Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – AUGUST 2022

ADULT FICTION

“Chrysalis: A Thriller” by Lincoln Child – “…It’s what happens along the way that makes the [book] so enjoyable: the false leads, blind alleys, and bad assumptions; the slow accumulation of facts that points to a solution that cannot possibly be true—except that it must be. An intriguing, suspenseful, and very satisfying thriller.”—Booklist

“Flying Solo” by Linda Holmes — “A refreshing reminder that there’s no one-size-fits-all mold for a relationship, and that fulfillment can be achieved many ways.”—The Washington Post

“Nightcrawling” by Leila Mottley — “A work of devastating social realism . . . executed with relentless momentum . . . A powerful discourse on the dehumanizing effects policing can have on marginalized communities, bodies, and minds (and especially on Black women).” —Library Journal(starred)

“One Two Three: A Novel” by Laurie Frankel — “One Two Three is a compelling story about environmental injustice and the people caring for each other in a small community. Reading Laurie Frankel’s books change how we look at each other and the world.”―BookTrib

“Point Last Seen” by Christina Dodd — “When it comes to nerve-shredding, edge-of-your-seat suspense, Dodd consistently delivers the goods…Point Last Seen is a gobsmackingly great read.”—Booklist STARRED REVIEW

“The 6:30 Man” by David Baldacci — “After a cryptic murder, a former soldier-turned-entry-level analyst, who boards the 6:20 commuter train like clockwork, is forced into a clandestine investigation into his firm that takes him to the darkest corners of the country’s economic halls of power, rife with corruption, where a killer awaits.” — Atlas Publishing

“The It Girl” by Ruth Ware — “This exceptional psychological thriller from Ware probes how much one can trust others—and one’s self . . . . Alternating past and present chapters build toward a gripping denouement as nicely chosen details bring each character vividly to life. This showcases Ware’s gifts to the fullest.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“The Measure: A Novel” by Nikki Erlick — “A compelling, heart-breaking story of life and love with a perfect, elegant premise.” — Bridget Collins, bestselling author of The Binding

ADULT MYSTERY

“Escape” by James Patterson – “#1 New York Times bestselling detective Billy Harney of The Black Book is chasing down a billionaire crime boss and a prison escape artist while a young girl’s life hangs in the balance.” — Grand Central Publishing

“Local Gone Missing” by Fiona Barton – “A cleverly crafted puzzle that has emotional heft and social commentary as well as an intriguing web of mysteries.” — St. Louis Post-Dispatch

“Outside” by Ragnar Jonasson – “[An] excruciatingly slow-motion avalanche in which it’s obvious from the beginning that “something’s got to die before we finish this trip”; the only questions are who, how many, under what circumstances, and at whose hands….A shivery delight.” ―Kirkus Reviews

“The Drowning Sea” by Sarah Stewart — “Atmospheric… Taylor creates a rich and gothic atmosphere, with the ocean beating against the treacherous, wind-swept cliffs… The Drowning Sea’s gorgeous backdrop and stalwart sleuth will satisfy and impress mystery readers, particularly fans of traditional whodunits.” ―BookPage

ADULT NON-FICTION

Two Wheels Good: The History and Mystery of the Bicycle” by Jody Rosen — “A lively biography of a tool central to the greening of urban spaces. It’s also a fascinating, sweeping everyday explainer, moving from the bike’s 19th-century origins to its importance globally.”—Chicago Tribune

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Bridges: Engineering Masterpieces” by Dan Zettwooch — “Bea, Archie, Trudy and Spence, aka the BATS, travel around the world using every type of bridge imaginable, identifying the dangerous forces trying to bring these structures crashing down and how to defeat them through engineering.” — Atlas Publishing

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – JUNE 2022

ADULT FICTION

” Bad Actors” by Mick Herron — “An outstanding mix of arch humor, superb characterizations, and trenchant political observations.”
Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

“Book Lovers” by Emily Henry — “[Book Lovers] is multilayered and the characters’ familial challenges are complex. By both playing to and overtly subverting romance tropes and archetypes like the high-powered big city woman who neglects her family and the life-affirming power of small-town life, this novel delivers an insightful comedic meditation on love, family and going your own way.”—NPR

“Five Tuesdays in Winter” by Lily King — “Lily King isn’t afraid of big emotional subjects: desire and grief, longing and love, growth and self-acceptance. But she eschews high drama for the immersive quiet of the everyday… Here we inhabit the worlds of authors and mothers, children and friends; we experience their lives in clear, graceful prose that swells with generous possibility. This is a book for writers and lovers, a book about storytelling itself, a book for all of us.”—Washington Post

“Girl in Ice” by Erica Ferencik — “Girl in Ice is a lot of things: a psychological suspense novel, a linguistic thriller and a scientific puzzle . . . Ferencik describes the Arctic topography with a poet’s awe, and some of her set-pieces—the procession of a huge herd of caribou, an Arctic dive gone badly awry—are breathtaking… A singular sensation.” —Wall Street Journal

“Harsh Times” by Mario Vargas Llosa — “[A] vivid story centered on the U.S.-backed 1954 coup in Guatemala . . . History here gets a compelling human face through an artist’s dramatic brilliance.” ―Kirkus Reviews (Starred Review)

“Honor” by Thrity Umrigar — “Umrigar excels in her juxtaposition of the contrasts between the tech hub image of contemporary India and the deep religious divisions that continue to wrack rural regions . . . This is a thought-provoking portrait of an India that ‘felt inexpressibly large—as well as small and provincial enough to choke.’” —Booklist

“Horse” by Geraldine Brooks — “With exceptional characterizations, Pulitzer Prize–winner Brooks tells an emotionally impactful tale . . . [The] settings are pitch-perfect, and the story brings to life the important roles filled by Black horsemen in America’s past. Brooks also showcases the magnificent beauty and competitive spirit of Lexington himself.” — Booklist (starred review)

“Lessons in Chemistry” by Bonnie Garmus — “In Garmus’s debut novel, a frustrated chemist finds herself at the helm of a cooking show that sparks a revolution. Welcome to the 1960s, where a woman’s arsenal of tools was often limited to the kitchen—and where Elizabeth Zott is hellbent on overturning the status quo one meal at a time.” —New York Times

“Minus Me” by Mameve Medwed — “Medwed’s lovely novel of marriage, motherhood, love and loss is so…A timely reminder that in the worst of times, we sometimes rediscover the very best of ourselves.”
Jodi Picoult, New York Times bestselling author of A Spark of Light

“Remarkably Bright Creatures” by Shelby Van Pelt — “Remarkably Bright Creatures [is] an ultimately feel-good but deceptively sensitive debut about what it feels like to have love taken from you, only to find it again in the most unexpected places. . . . Memorable and tender.” — Washington Post 

“Sea of Tranquility” by Emily St. John Mandel — “A time-travel puzzle… Mandel’s prose is beautiful but unfussy; some chapters are compressed into a few poetic lines. The story moves quickly… In the end, the novel’s interlocking plot resolves beautifully, making for a humane and moving time-travel story, as well as a meditation on loneliness and love.” —BookPage, starred

“Seven Steeples” by Sara Baume — “Seven Steeples is one of the most beautiful novels I have ever read….Baume’s descriptions of landscape are lovelier than I can express; you simply have to read them yourself.” — New York Times Book Review

“Sparring Partners” by John Grisham — “Jake Brigance is called upon to help his old friend, disgraced former attorney Mack Stafford, make his return; young death row inmate Cody Wallace has one final request just several hours before execution; two young attorney brothers, Kirk and Rusty Malloy, look to Diantha Bradshaw to help save their once prosperous firm which they inherited from their father.” — Baker & Taylor

“Suspects” by Danielle Steel — “Theodora Morgan, fashion royalty and one of the most successful businesswomen in the world, forms an instant connection with a man who, unbeknownst to her, is a CIA agent sent to protect her from the very same people involved in the kidnapping of her husband and son, which ended in tragedy.” — Baker & Taylor

“Take My Hand” by Dolen Perkins-Valdez — “Perhaps the most notable of this book’s gifts are its deft packaging of history and its quiet nod—in the juxtaposition of timelines—to the reproductive oppression haunting Black women to this day. Like the most effective education, though, it feels that the information is streaming through the heart, awakening it and inspiring it to action.”—San Francisco Chronicle

“The Forgotten Life of Eva Gordon” by Linda MacKillop –“[A] touching debut. . . . MacKillop takes the pain of aging and regret and infuses it with soul and a touch of humor. This auspicious first outing tugs at the heartstrings.” ― Publishers Weekly

“The Island” by Adrian McKinty — “One of this summer’s best standalone thrillers.” ―The Boston Globe

“The Lioness” by Chris Bohjalian — “[A] devastatingly cunning suspense novel… Bohjalian does a superb job of judiciously rolling out information of how past transgressions may have led to the heart-stopping episodes of chaos and carnage as the shocking, twist-filled plot builds up to the revelation of ‘the real reasons for the safari nightmare.’ This brilliant whydunit is not to be missed.” —Publishers Weekly, starred 

“The Lunar Housewife” by Caroline Woods — “An elegant novel of political and cultural suspense. . . the Cold War intrigue it conjures is gripping, and Louise’s dilemmas and adventures will hold sympathetic readers in thrall.”
–The Wall Street Journal

“The Murder of Mr. Wickham” by Claudia Gray — “Had Jane Austen sat down to write a country house murder mystery, this is exactly the book she would have written. Devotees of Austen’s timeless novels will get the greatest possible pleasure from this wonderful book. Immense fun and beautifully observed. Delicious!” —Alexander McCall Smith

“The Paris Apartment” by Lucy Foley — “But it’s not only the intelligent and riveting storyline or the carefully conceived and fully developed characters that elevates this book far above mundane thrillers. Foley’s precise prose rings with echoes of her British background and the elegance of her French setting. … With confidence and cunning, Foley provides pleasures that chill as they captivate.” — Fredericksburg Free Lance-Star

“The Paris Bookseller” by Karri Maher — “Kerri Maher’s The Paris Bookseller is a worthy homage to Sylvia Beach and a love letter to all bookstores, libraries, and the passionate and committed women who run them.” —New York Journal of Books

“The Sweetness of Water” by Nathan Harris — “Deeply moving… Harris’s ambitious debut explores the aftermath of the Emancipation Proclamation in rural Georgia… Harris peoples the small community with well-developed characters… [He] writes in intelligent, down-to-earth prose and shows a keen understanding of his characters.”―Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“The Twilight World” by Werner Herzog — “From the true story of a WWII soldier who kept up the fight until 1974, legendary filmmaker Herzog distills a brooding, poetic novella . . . Herzog, ever in pursuit of deeper truths, sees in Onoda’s predicament an all-too-ordinary tendency to subordinate facts to master narratives. —Booklist

“The Viscount Who Loved Me” by Julia Quinn — “Quinn is . . . a romance master. [She] has created a family so likable and attractive, a community so vibrant and engaging, that we want to crawl into the pages and know them.”  — NPR Books

ADULT MYSTERY

“Dream Town” by David Baldacci — “Baldacci paints a vivid picture of the not-so-distant era . . . The 1950s weren’t the fabled good old days, but they’re fodder for gritty crime stories of high ideals and lowlifes, of longing and disappointment, and all the trouble a PI can handle. Well-done crime fiction. Baldacci nails the noir.”―Kirkus, Starred Review

“The Investigator” by John Sandford — “The Investigator is a procedural action thriller in which the technical sleuthing only heightens the tension. Letty is such a capable character, and Mr. Sandford such a fine tactician, it would seem incomprehensible and even cruel to deny readers a swift follow-up.”–Wall Street Journal 

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“Pathological: The True Story of Six Misdiagnoses” by Sarah Fay — “A] fiery manifesto of a memoir.” — New York Times Book Review

“His Name is George Floyd: One Man’s Life and the Struggle for Racial Justice” by Robert Samuels — “Writing with cogency and compassion, the authors free Floyd from the realm of iconography, restoring his humanity . . . A brilliant biography, history book, and searing indictment of this country’s ongoing failure to eradicate systemic racism.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review 

“Lost & Found: A Memoir” by Kathryn Schulz — “Deeply felt. More than a reflection on the loss of a parent. It is about the idea of loss in general and the passage of time. Fresh and evocative . . . a poignant, loving, wise, and comforting meditation on grief from both a personal and collective perspective.” —Booklist (starred review)

ADULT NON-FICTION

“Against All Odds: A True Story of Ultimate Courage and Survival in World War II” by Alex Kershaw — “Against All Odds achieves a pitch-perfect balance between a ground view of combat and the seismic forces that drew men like [Maurice] Britt and [Audie] Murphy to the killing grounds of Europe. Its prose is sharp, efficient and entertaining, its characters thoroughly human.”—The Wall Street Journal

“Atlas of the Heart: Mapping Meaningful Connections & the Language of Human Experience” by Brene Brown — “…Brown takes us on a journey through eighty-seven of the emotions and experiences that define what it means to be human. As she maps the necessary skills and an actionable framework for meaningful connection, she gives us the language and tools to access a universe of new choices and second chances—a universe where we can share and steward the stories of our bravest and most heartbreaking moments with one another in a way that builds connection.” — Random House, Inc.

“Embrace Fearlessly: The Burning World: Essays” by Barry Holstun Lopez — “Altogether, the pieces are honest and searching, engaging readers in the largest of questions: How do we live in the world? How do we see it? How do we protect it? . . . A sterling valediction. Lopez’s many followers will treasure this book.”—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“How the World Really Works: The Science Behind How We Got Here and Where We’re Going” by Vaclav Smil — “You can agree or disagree with Smil—accept or doubt his ‘just the facts’ posture—but you probably shouldn’t ignore him. . . In Smil’s provocative but perceptive view, unrealistic notions about carbon reduction are partly, and ironically, attributable to the very productivity that societies achieved by substituting machine work, powered by fossil fuels, for draft animals and human laborers.”—The Washington Post

“How to Tell a Story: The Essential Guide to Memorable Storytelling From the Moth” by Meg Bowles — “Inspiring . . . This book . . . provides everything readers need to share their own personal narratives.”—Booklist

“Lakes: Their Birth, Life, and Death” by John Richard Saylor — “Saylor delivers science in a layperson’s language to detail their forms, how they’re created, how they’re miraculously sustained, and, yes, how they die. Revelations abound.”—Booklist

“Last Call at the Hotel Imperial: The Reporters Who Took on a World at War” by Deborah Cohen — “In her engrossing account of this era and the people who did more than simply report facts, Cohen successfully interweaves international events with personal histories, creating a narrative that is well-crafted and comprehensively researched. . . . The resulting history is both unique and memorable. —Library Journal (starred review)

“Makhno: Ukrainian Freedom Fighter” by Philippe Thirault — “In early 20th century Ukraine, anarchist Nestor Makhno, the son of peasants, was among the most heroic and colorful figures of the Russian Revolution, encouraging his people to find and embrace social and economic self-determination. This is his story, of a military strategist who tirelessly defied both the Bolsheviks and the Germans to protect his homeland.” — Amazon.com

“On Task: How Our Brains Get Things Done” by David Badre –“On Task is a stimulating, enjoyable read for anyone interested in brain function, particularly if you want to understand how researchers are attempting to unravel some of the biggest mysteries of them all: how humans think, how they are successful when confronted with new challenges and how prefrontal cortex might contribute to that success.”—Masud Husain, Brain

“River of the Gods” by Candace Millard — “Millard’s research and very readable storytelling are admirable. . . Ultimately, the identity of the person who first discovered the source of the White Nile may be a trivial matter. Ms. Millard conscientiously investigates the issue, of course, but River of the Gods is compelling because she does justice to the psyches and behavior of Burton and Speke—keenly flawed but enthralling, sometimes marvelous people.” — Wall Street Journal

“Sidelined: How Women Manage & Mismanage Their Health” by Susan Salenger — “A well-written and empowering work about the challenges facing female patients.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Somewhere We are Human: Authentic Voices on Migration, Survival and New Beginnings” edited by Reyna Grande and Sonia Guinansaca — “Wide-ranging yet consistently affecting, these pieces offer a crucial and inspired survey of the immigrant experience in America.” — Publishers Weekly

“The Complete Guide to Food Allergies in Adults and Children” by Scott H. Sicherer — “An outstanding, comprehensive, easily understandable, and up-to-date resource for people with food allergies, as well as their parents and caregivers.” — Anna Nowak-Wegrzyn, MD, PhD, New York University Grossman School of Medicine

“The Flag, the Cross, and the Station Wagon: A Graying American Looks Back at his Suburban Boyhood and Wonders What the Hell Happened” by Bill McKibben — “Adept at factual storytelling and connecting the dots, earnest, caring, and funny, McKibben dovetails personal reckonings with an astute elucidation of our social justice and environmental crises, arguing wisely that facing the truth about our past is the only way forward to a more just and sustainable future.” ―Booklist, starred review

“The Greatest Polar Expedition of All Time: The Arctic Mission to the Epicenter of Climate Change” by Markus Rex — “This marvelous book brings us aboard a unique 21st-century Arctic expedition—science-driven, multi-national, unprecedented—as it sails into the epicenter of the worsening climate crisis. For anyone concerned about global warming—and that should be all of us —this book is essential reading. A contemporary classic!”
Ken McGoogan, author of Fatal Passage: The Story of John Rae, The Arctic Hero Time Forgot and Dead Reckoning: The Untold Story of the Northwest Passage

“The Insect Crisis: The Fall of the Tiny Empires That Run the World” by Oliver Milman — “In this well-researched, engagingly written, and refreshingly measured book, Oliver Milman reveals the profound and complex implications of insect decline. A necessary and timely wake-up call full of fascinating and often unexpected detail.” ― Hugh Raffles, author of Insectopedia

“The Last Days of the Dinosaurs: An Asteroid, Extinction, and the Beginning of the World” by Riley Black — “A real-life, natural history page-turning drama that is necessary reading for almost anyone interested in the history of life.” ―Library Journal, starred review

“The Savory Baker: 150 Creative Recipes, From Classic to Modern” by America’s Test Kitchen — “Baking is about a lot more than just desserts. This unique collection, one of the few to focus solely on the savory side of baking, explores a multitude of flavor possibilities. Get inspired by creative twists like gochujang-filled puff pastry pinwheels or feta-studded dill-zucchini bread. And sample traditional baked goods from around the world, from Chinese lop cheung bao to Brazilian pão de quejo.” — Annotation

“The Woodchuck Travels through the Garden Seasons” by Ron Krupp — “This seasoned Vermont gardener ….groups topics and plants through the seasons, interspersed with his brand of humor and art and quotes he has found relevant and inspiring. If you’re a gardener in the Green Mountain State, or similar climate, you’re bound to pick up some tips or different views on diverse topics from composting to climate change, from pesticides to poetry to publications to pollinators.” — Dr. Leonard Payne Perry – Horticulture Professor Emeritus, University of Vermont

“Unmasking Autism: Discovering the New Faces of Neurodiversity” by Devon Price — “Price’s accessible and compassionate writing shines, and readers will feel encouraged to embrace a new understanding of themselves. Its potential to help masked autistic adults, especially those from systemically marginalized backgrounds, makes this book essential for most collections.”—Library Journal (starred review)

“Vermont Heritage: Essays on the Green Mountain History, 1770-1920” by H. Nicholas Muller III and J. Kevin Graffagnino — “It includes essays on Vermont historiography, Ethan and Ira Allen, early Vermont printing, eighteenth-century Vermont politics, the War of 1812, Vermont’s reaction to the 1837–38 Patriote Rebellion, and aspects of Victorian Vermont. The authors offer reminiscences and reflections on their lengthy Vermont careers in a joint Introduction.” — Vermont Research Books

“Write for Your Life” by Anne Quindlen — The #1 New York Times best-selling novelist and author of A Short Guide to a Happy Life, using examples past, present and future, shows how writing connects us, to ourselves and those we cherish—and issues a clarion call to pick up the pen, and find yourself.” — Atlas Publishing

“You Don’t Know Us Negroes: And Other Essays” by Zora Neale Hurston — “This volume enables readers both steeped in and new to Hurston to discover her acerbic wit, her crisp prose, and the breadth of her artistic ability and interests …. an invaluable nonfiction companion to the collection of Hurston’s short stories.” — Booklist

PARENTING

“How to Raise an Antiracist” by Ibram X. Kendi — “A readable and approachable guide . . . Because of its scope, nearly all readers will come away from Kendi’s message more aware and having found a point of resonance in their own lives. Best-selling Kendi is an antiracism trailblazer and parents, educators, and everyone else who cares for children will seek his guidance.”—Booklist (starred review)

PICTURE BOOK

“You’re in Good Paws” by Maureen Fergus

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Whales: Diving Into the Unknown” by Casey Zakroff — “Zip, an enthusiastic beaked whale, is eager to share everything he can about whale pods by broadcasting his very own undersea podcast! He will travel across the global ocean interviewing a diverse assortment of whales and dolphins about their amazing behaviors and habitats, as well as their interactions with the human world. Can this one small whale tell the story of the whole ocean and the interconnectivity that affects us all?” — Baker & Taylor

YA FICTION

“We Contain Multitudes” by Sarah Henstra — “This is an absolutely extraordinary work of fiction that proves the epistolary novel is an art form. Kurl and Jo are characters to die for, emotionally compelling and empathetic. Their quotidian lives are riveting and their story unforgettable…not to be missed.”―Booklist, starred review

Categories
Highlighted New Arrivals

Wings of Fire: The Brightest Night by Tui Sutherland

“Sunny has always taken the Dragonet Prophecy very seriously, so Morrowseer’s devastating news changes everything–now she must forge a new identity, and find a way to stop the futile and destructive war between the dragon clans.” — Atlas Publishing

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – MAY 2022

ADULT FICTION

“Harmony Hill” by John S. Hall — “In 1941, sixteen-year-old Jubilant Brown is struggling to keep his family’s small dairy farm from going under. …Farming in Vermont is a hardscrabble existence requiring muscle and ingenuity, something Jubal is learning as he comes of age. He also faces the ins and outs of love as he navigates friendships with three very different, strong young women. …. Harmony Hill is an old-fashioned yarn about small-town life. Hayesville will capture your heart with its quirky characters who are much like the neighbors you’ve always known. And when the town is rocked by a terrible tragedy, it reveals the true colors of the townsfolk and their interwoven connections.” — Amazon.com

“House of Earth and Blood” by Sarah J. Maas — “A richly imagined tale spiced with snarky humor and smoldering romance.” ―Publishers Weekly

“The Liar’s Dictionary” by Eley Williams — “An audacious, idiosyncratic dual love story about how language and people intersect and connect, and about how far we’ll go to save what we’re passionate about…Showcases a delight in language that evokes both Nabokov and—more on point with its mix of playfulness, profundity, warmth, and heart—Ali Smith.” —NPR

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“From Hollywood with Love: The Rise and Fall (And Rise Again) of the Romantic Comedy” by Scott Meslow — “Meslow tells lots of engaging making of stories (for example, how Pretty Woman was transformed from a fallen-woman tragedy into a Disney fairy tale), but it’s his overarching theme, that romantic comedies are much more than lovey-dovey fluff, that really holds our interest.” — Booklist

“The Library: A Fragile History” by Andrew Pettegrew — “This sweeping history of libraries is outstanding…. A history of libraries from the ancient world to yesterday, it is fetchingly produced and scrupulously researched — a perfect gift for bibliophiles everywhere.”―Sunday Times

PARENTING

“The Addiction Inoculation: Raising Healthy Kids in a Culture of Dependence” by Jessica Lahey — “Lahey compassionately lays out the societal pressures that can result in toxic stress and aggressive behavior. . . . Foundational advice to steer young adults away from the urges and temptations that lead to substance abuse.” — Kirkus Reviews

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Shadow of the Bird” by Tim Porbert — “In the second installment of the award-winning, critically acclaimed Lightfall series, Bea and Cad continue their quest to stop Kest, the mythic bird who stole the sun. Perfect for middle grade fans of Amulet and Avatar the Last Airbender, Lightfall: Shadow of the Bird is another breathtaking journey into the magical world of Irpa, where epic battles and powerful creatures abound.” — Publisher’s Annotation

“Wings of Fire: The Brightest Night” by Tui Sutherland — “Sunny has always taken the Dragonet Prophecy very seriously, so Morrowseer’s devastating news changes everything–now she must forge a new identity, and find a way to stop the futile and destructive war between the dragon clans.” — Atlas Publishing

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

“A Quick & Easy Guide to Sex & Disability” by A. Andrews — “A great introduction to basic information many disabled people can use. With humor, real talk, and lovely illustrations featuring all kinds of bodies, this guide can help disabled people (and their partners) on their journey toward self-love, better communication, and confidence.” — Alice Wong, Founder and Director, Disability Visibility Project

YOUNG LOCAL AUTHORS

“I See a Der and a Fox” by Maddison

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – OCTOBER 2021

ADULT FICTION

“Civilizations” by Laurent Binet – “An ambitious and highly entertaining novel of revisionist history from the author of the international bestseller HHhH, Laurent Binet’s Civilizations is nothing less than a strangely believable counterfactual history of the modern world, fizzing with ideas about colonization, empire-building, and the eternal human quest for domination. It is an electrifying novel by one of Europe’s most exciting writers.” — McMillan Palgrave

“Cloud Cuckoo Land” by Anthony Doerr – “Doerr builds a community of readers and nature lovers that transcends the boundaries of time and space … This is just one of the many narrative miracles worked by the author as he brings a first-century story to its conclusion in 2146. As the pieces of this magical literary puzzle snap together, a flicker of hope is sparked for our benighted world.” Kirkus, starred review

“Crossroads” by Jonathan Franzen — “Franzen returns with a sweeping and masterly examination of the shifting culture of early 1970s America, the first in a trilogy . . . Throughout, Franzen exhibits his remarkable ability to build suspense through fraught interpersonal dynamics. It’s irresistible.” ―Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Light from Uncommon Stars” by Ryka Aoki — “Aoki’s novel is an exciting, wild web of an adventure, an unputdownable book about music, found family, and identity. Diving into the tough subjects, Aoki’s book emerges with a joyful, queer, radical ballad of a story. . .”―Booklist, starred review

“State of Terror” by Hilary Rodham Clinton and Louise Penny — “Consistently entertaining….Penny and Clinton demonstrate a sure hand at international intrigue and narrative pacing….The real key to ‘State of Terror,’ though, is its secret weapon: female friendship.” ― The Washington Post

“The Lincoln Highway” by Amor Towles — “[A] playfully thought-provoking novel . . . [Towles] juggles the pieces of his plot deftly, shifting from voice to voice, skirting sentimentality and quirkiness with a touch of wistful regret, and leading up to an ending that is bound to provoke discussion.” Booklist (starred)

ADULT MYSTERY

“Nerve Attack” by S. Lee Manning — “Manning writes with such authority about the shady world and shifting loyalties of the intelligence community, it’s a wonder her novels aren’t riddled with redactions. At once terrifying, unpredictable, and all too believable, NERVE ATTACK will leave you breathless.” –Chris Holm, Anthony award winning author of The Killing Kind.

“To Kill the Messenger” by Philip S. Cook — This is the story of Russell Griswold—an itinerant newspaper editor—who came to northern New Mexico after the Civil War to start a weekly newspaper in the small town of San Miguel. He hoped to earn a modest living and help build a thriving and vibrant community.

Griswold’s published comments on activities that he finds unlawful or inappropriate were often cruel and demeaning. Ultimately this leads to a sudden and violent attempt on his life.

There is any number of possible suspects whether aggrieved or not. … So, who would want to kill a newspaper editor?” — Blurb, Inc.

ADULT NON-FICTION

“My Grandmother’s Hands: Racialized Trauma and the Pathway to Mending Our Hearts and Bodies” by Resmaa Menakem — “My Grandmother’s Hands is full of wisdom and understanding. In it, Resmaa Menakem offers a new way to understand racism and, more importantly, to heal it. This book lays out a path to freedom and peace, first for individual readers, then for our culture as a whole. A must-read for everyone who cares about our country.”―Nancy Van Dyken, LP, LICSW, author of Everyday Narcissism

“Peril” by Bob Woodward and Robert Costa — “Woodward and Costa make a powerful case that America has had a narrow escape. It leaves all Americans, in particular the Republican Party, with some thinking to do”—Justin Webb, The Times, UK.

“To Save The People From Themselves”: The Emergence of American Judicial Review and the Transformation of the Constitutions” by Robert J. Steinfeld — “… Robert Steinfeld examines how the distinctive US form of constitutional review emerged from a background tradition in which legislatures and executives assessed constitutionality in their regular work. Combining institutional, political, and intellectual history, Professor Steinfeld shows how the transformation was both rapid and strongly contested. Seeing judicial review as part of a conservative counterrevolution against the democratic excesses of post-Revolutionary legislatures, this is an important new contribution to long-standing discussions about judicial review in the United States.” — Mark Tushnet, William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law Emeritus, Harvard Law School

“Voices from the Pandemic: Americans Tell Their Stories of Crisis, Courage and Resilience” by Eli Saslow — “Saslow has done a sterling job of capturing real people’s experiences of the start of the pandemic.” –Tampa Bay Times

VERMONT NON-FICTION

“Vermont History: Volume 89, No. 2, Summer/Fall 2021”

PARENTING

“Hunt, Gather, Parent: What Ancient Cultures Can Teach Us About the Lost Art of Raising Happy, Helpful Little Humans” by Michaeleen Doucleff, Ph. D. — “Hunt, Gather, Parent is full of smart ideas that I immediately wanted to force on my own kids. (I wish I’d read it at the start of the pandemic, when I made their chore charts.) Doucleff is a dogged reporter who’s good at observing families and breaking down what they’re doing.”
—Pamela Druckerman, The New York Times Book Review

“Parenting 4 Social Justice: Tips, Tools, and Inspiration for Conversations & Action with Kids” by Angela Berkfield — “Berkfield, a social justice training facilitator and cofounder of the Root Social Justice Center, has written this volume with five co-authors…. Each chapter starts with questions for reflection that can be used as starting points for further conversation with kids. The book teaches how to build seven social justice principles into discussion and action, then shows how to apply these principles to racial, economic, gender, and disability justice. Berkfield asserts that people gain personal power when their basic needs are met; then violence, addiction, or isolation can begin to abate.” — Julia M. Reffner. LIBRARY JOURNAL

“The Life of Fred: Edgewood” by Stanley F. Schmidt Ph. D. — “This is a child-directed course. The student reads the adventure story, does the math problems that occur as a natural part of the story, and checks their answers (the solutions are right there for the looking.) And learns to love math in the process! You will not get the detailed formula explanations that you get in a traditional math book. I am still amazed that kids can read the story and learn the concepts, but they do!” — Amazon.com

“Zillions of Practice Problems: Fractions” by Stanley F. Schmidt Ph. D. — “Practice problems for the first book in the Life of Fred Upper Elementary/Middle School Series. Need more practice with fractions? Zillions of Practice Problems Fractions has you covered” — Amazon.com

ITEMS

Orion StarBlast Telescope

PICTURE BOOK

“A Day with Yayah” by Nicola I. Campbell
“All the Way to the Top: How One Girl’s Fight for Americans with Disabilities Changed Everything” by Annette Bay Pimentl
“Bodies are Cool” by Tyler Feder
“Bright Star” by Yuyi Morales
“Change Sings: A Children’s Anthem” by Amanda Gorman
“Einstein: The Fantastic Journey of a Mouse through Space and Time” by Torben Kuhlmann
“How Many Seeds in a Pumpkin?” by Margaret McNamara
“Listen” by Gabi Snyder
“Little Witch Hazel: A Year in the Forest” by Phoebe Wahl
“Over and Under the Canyon” by Kate Messner
“Peace Train” by Cat Stevens
“The First Blade of Sweetgrass: A Native American Story” by Suzanne Greenlaw and Gabriel Frey
“The Memory Box: A Book About Grief” by Joanna Rowland
“The Rhythm of the Rain” by Grahame Baker-Smith
“The Tree in Me” by Corinna Luyken
They, She, He, Me: Free to Be!” by Maya and Matthew Smith-Gonzalez
“Tomatoes for Neela” by Padma Lakshmi
“Tough Guys (Have Feelings Too)” by Keith Negley

JUVENILE BIOGRAPHY

“Chance: Escape from Holocaust” by Uri Shulevitz — “Though touching on many dark and serious topics, this story is totally focused on the fears, triumphs, and sensibilities of a child. It is truly a portrait of an artist as a young man thrust into a maelstrom of a world gone mad and relying on chance to decide his fate.” ―The Horn Book, starred review

JUVENILE FICTION

“365 Days to Alaska” by Cathy Carr — “Carr’s heartfelt debut features classic middle-school problems, like dodging mean kids, as well as Rigel’s vivid feelings of displacement and deep love for nature.”  ― Booklist

“Ara Shah and the End of Time” by Roshani Chokshi — “In her middle-grade debut, Chokshi spins a fantastical narrative that seamlessly intertwines Hindu cosmology and folklore, feminism, and witty dialogue for an uproarious novel for young readers. Chokshi comes into her own in this novel, reminding readers of the power of language and of stories.”―Kirkus (starred review)

“Barefoot Dreams of Petra Luna” by Alda P. Dobbs — “Historical fiction that is as relevant as ever…A timeless and timely tale of one girl’s journey to save her family and discover herself.” ― Kirkus Reviews

Eugenia Lincoln and the Unexpected Package” by Kate DiCamillo — “As in the earlier books, believable (if eccentric) personalities, sophisticated vocabulary, and polished prose make this an inviting title for emerging chapter- book readers. Fans of this series and the earlier Mercy Watson books will be amazed by Eugenia’s partial redemption and delight that the results are merely temporary.” —Booklist

Finding Junie Kim” by Ellen Oh — “She seamlessly provides insight into Korean history and culture for the unintroduced and captures the human condition during wartime through frank portrayals of Junie’s modern-day struggles…Oh’s powerful novel sheds light on the devastating effect racism can have, and tells a history often overlooked.” — School Library Journal (starred review)

“Healer of the Water Monster” by Brian Young — “The deeply grounded and original perspective of this story brings readers into both the worlds of Navajo blessing songs, rain songs, and traditional healing and everyday family relationships. Hands readers a meaningful new take on family love.” — Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“Kaleidoscope” by Brian Selznick — “Selznick and Serlin take the easy reader format to new creative heights….The sharp pacing and charming humor also make it an excellent read-aloud choice….as funny as it is elegant. This will be enjoyed equally by youngsters and their grown-ups.” — School Library Journal, starred review

“King and the Dragonflies” by Kacen Callender — “Callender masterfully balances resonant themes of grief, love, family, friendship, racism, sexuality, and coming-of-age…deeply affecting, memorable.”-The Horn Book, starred review

“Let’s Mooove!” by Courtney Sheinmel — “Travel around the United States of America with twins Finn and Molly in this new chapter book series that highlights a different state in each book! … We must be dreaming! That’s what twins Finn and Molly Parker think when they discover a camper in their driveway–and it talks! When the RV transports them to a cattle ranch in Colorado, the twins know something magical has happened. Then the camper disappears, leaving Finn and Molly to wonder . . . how are we going to get home?..” — ONIX annotations

“Long Lost” by Jacqueline West — “In a spooky middle grade love letter to libraries and the mystery genre, West crafts a spellbinding exploration of sisterhood. . . . Alternating a contemporary third-person narrative with the found book’s parallel telling, West draws readers into a supernaturally tinged dual story, simultaneously offering an authentic portrait of sibling angst.” — Publishers Weekly

“Paradise on Fire” by Jewell Parker Rhodes — “Placing biracial boyhood and the struggles of colorism at its center, the novel challenges readers to pursue their own self-definition.”―Kirkus

“Rez Dogs” by Joseph Bruchac — “Hidden throughout this moving novel in verse, old stories are discovered like buried treasures.”—Kirkus, starred review

“Set Me Free” by Ann Clare LeZotte — “Full of adventure and twists, and LeZotte never shies away from addressing racism, ableism, or sexism…the book’s themes resonate today, as Mary fights for the rights of all people and offers hope to readers facing challenges. A gripping tale of historical fiction.” — Booklist

The Beatryce Prophecy” by Kate DiCamillo — “The incomparable Kate DiCamillo offers a lovely fable of a girl, a monk and a goat, a tale that is a testament of the power of love (as so many of her books are) and the power of the written word to change the world for the better.” —The Buffalo News

“The Ickabog” by J. K. Rowlings — “Once upon a time there was a tiny kingdom called Cornucopia, as rich in happiness as it was in gold, and famous for its food. From the delicate cream cheeses of Kurdsburg to the Hopes-of-Heaven pastries of Chouxville, each was so delicious that people wept with joy as they ate them. But even in this happy kingdom, a monster lurks. Legend tells of a fearsome creature living far to the north in the Marshlands… the Ickabog. Some say it breathes fire, spits poison, and roars through the mist as it carries off wayward sheep and children alike. Some say it’s just a myth… And when that myth takes on a life of its own, casting a shadow over the kingdom, two children – best friends Bert and Daisy – embark on a great adventure to untangle the truth and find out where the real monster lies, bringing hope and happiness to Cornucopia once more.” — Publisher Annotation:

“The Last Fallen Star” by Graci Kim — “From a compelling and endearing supporting cast to the rich and tantalizing Korean cuisine explored in its pages, this pays homage to traditional Korean magic and mythos while infusing it with a contemporary story line and characters readers will fall in love with in an instant. Riley’s unmistakable voice and her relatable search for and exploration of her identity will connect with readers at their cores, offering a truly promising start to a fantastical series.”―Booklist (starred review)

“The Storm Runner” by Jennifer Cervantes — “J. C. Cervantes is about to take you on a trip you will never forget, through the darkest, strangest, and funniest twists and turns of Maya myth. You will meet the scariest gods you can imagine, the creepiest denizens of the Underworld, and the most amazing and unlikely heroes who have to save our world from being ripped apart.”―Rick Riordan

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Draw a Comic!” by J. P. Coovert — “…With Maker Comics: Draw a Comic! you’ll learn to create and print your own comics books! Follow these simple steps to sketch out your story ideas and ink a comic page. Learn which art supplies are best for drawing comics—you can use a pen, a brush, or even a computer! With the help of photocopy machine, you can even self-publish your own comics and share them with your friends!” — Amazon.com

“History Smashers: The Titanic” by Kate Messner — “Critical, respectful, engaging: exemplary history for children.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Snapdragon” by Kat Leh — “Snapdragon invigorates a classic hero’s journey with magic and heart.”―The AV Club

“The Girl from the Sea” by Molly Knox Ostergag — “Fifteen-year-old Morgan has a secret: She can’t wait to escape the perfect little island where she lives. She’s desperate to finish high school and escape her sad divorced mom, her volatile little brother, and worst of all, her great group of friends…who don’t understand Morgan at all. Because really, Morgan’s biggest secret is that she has a lot of secrets, including the one about wanting to kiss another girl. Then one night, Morgan is saved from drowning by a mysterious girl named Keltie. The two become friends and suddenly life on the island doesn’t seem so stifling anymore.But Keltie has some secrets of her own. And as the girls start to fall in love, everything they’re each trying to hide will find its way to the surface…whether Morgan is ready or not.” — Publisher Annotation:

“The Golden Compass: The Graphic Novel” by Stephanie Melchior-Durand — “Now, in this graphic novel adaptation of The Golden Compass, the world of His Dark Materials is brought to visual life. The stunning full-color art will offer both new and returning readers a chance to experience the story of Lyra, an ordinary girl with an extraordinary role to play in the fates of multiple worlds, in an entirely fresh way. This volume collects the full journey of Lyra to the far north, her rescue of the kidnapped children at Bolvangar, her escape via hot-air balloon, and her crucial role in Lord Asriel s ambitions to build a bridge to another world.” — ONIX Annotations

“The Way of the Hive: A Honey Bee’s Story” by Jay Hosler — “Graphic novel fans, lovers of nonfiction, budding ecologists, and readers looking for their next great obsession will be buzzing around this title for years to come.” — Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“This Place: 150 Years Retold” by various authors — “Ambitious in scope and strong in execution, this collection succeeds in prompting readers to remember (or learn) Indigenous history “Elisa Gall The Horn Book Magazine

“Tom’s Midnight Garden: A Graphic Adaption of the Philippa Pearce Classic” by Edith — ““[Edith’s] fine-lined figures, sketchy shading, stylish shapes, and muted palette of natural tones balance a modern look with the old-fashioned story. Perfect for fans of time-travel adventures or fantasies with a  smidgen of historical fiction.” — Booklist

“Treasure in the Lake” by Jason Pamment — “This story is astonishing enough to leave people speechless.” — Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

JUVENILE NON-FICTION

“Design like Nature: Biomimicry for a Healthy Planet” by Megan Clendenan —
“The approachable text, supported by lots of captioned photos, spotlights some of nature’s more remarkable innovations and some engineering feats inspired by nature.” ― The Horn Book

“Mad for Ads: How Advertising Gets (and Stays) in Our Heads” by Erica Fyvie — “This upbeat, up-to-date look at advertising helps young readers understand just how insidious marketing can be.” ―Booklist

“Master of Disguise; Camouflaging Creatures & Magnificent Mimics” by Marc Martin — “Martin highlights the lives and disguises of one dozen animals hailing from habitats from every continent but Antarctica, with camouflaged-animal searches. Captivating watercolor art immediately draws you in. . . Both art and text enhance scientific accuracy with beauty and playfulness—a rare feat. Sturdy pages, too. Do not hide this book!”
Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“Our World Out of Balance: Understanding Climate Change and What We Can Do” by Andrea Minogloi — “A great starting place to understand climate change and its effects.” Booklist

“Out of the Blue: How Animals Evolved from Prehistoric Seas” by Elizabeth Shreeve — “This short book guides the reader from the beginnings of life eons ago through to the present day, beginning with an Earth devoid of life and following water-dwelling, single-celled creatures that develop and change as they move “out of the blue” and onto land. The text explains the adaptations that were necessary for animals to live out of the water, as well as how some animals survived (and how others didn’t) during the several extinction events that Earth has suffered.” —School Library Connection

Pearl Harbor” by Kate Messner — “Kate Messner serves up fun, fast history for kids who want the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth. Absolutely smashing!” —Candace Fleming, award-wining author

Pie for Breakfast: A Baking Book for Children” by Cynthia Cliff — “A beautifully illustrated baking book for children featuring recipes for delicious treats along with a powerful message about family, diversity, and helping others.” — Random House, Inc.

“Rescuing Titanic” by Flora Delargy — “This gorgeously illustrated tale of heroes and hope amid one of the most well-known marine tragedies of all time is a must buy for collections serving curious readers of all ages fascinated by the Titanic.”  ―Emily Beasley, Omaha Public Sch., NE, School Library Journal, starred review

Stamped (for Kids): Racism: Antiracism and You” by Sonja Cherry-Paul — “Readers who want to truly understand how deeply embedded racism is in the very fabric of the U.S., its history, and its systems will come away educated and enlightened. Worthy of inclusion in every home and in curricula and libraries everywhere. Impressive and much needed.”―Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“The American Revolution” by Keat Messner — “Critical, respectful, engaging: exemplary history for children.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“The Guide to Woodworking with Kids: Craft Projects to Develop the Lifelong Skills of Young Makers” by Doug Stowe –“… This comprehensive guide offers step by step instruction for teachers, parents and grandparents to offer safe woodworking opportunities to their students and kiddos as a way of developing a wide range of valuable life-skills. … The Guide to Woodworking with Kids is more than a woodworking book, it’s gives parents, grandparents and teachers the confidence, encouragement, and the insight needed to safely engage children in life-enhancing creative arts.” — ONIX annotations

The People Remember” by Ibi Aanu Zoboi — “This immaculately illustrated picture book walks through a vast swath of history… Zoboi’s poetic retrospective breathes life into Black history narratives and reverently celebrates Black lives.” — Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

YOUNG ADULT FICTION

“Call Me Athena: Girl from Detroit” by Colby Cedar Smith — “This story of an immigrant girl growing up in Detroit in the 1930s hits every mark. Woven into the story are her parents’ histories and all the love and loss the family has faced. It will tug your heartstrings.” — (American Booksellers Association)

“Defy the Night” by Brigid Kemmerer — “The slow-burn romance-between an idealist with straightforward moral beliefs and a pragmatist trapped by duty-will keep the pages turning, as will the scheming of the king’s consuls and the rebellion brewing in the background . . . . The personal and the political intertwine in this engaging series opener.” ―Kirkus Reviews

Lobizona” by Romina Garber — “In a timely work of magical realism featuring references to Borges and Garcia Márquez, Garber tackles issues of nationalism, identity, and belonging…This layered novel blends languages and cultures to create a narrative that celebrates perseverance.” – PUBLISHERS WEEKLY (Starred Review)

Me (Moth)” by Amber McBride — “This searing debut novel-in-verse is told from the perspective of Moth, a Black teen whose life changed forever the day a car crash killed her family. … Each free verse poem is tightly composed, leading into the next for a poignant and richly layered narrative. The story builds softly and subtly to a perfect, bittersweet ending. Fans of Jacqueline Woodson won’t be able to put this one down.”―School Library Journal, starred review

On the Come Up” by Angie Thomas — “With sharp, even piercing, characterization, this indelible and intricate story of a young girl who is brilliant and sometimes reckless, who is deeply loved and rightfully angry at a world that reduces her to less than her big dreams call her to be, provides many pathways for readers.” — Horn Book (starred review)

The Dead and the Dark” by Courtney Gould — “Gould’s supernaturally spooky debut is filled with all manner of creepy inventiveness…an intriguing read.” – Publishers Weekly

“The Last Legacy” by Adrienne Young — “In this sumptuously rendered historical novel, Young deftly explores concepts of family, loyalty, and growing into one’s destiny.” – Publishers Weekly

“The Dead and the Dark” by Courtney Gould — “Gould’s supernaturally spooky debut is filled with all manner of creepy inventiveness…an intriguing read.” – Publishers Weekly by Charlotte Nicole Davis

“The Wild Ones: A Broken Anthem for a Girl Nation” by Nafiza Azad — “A powerful feminist account of sisterhood, the longevity of pain, and the reclamation of power.” ― Kirkus Reviews

There Will Come a Darkness” by Katy Rose Pool — “[S]et apart by its immersive worldbuilding and compelling narrators.” ―Shelf Awareness, STARRED review

YOUNG ADULT NON-FICTION

I Will Always Write Back: How One Letter Changed Two Lives” by Caitlin Alifirenka — “The remarkable tenacity of these two souls pulled like magnets across the world by their opposite polarities – one committed to helping, the other to surviving – is deeply affecting…It’s quite a little miracle of unexpected genuineness.”―New York Times Book Review

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

A Girl Called Echo” by Katherena Vermette — “Henderson’s realistic art and perfect pacing, particularly in the pages of wordless panels depicting Echo’s daily routine, highlight her silent nature and hint at the source of her unspoken sadness. Solitary teens are likely to strongly identify with Echo and look forward to more of her adventures. ― Booklist

“Nubia: The Real One” by L. L. McKinney — “… with endearing and expressive art by Robyn Smith, comes a vital story for today about equality, identity, and kicking it with your squad.” — Amazon.com

Categories
Highlighted New Arrivals

The Hidden Kingdom by Tui Sutherland

“The five dragonets of the prophecy are hoping to hide in safety in the RainWing kingdom, and Glory is hoping to learn more about her own identity, but when tribe members start disappearing and the old queen does nothing, it is up to Glory and her friendsto uncover the lurking evil.” – Baker & Taylor

Categories
Highlighted New Arrivals

Dog Man: Grime and Punishment

“Dog Man: Grime and Punishment” by Dav Pilkey — “High-intensity, heartwarming, and, above all, hysterically funny.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review