their muted peal resonating like the separated sister bells.” — Bethany Latham. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2022. — Booklist

“The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida” by Shehan Karunatilaka — “Comic, macabre, angry and thumpingly alive… [Maali’s voice] has bite, brilliance, and sparkle… Still, the furious comedy in Mr. Karunatilaka’s novel never courts despair.”― Economist

“The Whalebone Theatre” by Joanna Quinn — “What’s remarkable, especially for a first novel, is Quinn’s deft way of depicting this lost world—whether a subsiding seaside aristocracy or a training school for British agents or a Parisian theater in wartime . . . Her vision is so fine and fully realized that it’s hard to imagine her doing anything else—and hard to have to wait to see what that might be.” —Washington Post

ADULT MYSTERY

“A World of Curiosities” by Louise Penny — “Penny delves into the nature of evil, sensitively exploring the impact of the dreadful events she describes while bringing a warmth and humanity to her disparate cast of characters that, unusually for a crime novel, leaves you feeling better about the world once you’ve finished.” ―The Guardian

“All Good People Here” by Ashley Flowers — “All Good People Here has enough twists and layers for three novels. Ashley Flowers has taken a premise familiar to true-crime fans and created a story that’s compelling and psychologically rich, with an ending that’s as unnerving as it is satisfying.” —Lou Berney

“City on Fire” by Don Winslow — “A masterwork of mob fiction. . . City on Fire does for Rhode Island what David Chase’s The Sopranos did for New Jersey. . . It’s Winslow’s ways with character, as well as his fluid narrative and highly visual scene-setting, that suggest this novel, the first in a planned trilogy, could well end up in the American-mob canon along with the works of Puzo, Scorsese and Chase.” — Washington Post

“Going Rogue” by Janet Evanovich — “Full of surprises, thrills, and humor, Going Rogue reveals a new side of Stephanie Plum, and shows Janet Evanovich at her scorching, riotous best.” — Amazon.com

“The Bangalore Detectives” by Harini Nagendra — “The first in an effervescent new mystery series by the ecology professor Harini Nagendra, The Bangalore Detectives Club turns the clock back a century. This is a treat for historical mystery lovers looking for a new series to savor (or devour).” — Sarah Weinman ― The New York Times Book Review

“The Bullets that Missed” by Richard Osman — “The Bullet That Missed hits on every front. Its quandaries stymie, its solutions thrill, its banter is worth reciting and its characters exemplify an admirable camaraderie. One can only hope that the Thursday Murder Club’s next outing appears before long.” —Wall Street Journal

The Secrets of Winter” by Nicola Upson — “A truly brilliant twist…yet, it is the quality of writing that makes this pulpy novel not just for Christmas but for life.” —The UK Times

“The Twist of a Knife” by Anthony Horowitz — “In New York Times bestselling author Anthony Horowitz’s ingenious fourth literary whodunit following The Word is Murder, The Sentence is Death, and A Line to Kill, Horowitz becomes the prime suspect in a murder investigation—and only one man can prove his innocence: his newly estranged partner in solving crime, Detective Hawthorne.” — Publisher Annotation

“The Unkempt Woman” by Allison Montclair — “Exemplary… Montclair’s capable, funny, and fully developed leads set a gold standard.” –-Publishers Weekly (starred review)

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“Alzheimer’s Canyon: One Couple’s Reflections on Living with Dementia” by Jane Dwinell & Sky Yardley — “… Jane Dwinell and Sky Yardley take us on a journey with them into the uncharted world of Alzheimer’s Disease. They bravely navigate the depths of Alzheimer’s Canyon, shining a light in a disorienting landscape. Their unflinching honesty about their lived experience serves as an emotional road map for anyone facing an unexpected challenge. Out of her grief, Dwinell offers this gift, and hope.” –David Goodman, bestselling author and host of The Vermont Conversation

“And There Was Light: Abraham Lincoln and the American Struggle” by John Meacham — “Biography at its best, the great historian Barbara Tuchman wrote, paints an intimate portrait of an individual which simultaneously provides a sweeping view of history. With this deep, compelling work, Jon Meacham has achieved this gold standard. Written with wisdom and grace, his story of Lincoln’s complex moral journey to Emancipation mirrors America’s long quest to live up to its founding ideals.” —Doris Kearns Goodwin

“Sigh, Gone: A Misfit’s Memoir of Great Books, Punk Rock and the Fight to Fit In” by Phuc Tran — “Funny, poignant, and unsparing, Tran’s sharp, sensitive, punk-inflected memoir presents one immigrant’s quest for self-acceptance through the lens of American and European literary classics. A highly witty and topical read―an impressive debut.” ―Kirkus (starred review)

“The Light We Carry: Overcoming in Uncertain Times” by Michelle Obama —
“Obama’s road map for uncertain times resonates in ways that other self-help books do not. . . . Through her stories, experiences and thoughts, we’re finding the light with her.” —The New York Times  

ADULT NON-FICTION

“15-Minute Ink Landscapes: Simple, Striking, Soothing Lineart of Forests, Mountains, Beaches and More” by Rosa Hoehn — “15-Minute Ink Landscapes is a great guide for beginners looking to get comfortable with drawing different nature-based designs. Rosa offers solid tips and guided examples along the way. I highly recommend this book!” ― Jason Yates, artist and founder of @Jy.Ink

“Best Road Trips Ontario & Quebec: Escapes on the Open Road” by Shawn Duthie & others — “The Perfect Choice: Lonely Planet’s Ontario & Quebec’s Best Road Trips is perfect for exploring Ontario and Quebec via the road and discovering sights that are more accessible by car.” — Amazon.com

“Dorie’s Cookies” by Dorie Greenspan — “Dorie has written the perfect book to satisfy the Cookie Monster in all of us. These recipes are both classic and inventive and totally delicious.” — Ina Garten, Barefoot Contessa cookbooks and television

“From Scratch: Adventures in Harvesting, Hunting, Fishing and Foraging on a Fragile Planet” by David & Jon Moscow — “This is delicious, adventuresome entertainment for the mind, soul, heart, and stomach. A dynamic, ruminative journal for food lovers and armchair globe-trotters.” — Kirkus Review

“Psychology of Positive Aging” by Ellen Heuven — “While it is undeniable that certain physical functions start to decline from a certain age, both the life stories of the interviewees and scientific literature show that psychological functioning can become more robust into old age. The women in this book are inspiring role models who show how you can grow, live a fulfilling live and achieve goals, not so much DESPITE but WITH or THANKS to aging.” — Amazon.com

“Turning Bowls with Richard Raffan” by Richard Raffan — “The worlds pre-eminent woodturning teacher provides everything you need to know to turn bowls. Richard Raffan draws upon his 30 plus years of experience to lead you through the key elements — from planning to completion.” — Amazon.com

PICTURE BOOK

“You Are Never Alone” by Elin Kelsey

JUVENILE FICTION

“Mapmaker” by Lisa Moore Ramee — “This is an exciting adventure full of friendship and heart with a likable nerdy-Black-kid protagonist…. Readers will enjoy the well-drawn characters as well as the fantastical landscapes and imaginative creatures in Walt’s magical world.” — Horn Book Magazine

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Bobo and Pup-Pup: Let’s Make Cake” by Vikram Madan — “This hilarious and relatable graphic chapter book will have kids ages 5-8 laughing out loud while gaining confidence in reading.” — Amazon.com

“Bobo and Pup-Pup: The Funny Book” by Vikram Madan — “A super funny book has Pup-Pup literally laughing out loud!! Bobo wants to read it so he can laugh too, but he must wait till Pup-Pup is finished. But the more Pup-Pup laughs, the harder it is to wait! All kids know that waiting is not easy!! What happens when Bobo’s patience runs out and he takes matters into his own hands?” — Amazon.com

“Bobo and Pup-Pup: We Love Bubbles” by Vikram Madan — “Grab some bubble mix and join Pup-Pup and Bobo for a good read.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Bunnicula” by James Howe — “Before it’s too late, Harold the dog and Chester the cat must find out the truth about the newest pet in the Monroe household — a suspicious-looking bunny with unusual habits… and fangs!” — GoodReads

“Cat Kid: Comic Club Collaborations” by Dav Pilkey — “Excitement and imagination run wild as Naomi, Melvin, Poppy, Gilbert, Curly, and their siblings get back to making comics with originality and laughter. But wait — have they cleaned their rooms yet?!” — Amazon.com

“Cat Kid: Comic Club on Purpose” by Dav Pilkey — “…. Here exploring the concept of purpose, Pilkey lets characters and readers ponder its complexity–with butt jokes keeping the tone light. While its theme is not as clearly developed as the previous volume’s, this episode nevertheless presents the series’ now-trademark winning mix of sibling hijinks and club members’ comics, rendered in a variety of styles.” — Kirkus Media LLC

“Cat’s Cradle: The Golden Twine” by Jo Rioux — “At times vividly hair-raising, the book never overwhelms the reader, making it a worthy entry in the too-small category of scary fun for middle grade readers… Thanks to Rioux’s crackerjack pace and dramatic panel composition, The Golden Twine is hard to put down.”―New York Times

“Crush” by Svetlana Chmakova — “Jorge seems to have it all together. He’s big enough that nobody really messes with him, but he’s also a genuinely sweet guy with a solid, reliable group of friends. The only time he ever really feels off his game is when he crosses paths with a certain girl… But when the group dynamic among the boys starts to shift, will Jorge be able to balance what his friends expect of him versus what he actually wants?” — Amazon.com

“Deep into the Amazon Jungle” by James O. Fraioli — “Vibrant and dramatic illustrations accompany this riverside adventure that introduces young readers to the diverse populations that reside in the Amazon. Kids will also learn about the consequences of deforestation for our entire planet—as well as the numerous ways that every person can do their share to preserve our forests, reduce waste, and help the environment.” — Amazon.com

“Enemies” by Svetlana Chmakova — “Felicity’s sure she’s going to do something big. Exactly what is still a mystery, but she’ll figure it out. Her sister, Letty, teases Felicity that she never finishes stuff, but that’s just because Letty is so perfect. Still, life is good with plenty of friends—drawing with the art club and playing games with her buddies keep her busy. But when she decides to join a contest to show Letty that she can get things done, Felicity begins to wonder if friends becoming enemies is easier than she thought. Are they really enemies, though…? What does it even mean to be enemies? And…who is it that she needs the most on her side…?” — Amazon.com

“Freestyle” by Gale Galligan — “A visually kinetic, emotionally complex story of finding a sense of self while navigating relationships and expectations. Fun and full of heart.” — School Library Journal, starred review

“Frizzy” by Claribel A. Ortega — “In the creators’ graphic novel debut, themes of anti-Blackness, colorism, and self-acceptance are explored with ­nuance and honesty. The subject of internalized racism is discussed in a way that will resonate with kids and families grappling with it for the first time.” ―School Library Journal, starred review

“Great White Shark Adventure” by James O. Fraioli — “This series opener will appeal most to young shark and science enthusiasts.” ― Booklist

“Green Lantern: Alliance” By Minh Le — “Tai Pham struggles with balancing school, his work in the family business, his friendships, and his new Green Lantern responsibilities. But Kid Flash arrives on the scene to become the super-hero partner Tai just might need.” — Amazon.com

“Hawai’i Sea Turtle Rescue” by James O. Fraioli — “Dive deep into this colorful and informative graphic novel adventure that brings readers up close and personal with the sea creatures of the vast and beautiful Pacific Ocean. Along the way, kids will also see how pollution and climate change can impact entire underwater ecosystems and find actionable steps that they can take to reduce waste and protect these precious reefs.” — Amazon.com

“I Survived the Nazi Invasion, 1944” by Lauren Tarshis — “… Lauren Tarshis’s New York Times bestselling I Survived series takes on vivid new life in this explosive graphic novel edition. Includes nonfiction back matter with historical photos and facts about World War II and the Holocaust.” — Amazon.com

“Investigators: Heist and Seek” by John Patrick Green — “Mango and Brash go undercover and under canvas as internationally renowned painters to expose a crook who has truly mastered the art of CRIME! Can they recover the missing masterpieces and save the city art museum’s fundraising gala before it’s too late…and they run out of appetizers? Find out in this latest pièce de résistance of action-packed illustrated fun.” — Amazon.com

“Invisible” by Christina Diaz Gonzalez & Gabriela Epstein — “Invisible celebrates individuality and community while transcending language barriers.” – Bookpage, starred review

“Journey Under the Arctic” by James O. Fraioli — “Join the team on this deep-sea expedition, and learn how the changing climate affects the ocean and its inhabitants, and discover what you can do to help save the planet!” — Amazon.com

“Leon the Extraordinary” by Jamar Nicholas — “In the city where Leon lives, superheroes — and supervillains — are commonplace. So how does an ordinary kid like Leon, who has no superpowers himself, become the superhero he wants to be? When all his classmates suddenly become obsessed with a new phone app that turns them into zombies, Leon gets his chance to prove that using his brain and following his heart can save the day.” — Amazon.com

“Miles Morales: Stranger Tides” by Justin A. Reynolds — “Miles Morales has just about gotten used to this being Spider-Man thing. Keeping Brooklyn safe, taking down bad guys, and finishing his homework―he’s got this! But when Spider-Man is invited to a launch for a brand-new video game, things go sideways fast. Anyone who plays the game is frozen, and it’s all because of a villain named the Stranger. He’s judged humanity and found it lacking, and his idea of justice is extreme.” — Amazon.com

“My Aunt is a Monster” by Reimena Yee —  “Safia is an irresistible lead, and her innate sense of wonder and longing for adventure… is heartwarming to the very last page.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Nat Enough” by Maria Scrivan — “What elevates Maria Scrivan’s graphic novel is the refreshing honesty with which it approaches its subject matter. The tone is instructive but not preachy, as Natalie develops her talents as a cartoonist and discovers her individuality, which brings her not only the acceptance of others but, more importantly, self-acceptance.” — Financial Times

“Nico Bravo and the Cellar Dwellers” by Mike Cavallaro — “Orcus mistakenly unleashes a dangerous ‘Misery’ from the God of Misfortune’s pouch, threatening everyone in the Supply Shop, but also discovers the missing link between Nico, the Unicorn Wars, and Reality itself! What will happen to Nico and his friends when all their troubles converge in a desperate battle for the fate of the Universe?” — Amazon.com

“Nico Bravo and the Hound of Hades” by Mike Cavallaro — “But Nico’s world is about to be turned upside down, and it’s all thanks his latest customer: Eowulf, the pint-size descendant of the monster slayer Beowulf. Determined to carry on the family business, this would-be warrior plans to slay Cerberus, the terrifying, three-headed hound of Hades. There’s just one problem―Cerberus is the only thing preventing the hordes of the Underworld from entering the land of the living. Can Nico stop Eowulf from unleashing a zombie apocalypse?” — Amazon.com

“Nico Bravo and the Trial of Vulcan” by Mike Cavallaro — “Awesome fight sequences, imaginative onomatopoeia, and nonstop hilarity make for a brightly colored, fast-paced saga…Another on-brand entry in this fun, melting pot of mythologies.”―School Library Journal

“Prunella and the Cursed Skull Ring” by Matthew Loux — “This fun and spooky adventure has a twist that readers do not want to miss, and it serves as an effective and playful reminder to not judge based on appearances, encouraging young readers to be their most authentic selves.”―Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books

“Shark Princess” by Nidhi Chanani — “A finny, funny foray that encourages inclusivity even when it comes to play.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Sir Ladybug” by Corey R. Tabor — “Visual humor, tongue-in-cheek declarations, and knock-knock jokes add to the fun absurdity of a story that subverts the natural phenomenon of a bird eating a bug. An endearing testament to the joys of friendship.” — Kirkus Reviews

“Sir Ladybug and the Bookworms” by Corey R. Tabor — “Tabor keeps the laughs coming in this new addition to his wonderful graphic-reader series. Though the bookish jokes and underlying message about everyone being welcome at the library will make it a particular favorite among librarians, kids will get a kick out of the story’s elevation of a common scenario…into a full-blown quest.” — Booklist

“Sir Ladybug and the Queen Bee” by Corey R. Tabor -“A gentle but fiercely loyal ladybug knight is joined by his faithful herald (a roly-poly bug who gets a little nervous sometimes but loves to loudly tell anyone who’ll listen how great his friends are) and his steed/squire (a snail with a surprisingly spacious shell and a love of adventure) in Tabor’s first two installments of a graphic-novel series for the early-reader set. …” — The Horn Book-

“Smaller Sister” by Maggie Edkins Willis — “The accessible tone and format allow a difficult topic to be gently revealed with painful honesty balanced by humor and silliness… Compassionately approaches the stigma and mystery surrounding eating disorders.” ―Kirkus, starred review

“The Bad Guys in the Others?!” by Aaron Blabey — “This book instantly joins the classic ranks of Captain Underpants and The Stinky Cheese Man. We challenge anyone to read this and keep a straight face.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“The Cardboard Kingdom” by Chad Sell — “Readers may be inspired to craft their own cardboard kingdom after finishing the book. A must-have.”—School Library Journal, starred review

“The Cool Code” by Deirdre Langeland — “A humorous exploration of cracking the middle school social code for anyone craving more personified snarky llamas in their lives.” — School Library Journal

“The First Cat in Space Ate Pizza” by Mac Barnett — “Readers looking for the outer space high jinks and gentle humor of Brockington’s Catstronauts and the imaginative and fantastical worldbuilding of Andrews’s This Was Our Pact need look no further than this laugh-out-loud tale of the first cat in space.” — School Library Journal (starred review)

“The Wondrous Wonders” by Camille Jourdy — “This is a must-buy for any library, packed with humor and heart.” ―School Library Journal

“Wings of Fire: Moon Rising” by Tui Sutherland — “Peace has finally settled on the kingdom of Pyrrhia. The former “dragonets of destiny” have started an academy for young dragons like themselves. One promising student, Moonwatcher, begins to discover her own secret powers and must decide if she should use them when the academy is threatened.” — THE HORN BOOK, c2015.

YOUNG ADULT FICTION

“Anne of Greenville” by Mariko Tamaki — “Every page of this glittery disco ball of a book explodes with imagination, effervescence, and joy ― prepare to find a kindred spirit in this thoroughly modern Anne Shirley.”―Sarah Kuhn, author of From Little Tokyo, with Love

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

“A Quick & Easy Guide to Asexuality” by Molly Muldoon & Will Hernandez — “This is a clear-cut primer for readers looking to support an ace person in their own life or those questioning their own identity.” ― Publishers Weekly

“Arden High: Twelfth Grade Night” by Molly Booth — “High school pranks, youthful dialogue, and a bright color palette make for a fun and inviting comedy to dive into, and a charismatic supporting cast offers plenty of material for more Shakespearean hijinks in future volumes.” ―The Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books (starred review)

“Coming Back” by Jessi Zarbarsky — “A beautiful story of two young women who are so focused on proving they’re meant to be together that they end up hurting each other in the process. This gorgeous graphic novel is an LGTBQ+ romance about young love and how it can grow into something strong no matter what obstacles get in the way.” — Amazon.com

“Demon in the Wood” by Leigh Bardugo & Dani Pendergast — “An absolutely vital addition to the Shadow and Bone world…centering on the Darkling when he was just a boy, this tragic and beautiful story adds layers to the villain we know and the scared child he once was.” ― Nerdist

“Dinosaur Sanctuary” by Itaru Kinoshita — “A richly detailed manga about a rookie zookeeper learning how to care for dinosaurs of all shapes and sizes, sure to delight dinosaur lovers!” — Amazon.com

“Giantess: The Story of the Girl who Traveled the World in Search of Freedom” by J. C. Deveney — “A giant baby girl is found and adopted by a local family who bring her back to their village. She grows to become an even bigger giant, learning life’s lessons complicated even further by her enormous size and uniqueness. Can she weather a society that faces her with frightened hostility and prejudice to find live and, ultimately, the freedom to be herself? A wonderous, fantastical tale of feminism, difference, love, freedom, and the quest to be oneself.” — Publisher Annotation:

“Lore of Olympus: Volume Three” by Rachel Smythe — “If eyes could eat, [Lore Olympus] would be a feast. Smythe’s artistic style features bright washes of color and bold, suggestive lines. . . . It’s paced as a soap opera, all drawn-out tensions and long-simmering secrets, and I, for one, am thrilled to be along for the ride.”—New York Times Book Review

“Passport” by Sophia Glock — “A rare peek behind the curtain into life as the daughter of U.S. intelligence officers, this is a story full of secrets that expertly unfold one by one. …”―School Library Journal

“The Heartstopper Yearbook” by Alice Oseman — “Realistic yet uplifting, this tale of self-discovery will make readers’ hearts skip a beat.” — School Library Journal

“Tuki: Fight for Fire” by Jeff Smith — “Fans of classic adventure will not be disappointed… Smith (BONE) goes prehistoric in this fabulously drawn anthropological fantasy…. the characters and scenery remain consistently stunning to gaze at, page after page.” — PUBLISHERS WEEKLY

YOUNG ADULT NON-FICTION

“Braiding Sweetgrass for Young Adults: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants” by Robin Wall Kimmerer — “With informative sidebars, reflection questions, and art from illustrator Nicole Neidhardt, Braiding Sweetgrass for Young Adults brings Indigenous wisdom, scientific knowledge, and the lessons of plant life to a new generation.” — Amazon.com

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – JULY 2022

ADULT FICTION

“Hostage” by Clare Mackintosh — “Fiendishly clever. Mackintosh takes domestic suspense to new heights in this tale of a kidnapped child, hijacked plane, and two parents’ desperate fight to save their family.” ― Lisa Gardner, #1 New York Times bestselling author

“Life Sentences” by Billy O’Callaghan — “Billy O’Callaghan uses a trio of voices in his poignant novel Life Sentences as three generations of an Irish family probe a legacy of poverty and war. ….powerful.”
New York Times

“Montauk” by Nicola Harrison — “Glittering galas, lavish living, and the spoils of hedonism crash against the lush, wild, primitive beauty of an Atlantic Coastal fishing village, creating a perfect storm. Caught between the two worlds, one woman must discover who she truly is, even if it means losing everything in the process. Montauk is a stunning debut by a gifted storyteller.” – Erika Robuck, national bestselling author of Hemingway’s Girl

“The Bookshop of Second Chances” by Jackie Fraser — “Humor and charm abound. . . . [This] love story hits the spot.”—Publishers Weekly

“The Lamplighters” by Emma Stonex — “Superbly accomplished…The Lamplighters is a whodunnit, horror novel, ghost story and fantastically gripping psychological investigation rolled into one. It is also a pitch-perfect piece of writing.” —The Guardian (London)

“The Survivors” by Jane Harper — “As always, Harper skillfully evokes the landscape as she weaves a complicated, elegant web, full of long-buried secrets ready to come to light.” ―New York Times Book Review

ADULT MYSTERY

“Hatchet Island” by Paul Doiron — “Doiron paints a complex portrait of coastal Maine…Fans of C.J. Box’s Joe Pickett mysteries, which also star an indomitable game warden, will particularly enjoy this gripping tale.” —Bookpage

“The Bitterroots” by C. J. Box — “An appealing new heroine, a fast-moving plot, and a memorably nightmarish family make this one of Box’s ” ― Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

ADULT NON-FICTION

“Nala’s World: One Man, His Rescue Cat, and a Bike Ride around the Globe” by Dean Nicholson — “There are moments of tension, like when Nala can’t be found for a whole morning, and profundity . . . The writing is more like people you just met at a hostel telling you about their travels after a few pints. . . Nicholson is at his best when he tells the story of a man finding a sense of purpose from an unlikely (and adorable) source…charming.” ―New York Times Book Review

“Watching Darkness Fall: FDR, His Ambassadors, and the Rise of Adolf Hitler” by David McKean — “In new book Watching Darkness Fall, former US ambassador David McKean illustrates how antisemitism, apathy, and internal politics set America back in the war against Germany.” ―Times of Israel

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“A Life in Light: Meditations on Impermanence” by Mary Pipher — “For psychologist Pipher, the light found in nature, caring relationships, work, and books has always been the key to happiness. In this beautifully written memoir, her memories of childhood in Nebraska are vivid and poignant. . . . This lovely book teaches gentle lessons on gratitude and celebrating life.” ―Booklist, starred review

“Watching Darkness Fall: FDR, His Ambassadors, and the Rise of Adolf Hitler” by David McKean — “In new book Watching Darkness Fall, former US ambassador David McKean illustrates how antisemitism, apathy, and internal politics set America back in the war against Germany.” ―Times of Israel

PICTURE BOOK

“Better Than New: A Recycle Tale” by Robert Broder

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

Lore Olympus: Volume 2″ by Rachel Smythe — “Sensitive and elegant . . . Beautiful artwork and compelling characters [take] the forefront of this romantic, tech-savvy retelling of Greek mythology.”—Booklist

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – JUNE 2022

ADULT FICTION

” Bad Actors” by Mick Herron — “An outstanding mix of arch humor, superb characterizations, and trenchant political observations.”
Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

“Book Lovers” by Emily Henry — “[Book Lovers] is multilayered and the characters’ familial challenges are complex. By both playing to and overtly subverting romance tropes and archetypes like the high-powered big city woman who neglects her family and the life-affirming power of small-town life, this novel delivers an insightful comedic meditation on love, family and going your own way.”—NPR

“Five Tuesdays in Winter” by Lily King — “Lily King isn’t afraid of big emotional subjects: desire and grief, longing and love, growth and self-acceptance. But she eschews high drama for the immersive quiet of the everyday… Here we inhabit the worlds of authors and mothers, children and friends; we experience their lives in clear, graceful prose that swells with generous possibility. This is a book for writers and lovers, a book about storytelling itself, a book for all of us.”—Washington Post

“Girl in Ice” by Erica Ferencik — “Girl in Ice is a lot of things: a psychological suspense novel, a linguistic thriller and a scientific puzzle . . . Ferencik describes the Arctic topography with a poet’s awe, and some of her set-pieces—the procession of a huge herd of caribou, an Arctic dive gone badly awry—are breathtaking… A singular sensation.” —Wall Street Journal

“Harsh Times” by Mario Vargas Llosa — “[A] vivid story centered on the U.S.-backed 1954 coup in Guatemala . . . History here gets a compelling human face through an artist’s dramatic brilliance.” ―Kirkus Reviews (Starred Review)

“Honor” by Thrity Umrigar — “Umrigar excels in her juxtaposition of the contrasts between the tech hub image of contemporary India and the deep religious divisions that continue to wrack rural regions . . . This is a thought-provoking portrait of an India that ‘felt inexpressibly large—as well as small and provincial enough to choke.’” —Booklist

“Horse” by Geraldine Brooks — “With exceptional characterizations, Pulitzer Prize–winner Brooks tells an emotionally impactful tale . . . [The] settings are pitch-perfect, and the story brings to life the important roles filled by Black horsemen in America’s past. Brooks also showcases the magnificent beauty and competitive spirit of Lexington himself.” — Booklist (starred review)

“Lessons in Chemistry” by Bonnie Garmus — “In Garmus’s debut novel, a frustrated chemist finds herself at the helm of a cooking show that sparks a revolution. Welcome to the 1960s, where a woman’s arsenal of tools was often limited to the kitchen—and where Elizabeth Zott is hellbent on overturning the status quo one meal at a time.” —New York Times

“Minus Me” by Mameve Medwed — “Medwed’s lovely novel of marriage, motherhood, love and loss is so…A timely reminder that in the worst of times, we sometimes rediscover the very best of ourselves.”
Jodi Picoult, New York Times bestselling author of A Spark of Light

“Remarkably Bright Creatures” by Shelby Van Pelt — “Remarkably Bright Creatures [is] an ultimately feel-good but deceptively sensitive debut about what it feels like to have love taken from you, only to find it again in the most unexpected places. . . . Memorable and tender.” — Washington Post 

“Sea of Tranquility” by Emily St. John Mandel — “A time-travel puzzle… Mandel’s prose is beautiful but unfussy; some chapters are compressed into a few poetic lines. The story moves quickly… In the end, the novel’s interlocking plot resolves beautifully, making for a humane and moving time-travel story, as well as a meditation on loneliness and love.” —BookPage, starred

“Seven Steeples” by Sara Baume — “Seven Steeples is one of the most beautiful novels I have ever read….Baume’s descriptions of landscape are lovelier than I can express; you simply have to read them yourself.” — New York Times Book Review

“Sparring Partners” by John Grisham — “Jake Brigance is called upon to help his old friend, disgraced former attorney Mack Stafford, make his return; young death row inmate Cody Wallace has one final request just several hours before execution; two young attorney brothers, Kirk and Rusty Malloy, look to Diantha Bradshaw to help save their once prosperous firm which they inherited from their father.” — Baker & Taylor

“Suspects” by Danielle Steel — “Theodora Morgan, fashion royalty and one of the most successful businesswomen in the world, forms an instant connection with a man who, unbeknownst to her, is a CIA agent sent to protect her from the very same people involved in the kidnapping of her husband and son, which ended in tragedy.” — Baker & Taylor

“Take My Hand” by Dolen Perkins-Valdez — “Perhaps the most notable of this book’s gifts are its deft packaging of history and its quiet nod—in the juxtaposition of timelines—to the reproductive oppression haunting Black women to this day. Like the most effective education, though, it feels that the information is streaming through the heart, awakening it and inspiring it to action.”—San Francisco Chronicle

“The Forgotten Life of Eva Gordon” by Linda MacKillop –“[A] touching debut. . . . MacKillop takes the pain of aging and regret and infuses it with soul and a touch of humor. This auspicious first outing tugs at the heartstrings.” ― Publishers Weekly

“The Island” by Adrian McKinty — “One of this summer’s best standalone thrillers.” ―The Boston Globe

“The Lioness” by Chris Bohjalian — “[A] devastatingly cunning suspense novel… Bohjalian does a superb job of judiciously rolling out information of how past transgressions may have led to the heart-stopping episodes of chaos and carnage as the shocking, twist-filled plot builds up to the revelation of ‘the real reasons for the safari nightmare.’ This brilliant whydunit is not to be missed.” —Publishers Weekly, starred 

“The Lunar Housewife” by Caroline Woods — “An elegant novel of political and cultural suspense. . . the Cold War intrigue it conjures is gripping, and Louise’s dilemmas and adventures will hold sympathetic readers in thrall.”
–The Wall Street Journal

“The Murder of Mr. Wickham” by Claudia Gray — “Had Jane Austen sat down to write a country house murder mystery, this is exactly the book she would have written. Devotees of Austen’s timeless novels will get the greatest possible pleasure from this wonderful book. Immense fun and beautifully observed. Delicious!” —Alexander McCall Smith

“The Paris Apartment” by Lucy Foley — “But it’s not only the intelligent and riveting storyline or the carefully conceived and fully developed characters that elevates this book far above mundane thrillers. Foley’s precise prose rings with echoes of her British background and the elegance of her French setting. … With confidence and cunning, Foley provides pleasures that chill as they captivate.” — Fredericksburg Free Lance-Star

“The Paris Bookseller” by Karri Maher — “Kerri Maher’s The Paris Bookseller is a worthy homage to Sylvia Beach and a love letter to all bookstores, libraries, and the passionate and committed women who run them.” —New York Journal of Books

“The Sweetness of Water” by Nathan Harris — “Deeply moving… Harris’s ambitious debut explores the aftermath of the Emancipation Proclamation in rural Georgia… Harris peoples the small community with well-developed characters… [He] writes in intelligent, down-to-earth prose and shows a keen understanding of his characters.”―Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“The Twilight World” by Werner Herzog — “From the true story of a WWII soldier who kept up the fight until 1974, legendary filmmaker Herzog distills a brooding, poetic novella . . . Herzog, ever in pursuit of deeper truths, sees in Onoda’s predicament an all-too-ordinary tendency to subordinate facts to master narratives. —Booklist

“The Viscount Who Loved Me” by Julia Quinn — “Quinn is . . . a romance master. [She] has created a family so likable and attractive, a community so vibrant and engaging, that we want to crawl into the pages and know them.”  — NPR Books

ADULT MYSTERY

“Dream Town” by David Baldacci — “Baldacci paints a vivid picture of the not-so-distant era . . . The 1950s weren’t the fabled good old days, but they’re fodder for gritty crime stories of high ideals and lowlifes, of longing and disappointment, and all the trouble a PI can handle. Well-done crime fiction. Baldacci nails the noir.”―Kirkus, Starred Review

“The Investigator” by John Sandford — “The Investigator is a procedural action thriller in which the technical sleuthing only heightens the tension. Letty is such a capable character, and Mr. Sandford such a fine tactician, it would seem incomprehensible and even cruel to deny readers a swift follow-up.”–Wall Street Journal 

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“Pathological: The True Story of Six Misdiagnoses” by Sarah Fay — “A] fiery manifesto of a memoir.” — New York Times Book Review

“His Name is George Floyd: One Man’s Life and the Struggle for Racial Justice” by Robert Samuels — “Writing with cogency and compassion, the authors free Floyd from the realm of iconography, restoring his humanity . . . A brilliant biography, history book, and searing indictment of this country’s ongoing failure to eradicate systemic racism.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review 

“Lost & Found: A Memoir” by Kathryn Schulz — “Deeply felt. More than a reflection on the loss of a parent. It is about the idea of loss in general and the passage of time. Fresh and evocative . . . a poignant, loving, wise, and comforting meditation on grief from both a personal and collective perspective.” —Booklist (starred review)

ADULT NON-FICTION

“Against All Odds: A True Story of Ultimate Courage and Survival in World War II” by Alex Kershaw — “Against All Odds achieves a pitch-perfect balance between a ground view of combat and the seismic forces that drew men like [Maurice] Britt and [Audie] Murphy to the killing grounds of Europe. Its prose is sharp, efficient and entertaining, its characters thoroughly human.”—The Wall Street Journal

“Atlas of the Heart: Mapping Meaningful Connections & the Language of Human Experience” by Brene Brown — “…Brown takes us on a journey through eighty-seven of the emotions and experiences that define what it means to be human. As she maps the necessary skills and an actionable framework for meaningful connection, she gives us the language and tools to access a universe of new choices and second chances—a universe where we can share and steward the stories of our bravest and most heartbreaking moments with one another in a way that builds connection.” — Random House, Inc.

“Embrace Fearlessly: The Burning World: Essays” by Barry Holstun Lopez — “Altogether, the pieces are honest and searching, engaging readers in the largest of questions: How do we live in the world? How do we see it? How do we protect it? . . . A sterling valediction. Lopez’s many followers will treasure this book.”—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“How the World Really Works: The Science Behind How We Got Here and Where We’re Going” by Vaclav Smil — “You can agree or disagree with Smil—accept or doubt his ‘just the facts’ posture—but you probably shouldn’t ignore him. . . In Smil’s provocative but perceptive view, unrealistic notions about carbon reduction are partly, and ironically, attributable to the very productivity that societies achieved by substituting machine work, powered by fossil fuels, for draft animals and human laborers.”—The Washington Post

“How to Tell a Story: The Essential Guide to Memorable Storytelling From the Moth” by Meg Bowles — “Inspiring . . . This book . . . provides everything readers need to share their own personal narratives.”—Booklist

“Lakes: Their Birth, Life, and Death” by John Richard Saylor — “Saylor delivers science in a layperson’s language to detail their forms, how they’re created, how they’re miraculously sustained, and, yes, how they die. Revelations abound.”—Booklist

“Last Call at the Hotel Imperial: The Reporters Who Took on a World at War” by Deborah Cohen — “In her engrossing account of this era and the people who did more than simply report facts, Cohen successfully interweaves international events with personal histories, creating a narrative that is well-crafted and comprehensively researched. . . . The resulting history is both unique and memorable. —Library Journal (starred review)

“Makhno: Ukrainian Freedom Fighter” by Philippe Thirault — “In early 20th century Ukraine, anarchist Nestor Makhno, the son of peasants, was among the most heroic and colorful figures of the Russian Revolution, encouraging his people to find and embrace social and economic self-determination. This is his story, of a military strategist who tirelessly defied both the Bolsheviks and the Germans to protect his homeland.” — Amazon.com

“On Task: How Our Brains Get Things Done” by David Badre –“On Task is a stimulating, enjoyable read for anyone interested in brain function, particularly if you want to understand how researchers are attempting to unravel some of the biggest mysteries of them all: how humans think, how they are successful when confronted with new challenges and how prefrontal cortex might contribute to that success.”—Masud Husain, Brain

“River of the Gods” by Candace Millard — “Millard’s research and very readable storytelling are admirable. . . Ultimately, the identity of the person who first discovered the source of the White Nile may be a trivial matter. Ms. Millard conscientiously investigates the issue, of course, but River of the Gods is compelling because she does justice to the psyches and behavior of Burton and Speke—keenly flawed but enthralling, sometimes marvelous people.” — Wall Street Journal

“Sidelined: How Women Manage & Mismanage Their Health” by Susan Salenger — “A well-written and empowering work about the challenges facing female patients.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Somewhere We are Human: Authentic Voices on Migration, Survival and New Beginnings” edited by Reyna Grande and Sonia Guinansaca — “Wide-ranging yet consistently affecting, these pieces offer a crucial and inspired survey of the immigrant experience in America.” — Publishers Weekly

“The Complete Guide to Food Allergies in Adults and Children” by Scott H. Sicherer — “An outstanding, comprehensive, easily understandable, and up-to-date resource for people with food allergies, as well as their parents and caregivers.” — Anna Nowak-Wegrzyn, MD, PhD, New York University Grossman School of Medicine

“The Flag, the Cross, and the Station Wagon: A Graying American Looks Back at his Suburban Boyhood and Wonders What the Hell Happened” by Bill McKibben — “Adept at factual storytelling and connecting the dots, earnest, caring, and funny, McKibben dovetails personal reckonings with an astute elucidation of our social justice and environmental crises, arguing wisely that facing the truth about our past is the only way forward to a more just and sustainable future.” ―Booklist, starred review

“The Greatest Polar Expedition of All Time: The Arctic Mission to the Epicenter of Climate Change” by Markus Rex — “This marvelous book brings us aboard a unique 21st-century Arctic expedition—science-driven, multi-national, unprecedented—as it sails into the epicenter of the worsening climate crisis. For anyone concerned about global warming—and that should be all of us —this book is essential reading. A contemporary classic!”
Ken McGoogan, author of Fatal Passage: The Story of John Rae, The Arctic Hero Time Forgot and Dead Reckoning: The Untold Story of the Northwest Passage

“The Insect Crisis: The Fall of the Tiny Empires That Run the World” by Oliver Milman — “In this well-researched, engagingly written, and refreshingly measured book, Oliver Milman reveals the profound and complex implications of insect decline. A necessary and timely wake-up call full of fascinating and often unexpected detail.” ― Hugh Raffles, author of Insectopedia

“The Last Days of the Dinosaurs: An Asteroid, Extinction, and the Beginning of the World” by Riley Black — “A real-life, natural history page-turning drama that is necessary reading for almost anyone interested in the history of life.” ―Library Journal, starred review

“The Savory Baker: 150 Creative Recipes, From Classic to Modern” by America’s Test Kitchen — “Baking is about a lot more than just desserts. This unique collection, one of the few to focus solely on the savory side of baking, explores a multitude of flavor possibilities. Get inspired by creative twists like gochujang-filled puff pastry pinwheels or feta-studded dill-zucchini bread. And sample traditional baked goods from around the world, from Chinese lop cheung bao to Brazilian pão de quejo.” — Annotation

“The Woodchuck Travels through the Garden Seasons” by Ron Krupp — “This seasoned Vermont gardener ….groups topics and plants through the seasons, interspersed with his brand of humor and art and quotes he has found relevant and inspiring. If you’re a gardener in the Green Mountain State, or similar climate, you’re bound to pick up some tips or different views on diverse topics from composting to climate change, from pesticides to poetry to publications to pollinators.” — Dr. Leonard Payne Perry – Horticulture Professor Emeritus, University of Vermont

“Unmasking Autism: Discovering the New Faces of Neurodiversity” by Devon Price — “Price’s accessible and compassionate writing shines, and readers will feel encouraged to embrace a new understanding of themselves. Its potential to help masked autistic adults, especially those from systemically marginalized backgrounds, makes this book essential for most collections.”—Library Journal (starred review)

“Vermont Heritage: Essays on the Green Mountain History, 1770-1920” by H. Nicholas Muller III and J. Kevin Graffagnino — “It includes essays on Vermont historiography, Ethan and Ira Allen, early Vermont printing, eighteenth-century Vermont politics, the War of 1812, Vermont’s reaction to the 1837–38 Patriote Rebellion, and aspects of Victorian Vermont. The authors offer reminiscences and reflections on their lengthy Vermont careers in a joint Introduction.” — Vermont Research Books

“Write for Your Life” by Anne Quindlen — The #1 New York Times best-selling novelist and author of A Short Guide to a Happy Life, using examples past, present and future, shows how writing connects us, to ourselves and those we cherish—and issues a clarion call to pick up the pen, and find yourself.” — Atlas Publishing

“You Don’t Know Us Negroes: And Other Essays” by Zora Neale Hurston — “This volume enables readers both steeped in and new to Hurston to discover her acerbic wit, her crisp prose, and the breadth of her artistic ability and interests …. an invaluable nonfiction companion to the collection of Hurston’s short stories.” — Booklist

PARENTING

“How to Raise an Antiracist” by Ibram X. Kendi — “A readable and approachable guide . . . Because of its scope, nearly all readers will come away from Kendi’s message more aware and having found a point of resonance in their own lives. Best-selling Kendi is an antiracism trailblazer and parents, educators, and everyone else who cares for children will seek his guidance.”—Booklist (starred review)

PICTURE BOOK

“You’re in Good Paws” by Maureen Fergus

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Whales: Diving Into the Unknown” by Casey Zakroff — “Zip, an enthusiastic beaked whale, is eager to share everything he can about whale pods by broadcasting his very own undersea podcast! He will travel across the global ocean interviewing a diverse assortment of whales and dolphins about their amazing behaviors and habitats, as well as their interactions with the human world. Can this one small whale tell the story of the whole ocean and the interconnectivity that affects us all?” — Baker & Taylor

YA FICTION

“We Contain Multitudes” by Sarah Henstra — “This is an absolutely extraordinary work of fiction that proves the epistolary novel is an art form. Kurl and Jo are characters to die for, emotionally compelling and empathetic. Their quotidian lives are riveting and their story unforgettable…not to be missed.”―Booklist, starred review