Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – JANUARY 2023

ADULT FICTION

“Great Circle” by Maggie Shipstead — “Transcendent . . . A rolling, roiling epic . . . Through the interwoven stories of impetuous flyer Marian Graves and flavor-of-the-month actress Hadley Baxter, Shipstead ponders the motivating forces behind acts of daring defiance, self-fulfillment and self-destruction. An ambitious, soaring saga—[Shipstead] takes her characters to dizzying heights, drawing readers into lives of courage and mystery.”
Booklist

“In Love’s Time” by Kate Breslin — “MI6 agent Marcus Weatherford lives by the principle of duty before love, but with WWI nearing its end, he hopes to finally fulfill his promise of forever to Clare Danner …. Set in 1918 in England, In Love’s Time features the tender rediscovery of love amidst the high-stakes danger of wartime espionage tied to the Russian Empire in WWI. Clare embodies emotional vulnerability, resilience, and faith in the face of the unknown. Readers will be thrilled by the race-against-the-clock conclusion and the palpable passion between Marcus and Clare that is simmering below the surface.” — Kate Campos, AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2022.

“The Lies I Tell” by Julie Clark — “Intriguing…Clark skillfully fleshes out the strong, multifaceted characters. The story nicely mixes brisk plot points with slow burning reveals as it builds to a satisfying conclusion. Clark doesn’t disappoint.” ― Publishers Weekly

“The Mother-in-Law” by Sally Hepworth — “A deliciously entertaining novel about one woman’s complicated relationship with her mother-in-law that ends in death. This one is perfect for fans of Big Little Lies.” ―Good Morning America

ADULT MYSTERY

“Bloody Soil” by S. Lee Manning — “…the action rarely lets up…riveting, energetic…with lead characters worth rooting for.”-Kirkus Reviews

“The Department of Rare Books and Special Collections” by Eva Jurczyk — “Who doesn’t love a mystery involving rare books and bad librarians? This clever, deftly written story has all that and more. A great pleasure from beginning to end.” ― Karen Joy Fowler, New York Times bestselling author

“The Rising Tide” by Ann Cleeves — “A friend of mine once joked that the work of Ann Cleeves is the closest the crime-fiction genre comes to evoking ASMR ― the euphoric, pleasant, spine-tingling sensation that’s all the rage on YouTube. The books never get too dark, never venture too far into dangerous territory, but aren’t outright cozy, either…. This is the work of a pro ― a diverting, solidly crafted mystery that’s guaranteed to entertain.”―New York Times Book Review

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“The Revolutionary Samuel Adams” by Stacy Schiff — “This enthralling biography is a persuasive exercise in rehabilitation. Through stylish prose and a close reading of Adams’s career as a canny propagandist, Schiff suggests that he may have done more than any other founder to prime colonists for armed rebellion and deserves to be better known.”―Gregory Cowles, New York Times, Editors’ Choice

ADULT NON-FICTION

“American Midnight: The Great War, a Violent Peace, and Democracy’s Forgotten Crisis” by Adam Hochschild — “A sweeping look at the years between World War I and the Roaring Twenties, when conscientious objectors to the war were maltreated and conflicts over race and labor were at a high pitch. Hochschild draws direct lines between events of that time and the unrest of today.” — New York Times, 15 Works of Nonfiction to Read This Fall

“Breathe In Breathe Out: Restore Your Health, Reset Your Mind and Find Happiness Through Breathwork” by Stuart Sandeman — “[The exercises] offer a variety of ways to try breathwork… [Breathe In, Breathe Out] gets the job done.” –Publishers Weekly

Solar Power for Beginners, 2 in 1 bundle: A DIY Guide to Solar Energy, Designing and Installing Grid-tied, Hybrid, and Off-grid Solar Systems for Your House, RV, Camper Van, Boar, Cabin and Tiny Home” by DIY Source — “Are you willing to cut your electricity bill in half by adding a solar setup to your house?
If yes, then this 2 in 1 solar power DIY bundle book is written for you!” — Amazon

“The Myth of Normal: Trauma, Illness & Healing in a Toxic Culture” by Gabor Mate — “In The Myth of Normal, Gabor Maté takes us on an epic journey of discovery about how our emotional well-being, and our social connectivity (in short: how we live), is intimately intertwined with health, disease and addictions. Chronic mental and physical illnesses may not be separate and distinct diseases, but intricate, multilayered processes that reflect (mal)adaptations to the cultural context that we live in, and the values we live by. This riveting and beautifully written tale has profound implications for all of our lives, including the practice of medicine and mental health.”–Bessel A. van der Kolk MD, President, Trauma Research Foundation, Professor of psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine, #1 New York Times Bestseller: The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind and Body in the Healing of Trauma

“The Progress Illusion: Reclaiming our Future from the Fairytale of Economics” by Jon D. Erickson — “Erickson’s powerful new book shows how flawed economic thinking has shaped not only our economy but also our society and politics. The story is both deeply disturbing and hopeful, as Erickson describes an emerging brand of economics that shifts focus from GDP to well-being. Highly recommended.” — James Gustave Speth, former Dean, Yale School of the Environment; author of “America the Possible: Manifesto for a New Economy”

“The Woodchip Handbook: A Complete Guide for Farmers, Gardeners and Landscapers” by Ben Raskin — “Ben Raskin’s wide-ranging work in varied locations makes The Woodchip Handbook a really useful overview of the possibilities afforded by woodchip. It’s good for soil and good for plants, once you understand how it can work best for you, as he explains in this book.”―Charles Dowding, author of Charles Dowding’s No Dig Gardening

“Why Fish Don’t Exist: A Story of Loss, Love, and the Hidden Order of Life” by Lulu Miller — “Riveting. Surprising. Shocking, even! Why Fish Don’t Exist begins with a mesmerizing account of the life of distinguished biologist David Starr Jordan—and then, quite unexpectedly, turns into so much more. Narrated in Lulu Miller’s intimate, quirky voice, this is a story of science and struggle, of heartbreak and chaos. This book will capture your heart, seize your imagination, smash your preconceptions, and rock your world.” — Sy Montgomery, New York Times bestselling author of The Soul of an Octopus

PARENTING

“Sewing Quiet Books for Children: Easy to Make, Easy to Customize: 18 Step-by-Step Page Projects with Patterns” by Lily Zunic — “…Zunic shows how to construct two different types of cloth books–one for babies and one for toddlers–that will spark a sense of textile learning that can’t be matched by technology. Information on materials and basic techniques prefaces the project instructions, which feature how-to information on fabrics, zipper sewing, and pattern transfer as well as hands-on, step-by-step instructions for fabricating either a sewn-spine or ring-bound activity book. … Includes 14 full-size templates.” — Barbara Jacobs. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2022.

“The Sears Baby Book: Everything You Need to Know about Your Baby from Birth to Age Two” by William Sears, M.D. — “The million-copy bestseller by “the man who remade motherhood” (TIME) has now been revised, expanded, and bought thoroughly up-to-date — with the latest information on prenatal vitamins, breastfeeding practices, daycare, midwifery, hospital births, preventing and overcoming postpartum depression, and infant development.” — Amazon.com

BOARD BOOK

“Poppy’s Feelings”
“Poppy’s Shape Search”
“Where’s Poppy”

PICTURE BOOK

“After the Snowfall” by Rich Lo
“I am Human: A Book of Empathy” by Susan Verde

JUVENILE BIOGRAPHY

“Sanctuary: Kip Tiernan and Rosie’s Place, the Nation’s First Shelter” by Christine McDonnell — “Author Christine McDonnell, who has taught English to immigrants at Rosie’s Place, adeptly conveys the narrative arc of Tiernan’s life. . . . Victoria Tentler-Krylov’s atmospheric illustrations draw readers into Tiernan’s surroundings with immediacy and emotion. . . . This thoughtful book conveys a powerful, important message: ‘When you listen to others, you show respect; you learn who they are and what they need.'” —BookPage (starred review)

JUVENILE FICTION

“The Door of No Return” by Kwame Alexander — “Interweaving moments of joyful exuberance and heartbreaking sadness via sensate lines by turns sweet and stinging, Alexander’s sweeping novel conjures a captivating, resonant world of African tradition, life, and ancestral wisdom.”―Publishers Weekly, starred review

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Claire and the Dragons” by Wander Atunes — “Claire and the Dragons is a female-centric fantasy adventure comic book series set in a Dark Ages-like world written and illustrated by Brazilian creator Wander Antunes and published by Scout Comics’ all-ages imprint Scoot. — Amazon.com

“Extraordinary” A Story of an Ordinary Princess” by Cassie Anderson — “While her sisters were blessed at birth with exceptional skills, Princess Basil’s “gift” is to be ordinary. But can a princess be ordinary? Inspired by M. M. Kaye’s beloved novel!” — Amazon.com

“Fish Girl” by David Wiesner and Donna Jo Napoli — “The triple Caldecott winner David Wiesner brings his rich visual imagination and trademark artistry to the graphic novel format in a unique coming-of-age tale that begins underwater. A young mermaid, called Fish Girl, in a boardwalk aquarium has a chance encounter with an ordinary girl. Their growing friendship inspires Fish Girl’s longing for freedom, independence, and a life beyond the aquarium tank. Sparkling with humor and brilliantly visualized, Fish Girl’s story will resonate with every young person facing the challenges and rewards of growing up.” — Onix Annotations,

YOUNG ADULT FICTION

“Big Boned” by Jo Watson — “Big Boned is an optimistic novel whose warm cast subverts convention, and whose heroine learns to take risks.” ―Foreword

“I was Born for This” by Alice Oseman — “A funny, wise, and heartbreakingly true coming of age novel. I Was Born for This is a stunning reflection of modern teenage life, and the power of believing in something — especially yourself.” — Amazon.com

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

“Unfamiliar” by Haley Newsome — “Based on the wildly popular webcomic from Tapas, Unfamiliar is an endearing and whimsical story full of magical mayhem, offbeat outsiders, and the power of friendships and found family. …” Onix Annotations

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – DECEMBER 2022

ADULT FICTION

“After Lives” by Abdulrazak Gurnah — “An appreciation for quiet, ordinary forms of heroism runs throughout. . . . One can take away lessons and meanings from this novel, yet such things are perhaps less significant than the sheer seeming realness of the characters, whose presences Mr. Gurnah has faithfully crafted into existence, with all of their dreaming, their sorrow and their resilience.”—Wall Street Journal

“Four Treasures of the Sky” by Jenny Tinghui Zhang — “Fierce and moving…Zhang delves into the history of violence and prejudice against Chinese people in the U.S. with her debut, a lyrical and sweeping Bildungsroman…The author skillfully delineates the many characters and offers fascinating details on Chinese calligraphy and literature, along with an unsparing view of white supremacy.” ―Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“No Land to Light” by Yara Zgheib — “Zgheib’s prose is sensory, piquant with the scent of spices even as it captures the sorrow of living in exile while war destroys your homeland. But the novel’s real power is in humanizing the cruelties and injustices visited on migrants caught up in the travel ban.” ― Library Journal (starred)

“The Book of Goose” by Yiyun Li — “This is a novel of deceptions and cruelty . . . But within this somber mood is something brilliant. With characteristic poise, Li depicts the intricacies of ordinary lives: childhood friendship, growing up, and existences as slow as the passively ‘floating’ geese Agnès watches.” ―Francesca Peacock, The Spectator

“The Boys from Biloxi” by John Grisham — “John Grisham returns to Mississippi with the riveting story of two sons of immigrant families who grow up as friends, but ultimately find themselves on opposite sides of the law. Grisham’s trademark twists and turns will keep you tearing through the pages until the stunning conclusion.” — Amazon.com

“The Dead Romantics” by Ashley Poston — “Romance, chaos, and complications are central components in Poston’s refreshingly fun, spirited rom-coms, and The Dead Romantics is no exception. The beauty and charm of Poston’s storytelling continues to make miraculous happy endings out of the messes in which ordinary people often find themselves entangled.” —Shelf Awareness

“The Dreamtime” by Mstyslav Chernov — “Chernov is a singular voice writing about Ukraine today, and The Dreamtime is essential reading to understanding the ways that war has infiltrated people’s everyday lives far beyond the front lines. It is an ambitious novel that draws together diverse perspectives to reflect the raw emotions of life and death.” ― Emily Channell-Justice, Director, Temerty Contemporary Ukraine Program

“The Flight Portfolio” by Julie Orringer — “Magnificent . . . a deeply researched, almost unbearably tense, bruised-knuckle hybrid. Part real history and part love story, it’s also a deeply moral work, asking tough questions about what matters most to us personally—and to the world.” — The Boston Globe

“The Latecomer” by Jean Hanff Korelitz — “If this novel is funny, it is also cutting, a nearly forensic study of family conflict. Husband and wife are at odds; children pull away not only from their parents but from one another. Nimbly, Korelitz juggles the stories of each parent and child, weaving a tapestry of secrets, antipathies and private quests. … It’s testament to Korelitz’s achievement that her novel leaves us wanting more.” ―New York Times Book Review

“The Light Pirate” by Lily Brooks-Dalton — “A formidable young woman’s coming-of-age . . . Brooks-Dalton creates an all-too-believable picture of nature reclaiming Florida from its human inhabitants, and her complex and engaging characters make climate disaster a vividly individual experience rather than an abstract subject of debate.”―Kirkus, Starred Review

“The Rabbit Hutch” by Tess Gunty — “Ambitious . . . Despite offering a dissection of contemporary urban blight, the novel doesn’t let social concerns crowd out the individuality of its characters, and Blandine’s off-kilter brilliance is central to the achievement.”—The New Yorker

“The Reindeer Hunters” by Lars Mytting — “…Pastor Kai Schweigaard is haunted by the past; he was responsible for the loss of the village’s ancient stave church and its sister bells cast in the 1600s in memory of two famous weavers, conjoined twin sisters. These twins created the Hekne Weave, a tapestry depicting Skrapanatta, the end of days. While Schweigaard searches for the Weave and what it might portend, Jehans, a Hekne and son of Schweigaard’s lost love, struggles to make his way. Butangen lingers in the grip of feudalism, but change is inevitable. This novel explores themes of modernization and identity on various levels: national (Norway’s separation from its union with Sweden), familial, and religious (Norse myth and Christianity). The world Mytting creates is immersive, including descriptions of reindeer hunting and the feel of a scythe on a whetstone. The result is a fascinating story with centuries-old echoes, their muted peal resonating like the separated sister bells.” — Bethany Latham. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2022. — Booklist

“The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida” by Shehan Karunatilaka — “Comic, macabre, angry and thumpingly alive… [Maali’s voice] has bite, brilliance, and sparkle… Still, the furious comedy in Mr. Karunatilaka’s novel never courts despair.”― Economist

“The Whalebone Theatre” by Joanna Quinn — “What’s remarkable, especially for a first novel, is Quinn’s deft way of depicting this lost world—whether a subsiding seaside aristocracy or a training school for British agents or a Parisian theater in wartime . . . Her vision is so fine and fully realized that it’s hard to imagine her doing anything else—and hard to have to wait to see what that might be.” —Washington Post

ADULT MYSTERY

“A World of Curiosities” by Louise Penny — “Penny delves into the nature of evil, sensitively exploring the impact of the dreadful events she describes while bringing a warmth and humanity to her disparate cast of characters that, unusually for a crime novel, leaves you feeling better about the world once you’ve finished.” ―The Guardian

“All Good People Here” by Ashley Flowers — “All Good People Here has enough twists and layers for three novels. Ashley Flowers has taken a premise familiar to true-crime fans and created a story that’s compelling and psychologically rich, with an ending that’s as unnerving as it is satisfying.” —Lou Berney

“City on Fire” by Don Winslow — “A masterwork of mob fiction. . . City on Fire does for Rhode Island what David Chase’s The Sopranos did for New Jersey. . . It’s Winslow’s ways with character, as well as his fluid narrative and highly visual scene-setting, that suggest this novel, the first in a planned trilogy, could well end up in the American-mob canon along with the works of Puzo, Scorsese and Chase.” — Washington Post

“Going Rogue” by Janet Evanovich — “Full of surprises, thrills, and humor, Going Rogue reveals a new side of Stephanie Plum, and shows Janet Evanovich at her scorching, riotous best.” — Amazon.com

“The Bangalore Detectives” by Harini Nagendra — “The first in an effervescent new mystery series by the ecology professor Harini Nagendra, The Bangalore Detectives Club turns the clock back a century. This is a treat for historical mystery lovers looking for a new series to savor (or devour).” — Sarah Weinman ― The New York Times Book Review

“The Bullets that Missed” by Richard Osman — “The Bullet That Missed hits on every front. Its quandaries stymie, its solutions thrill, its banter is worth reciting and its characters exemplify an admirable camaraderie. One can only hope that the Thursday Murder Club’s next outing appears before long.” —Wall Street Journal

The Secrets of Winter” by Nicola Upson — “A truly brilliant twist…yet, it is the quality of writing that makes this pulpy novel not just for Christmas but for life.” —The UK Times

“The Twist of a Knife” by Anthony Horowitz — “In New York Times bestselling author Anthony Horowitz’s ingenious fourth literary whodunit following The Word is Murder, The Sentence is Death, and A Line to Kill, Horowitz becomes the prime suspect in a murder investigation—and only one man can prove his innocence: his newly estranged partner in solving crime, Detective Hawthorne.” — Publisher Annotation

“The Unkempt Woman” by Allison Montclair — “Exemplary… Montclair’s capable, funny, and fully developed leads set a gold standard.” –-Publishers Weekly (starred review)

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“Alzheimer’s Canyon: One Couple’s Reflections on Living with Dementia” by Jane Dwinell & Sky Yardley — “… Jane Dwinell and Sky Yardley take us on a journey with them into the uncharted world of Alzheimer’s Disease. They bravely navigate the depths of Alzheimer’s Canyon, shining a light in a disorienting landscape. Their unflinching honesty about their lived experience serves as an emotional road map for anyone facing an unexpected challenge. Out of her grief, Dwinell offers this gift, and hope.” –David Goodman, bestselling author and host of The Vermont Conversation

“And There Was Light: Abraham Lincoln and the American Struggle” by John Meacham — “Biography at its best, the great historian Barbara Tuchman wrote, paints an intimate portrait of an individual which simultaneously provides a sweeping view of history. With this deep, compelling work, Jon Meacham has achieved this gold standard. Written with wisdom and grace, his story of Lincoln’s complex moral journey to Emancipation mirrors America’s long quest to live up to its founding ideals.” —Doris Kearns Goodwin

“Sigh, Gone: A Misfit’s Memoir of Great Books, Punk Rock and the Fight to Fit In” by Phuc Tran — “Funny, poignant, and unsparing, Tran’s sharp, sensitive, punk-inflected memoir presents one immigrant’s quest for self-acceptance through the lens of American and European literary classics. A highly witty and topical read―an impressive debut.” ―Kirkus (starred review)

“The Light We Carry: Overcoming in Uncertain Times” by Michelle Obama —
“Obama’s road map for uncertain times resonates in ways that other self-help books do not. . . . Through her stories, experiences and thoughts, we’re finding the light with her.” —The New York Times  

ADULT NON-FICTION

“15-Minute Ink Landscapes: Simple, Striking, Soothing Lineart of Forests, Mountains, Beaches and More” by Rosa Hoehn — “15-Minute Ink Landscapes is a great guide for beginners looking to get comfortable with drawing different nature-based designs. Rosa offers solid tips and guided examples along the way. I highly recommend this book!” ― Jason Yates, artist and founder of @Jy.Ink

“Best Road Trips Ontario & Quebec: Escapes on the Open Road” by Shawn Duthie & others — “The Perfect Choice: Lonely Planet’s Ontario & Quebec’s Best Road Trips is perfect for exploring Ontario and Quebec via the road and discovering sights that are more accessible by car.” — Amazon.com

“Dorie’s Cookies” by Dorie Greenspan — “Dorie has written the perfect book to satisfy the Cookie Monster in all of us. These recipes are both classic and inventive and totally delicious.” — Ina Garten, Barefoot Contessa cookbooks and television

“From Scratch: Adventures in Harvesting, Hunting, Fishing and Foraging on a Fragile Planet” by David & Jon Moscow — “This is delicious, adventuresome entertainment for the mind, soul, heart, and stomach. A dynamic, ruminative journal for food lovers and armchair globe-trotters.” — Kirkus Review

“Psychology of Positive Aging” by Ellen Heuven — “While it is undeniable that certain physical functions start to decline from a certain age, both the life stories of the interviewees and scientific literature show that psychological functioning can become more robust into old age. The women in this book are inspiring role models who show how you can grow, live a fulfilling live and achieve goals, not so much DESPITE but WITH or THANKS to aging.” — Amazon.com

“Turning Bowls with Richard Raffan” by Richard Raffan — “The worlds pre-eminent woodturning teacher provides everything you need to know to turn bowls. Richard Raffan draws upon his 30 plus years of experience to lead you through the key elements — from planning to completion.” — Amazon.com

PICTURE BOOK

“You Are Never Alone” by Elin Kelsey

JUVENILE FICTION

“Mapmaker” by Lisa Moore Ramee — “This is an exciting adventure full of friendship and heart with a likable nerdy-Black-kid protagonist…. Readers will enjoy the well-drawn characters as well as the fantastical landscapes and imaginative creatures in Walt’s magical world.” — Horn Book Magazine

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Bobo and Pup-Pup: Let’s Make Cake” by Vikram Madan — “This hilarious and relatable graphic chapter book will have kids ages 5-8 laughing out loud while gaining confidence in reading.” — Amazon.com

“Bobo and Pup-Pup: The Funny Book” by Vikram Madan — “A super funny book has Pup-Pup literally laughing out loud!! Bobo wants to read it so he can laugh too, but he must wait till Pup-Pup is finished. But the more Pup-Pup laughs, the harder it is to wait! All kids know that waiting is not easy!! What happens when Bobo’s patience runs out and he takes matters into his own hands?” — Amazon.com

“Bobo and Pup-Pup: We Love Bubbles” by Vikram Madan — “Grab some bubble mix and join Pup-Pup and Bobo for a good read.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Bunnicula” by James Howe — “Before it’s too late, Harold the dog and Chester the cat must find out the truth about the newest pet in the Monroe household — a suspicious-looking bunny with unusual habits… and fangs!” — GoodReads

“Cat Kid: Comic Club Collaborations” by Dav Pilkey — “Excitement and imagination run wild as Naomi, Melvin, Poppy, Gilbert, Curly, and their siblings get back to making comics with originality and laughter. But wait — have they cleaned their rooms yet?!” — Amazon.com

“Cat Kid: Comic Club on Purpose” by Dav Pilkey — “…. Here exploring the concept of purpose, Pilkey lets characters and readers ponder its complexity–with butt jokes keeping the tone light. While its theme is not as clearly developed as the previous volume’s, this episode nevertheless presents the series’ now-trademark winning mix of sibling hijinks and club members’ comics, rendered in a variety of styles.” — Kirkus Media LLC

“Cat’s Cradle: The Golden Twine” by Jo Rioux — “At times vividly hair-raising, the book never overwhelms the reader, making it a worthy entry in the too-small category of scary fun for middle grade readers… Thanks to Rioux’s crackerjack pace and dramatic panel composition, The Golden Twine is hard to put down.”―New York Times

“Crush” by Svetlana Chmakova — “Jorge seems to have it all together. He’s big enough that nobody really messes with him, but he’s also a genuinely sweet guy with a solid, reliable group of friends. The only time he ever really feels off his game is when he crosses paths with a certain girl… But when the group dynamic among the boys starts to shift, will Jorge be able to balance what his friends expect of him versus what he actually wants?” — Amazon.com

“Deep into the Amazon Jungle” by James O. Fraioli — “Vibrant and dramatic illustrations accompany this riverside adventure that introduces young readers to the diverse populations that reside in the Amazon. Kids will also learn about the consequences of deforestation for our entire planet—as well as the numerous ways that every person can do their share to preserve our forests, reduce waste, and help the environment.” — Amazon.com

“Enemies” by Svetlana Chmakova — “Felicity’s sure she’s going to do something big. Exactly what is still a mystery, but she’ll figure it out. Her sister, Letty, teases Felicity that she never finishes stuff, but that’s just because Letty is so perfect. Still, life is good with plenty of friends—drawing with the art club and playing games with her buddies keep her busy. But when she decides to join a contest to show Letty that she can get things done, Felicity begins to wonder if friends becoming enemies is easier than she thought. Are they really enemies, though…? What does it even mean to be enemies? And…who is it that she needs the most on her side…?” — Amazon.com

“Freestyle” by Gale Galligan — “A visually kinetic, emotionally complex story of finding a sense of self while navigating relationships and expectations. Fun and full of heart.” — School Library Journal, starred review

“Frizzy” by Claribel A. Ortega — “In the creators’ graphic novel debut, themes of anti-Blackness, colorism, and self-acceptance are explored with ­nuance and honesty. The subject of internalized racism is discussed in a way that will resonate with kids and families grappling with it for the first time.” ―School Library Journal, starred review

“Great White Shark Adventure” by James O. Fraioli — “This series opener will appeal most to young shark and science enthusiasts.” ― Booklist

“Green Lantern: Alliance” By Minh Le — “Tai Pham struggles with balancing school, his work in the family business, his friendships, and his new Green Lantern responsibilities. But Kid Flash arrives on the scene to become the super-hero partner Tai just might need.” — Amazon.com

“Hawai’i Sea Turtle Rescue” by James O. Fraioli — “Dive deep into this colorful and informative graphic novel adventure that brings readers up close and personal with the sea creatures of the vast and beautiful Pacific Ocean. Along the way, kids will also see how pollution and climate change can impact entire underwater ecosystems and find actionable steps that they can take to reduce waste and protect these precious reefs.” — Amazon.com

“I Survived the Nazi Invasion, 1944” by Lauren Tarshis — “… Lauren Tarshis’s New York Times bestselling I Survived series takes on vivid new life in this explosive graphic novel edition. Includes nonfiction back matter with historical photos and facts about World War II and the Holocaust.” — Amazon.com

“Investigators: Heist and Seek” by John Patrick Green — “Mango and Brash go undercover and under canvas as internationally renowned painters to expose a crook who has truly mastered the art of CRIME! Can they recover the missing masterpieces and save the city art museum’s fundraising gala before it’s too late…and they run out of appetizers? Find out in this latest pièce de résistance of action-packed illustrated fun.” — Amazon.com

“Invisible” by Christina Diaz Gonzalez & Gabriela Epstein — “Invisible celebrates individuality and community while transcending language barriers.” – Bookpage, starred review

“Journey Under the Arctic” by James O. Fraioli — “Join the team on this deep-sea expedition, and learn how the changing climate affects the ocean and its inhabitants, and discover what you can do to help save the planet!” — Amazon.com

“Leon the Extraordinary” by Jamar Nicholas — “In the city where Leon lives, superheroes — and supervillains — are commonplace. So how does an ordinary kid like Leon, who has no superpowers himself, become the superhero he wants to be? When all his classmates suddenly become obsessed with a new phone app that turns them into zombies, Leon gets his chance to prove that using his brain and following his heart can save the day.” — Amazon.com

“Miles Morales: Stranger Tides” by Justin A. Reynolds — “Miles Morales has just about gotten used to this being Spider-Man thing. Keeping Brooklyn safe, taking down bad guys, and finishing his homework―he’s got this! But when Spider-Man is invited to a launch for a brand-new video game, things go sideways fast. Anyone who plays the game is frozen, and it’s all because of a villain named the Stranger. He’s judged humanity and found it lacking, and his idea of justice is extreme.” — Amazon.com

“My Aunt is a Monster” by Reimena Yee —  “Safia is an irresistible lead, and her innate sense of wonder and longing for adventure… is heartwarming to the very last page.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Nat Enough” by Maria Scrivan — “What elevates Maria Scrivan’s graphic novel is the refreshing honesty with which it approaches its subject matter. The tone is instructive but not preachy, as Natalie develops her talents as a cartoonist and discovers her individuality, which brings her not only the acceptance of others but, more importantly, self-acceptance.” — Financial Times

“Nico Bravo and the Cellar Dwellers” by Mike Cavallaro — “Orcus mistakenly unleashes a dangerous ‘Misery’ from the God of Misfortune’s pouch, threatening everyone in the Supply Shop, but also discovers the missing link between Nico, the Unicorn Wars, and Reality itself! What will happen to Nico and his friends when all their troubles converge in a desperate battle for the fate of the Universe?” — Amazon.com

“Nico Bravo and the Hound of Hades” by Mike Cavallaro — “But Nico’s world is about to be turned upside down, and it’s all thanks his latest customer: Eowulf, the pint-size descendant of the monster slayer Beowulf. Determined to carry on the family business, this would-be warrior plans to slay Cerberus, the terrifying, three-headed hound of Hades. There’s just one problem―Cerberus is the only thing preventing the hordes of the Underworld from entering the land of the living. Can Nico stop Eowulf from unleashing a zombie apocalypse?” — Amazon.com

“Nico Bravo and the Trial of Vulcan” by Mike Cavallaro — “Awesome fight sequences, imaginative onomatopoeia, and nonstop hilarity make for a brightly colored, fast-paced saga…Another on-brand entry in this fun, melting pot of mythologies.”―School Library Journal

“Prunella and the Cursed Skull Ring” by Matthew Loux — “This fun and spooky adventure has a twist that readers do not want to miss, and it serves as an effective and playful reminder to not judge based on appearances, encouraging young readers to be their most authentic selves.”―Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books

“Shark Princess” by Nidhi Chanani — “A finny, funny foray that encourages inclusivity even when it comes to play.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Sir Ladybug” by Corey R. Tabor — “Visual humor, tongue-in-cheek declarations, and knock-knock jokes add to the fun absurdity of a story that subverts the natural phenomenon of a bird eating a bug. An endearing testament to the joys of friendship.” — Kirkus Reviews

“Sir Ladybug and the Bookworms” by Corey R. Tabor — “Tabor keeps the laughs coming in this new addition to his wonderful graphic-reader series. Though the bookish jokes and underlying message about everyone being welcome at the library will make it a particular favorite among librarians, kids will get a kick out of the story’s elevation of a common scenario…into a full-blown quest.” — Booklist

“Sir Ladybug and the Queen Bee” by Corey R. Tabor -“A gentle but fiercely loyal ladybug knight is joined by his faithful herald (a roly-poly bug who gets a little nervous sometimes but loves to loudly tell anyone who’ll listen how great his friends are) and his steed/squire (a snail with a surprisingly spacious shell and a love of adventure) in Tabor’s first two installments of a graphic-novel series for the early-reader set. …” — The Horn Book-

“Smaller Sister” by Maggie Edkins Willis — “The accessible tone and format allow a difficult topic to be gently revealed with painful honesty balanced by humor and silliness… Compassionately approaches the stigma and mystery surrounding eating disorders.” ―Kirkus, starred review

“The Bad Guys in the Others?!” by Aaron Blabey — “This book instantly joins the classic ranks of Captain Underpants and The Stinky Cheese Man. We challenge anyone to read this and keep a straight face.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“The Cardboard Kingdom” by Chad Sell — “Readers may be inspired to craft their own cardboard kingdom after finishing the book. A must-have.”—School Library Journal, starred review

“The Cool Code” by Deirdre Langeland — “A humorous exploration of cracking the middle school social code for anyone craving more personified snarky llamas in their lives.” — School Library Journal

“The First Cat in Space Ate Pizza” by Mac Barnett — “Readers looking for the outer space high jinks and gentle humor of Brockington’s Catstronauts and the imaginative and fantastical worldbuilding of Andrews’s This Was Our Pact need look no further than this laugh-out-loud tale of the first cat in space.” — School Library Journal (starred review)

“The Wondrous Wonders” by Camille Jourdy — “This is a must-buy for any library, packed with humor and heart.” ―School Library Journal

“Wings of Fire: Moon Rising” by Tui Sutherland — “Peace has finally settled on the kingdom of Pyrrhia. The former “dragonets of destiny” have started an academy for young dragons like themselves. One promising student, Moonwatcher, begins to discover her own secret powers and must decide if she should use them when the academy is threatened.” — THE HORN BOOK, c2015.

YOUNG ADULT FICTION

“Anne of Greenville” by Mariko Tamaki — “Every page of this glittery disco ball of a book explodes with imagination, effervescence, and joy ― prepare to find a kindred spirit in this thoroughly modern Anne Shirley.”―Sarah Kuhn, author of From Little Tokyo, with Love

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

“A Quick & Easy Guide to Asexuality” by Molly Muldoon & Will Hernandez — “This is a clear-cut primer for readers looking to support an ace person in their own life or those questioning their own identity.” ― Publishers Weekly

“Arden High: Twelfth Grade Night” by Molly Booth — “High school pranks, youthful dialogue, and a bright color palette make for a fun and inviting comedy to dive into, and a charismatic supporting cast offers plenty of material for more Shakespearean hijinks in future volumes.” ―The Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books (starred review)

“Coming Back” by Jessi Zarbarsky — “A beautiful story of two young women who are so focused on proving they’re meant to be together that they end up hurting each other in the process. This gorgeous graphic novel is an LGTBQ+ romance about young love and how it can grow into something strong no matter what obstacles get in the way.” — Amazon.com

“Demon in the Wood” by Leigh Bardugo & Dani Pendergast — “An absolutely vital addition to the Shadow and Bone world…centering on the Darkling when he was just a boy, this tragic and beautiful story adds layers to the villain we know and the scared child he once was.” ― Nerdist

“Dinosaur Sanctuary” by Itaru Kinoshita — “A richly detailed manga about a rookie zookeeper learning how to care for dinosaurs of all shapes and sizes, sure to delight dinosaur lovers!” — Amazon.com

“Giantess: The Story of the Girl who Traveled the World in Search of Freedom” by J. C. Deveney — “A giant baby girl is found and adopted by a local family who bring her back to their village. She grows to become an even bigger giant, learning life’s lessons complicated even further by her enormous size and uniqueness. Can she weather a society that faces her with frightened hostility and prejudice to find live and, ultimately, the freedom to be herself? A wonderous, fantastical tale of feminism, difference, love, freedom, and the quest to be oneself.” — Publisher Annotation:

“Lore of Olympus: Volume Three” by Rachel Smythe — “If eyes could eat, [Lore Olympus] would be a feast. Smythe’s artistic style features bright washes of color and bold, suggestive lines. . . . It’s paced as a soap opera, all drawn-out tensions and long-simmering secrets, and I, for one, am thrilled to be along for the ride.”—New York Times Book Review

“Passport” by Sophia Glock — “A rare peek behind the curtain into life as the daughter of U.S. intelligence officers, this is a story full of secrets that expertly unfold one by one. …”―School Library Journal

“The Heartstopper Yearbook” by Alice Oseman — “Realistic yet uplifting, this tale of self-discovery will make readers’ hearts skip a beat.” — School Library Journal

“Tuki: Fight for Fire” by Jeff Smith — “Fans of classic adventure will not be disappointed… Smith (BONE) goes prehistoric in this fabulously drawn anthropological fantasy…. the characters and scenery remain consistently stunning to gaze at, page after page.” — PUBLISHERS WEEKLY

YOUNG ADULT NON-FICTION

“Braiding Sweetgrass for Young Adults: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants” by Robin Wall Kimmerer — “With informative sidebars, reflection questions, and art from illustrator Nicole Neidhardt, Braiding Sweetgrass for Young Adults brings Indigenous wisdom, scientific knowledge, and the lessons of plant life to a new generation.” — Amazon.com

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – NOVEMBER 2022

ADULT FICTION

“Hester” by Laurie Lico Albanese — “”This thoughtfully researched tale shines a light on the barriers faced by 19th-century women who did not conform.” ––Washington Post

“Secluded Cabin Sleeps Six” by Lisa Unger — “Embedded in a riveting novel of suspense is a revealing examination of the dangers inherent in public DNA sharing…[Lisa Unger] is in good form here, in her twentieth outing, and her fans will be eager to dive right in.” —Booklist

“The Inn at Tansy Falls” by Cate Woods — “A heartfelt contemporary about life, loss, and love that will utterly charm and delight readers and leave them clamoring for a follow-up.”―Booklist, Starred Review

“The Last Chairlift” by John Irving — “Here the consistent pleasure is an extended family whose distinctive voices deliver thoughtful messages of tolerance, understanding, and affection for those who are different.”—KIRKUS REVIEWS

“The Passenger” by Cormac McCarthy — “A rich story of an underachieving salvage diver in 1980 New Orleans… This thriller narrative is intertwined with the story of Western’s sister, Alicia… He dazzles with his descriptions of a beautifully broken New Orleans… The book’s many pleasures will leave readers aching for the final installment.”  —Publishers Weekly

“The Perfect Assassin” by James Patterson — “Grandson of action hero Doc Savage, nerdy professor Brandt Savage is pressed into a top-secret training program that re-creates him mentally and physically as The Perfect Assassin…” — LIBRARY JOURNAL, c2022.

ADULT MYSTERY

“The Butcher and the Wren” by Alaina Urquhart — ‘Urquhart has crafted a thriller that is necessarily graphic but not exploitative. The crisp detail, the narrative brevity and the blade-sharp connections between the pathologist and the killer all bode well for future installments.” —Sarah Weinman, New York Times

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“A Place Called Home” by David Ambroz — “[A] captivating debut…Galvanizing and compassionate, this personal account of survival should be required reading.”―Publishers Weekly

“Being Heumann: An Unrepentant Memoir of Disability Rights Activist” by Judith Heumann with Kristen Joiner — “Consider this book an inspiring call for inclusiveness, courage, equity, and justice as well as a reminder of people’s power to change the world for the better.” —Booklist

“Dying of Politeness” by Geena Davis — “Academy Award winner Davis makes an engaging literary debut with a candid, appealing memoir recounting her evolution from self-effacing young woman to feisty activist … An entertaining and ebullient memoir.” — Kirkus Reviews

“Invisible Storm: A Soldier’s Memoir of Politics and PTSD” by Jason Kander– “Kander displays a level of vulnerability not often seen in political memoirs, offering a bracing portrait of untreated PTSD and an insightful psychological profile of political ambition. Readers will appreciate the candor of this harrowing tale.” — Publishers Weekly

“Path Lit by Lightning: A Life by Jim Thorpe” by David Maraniss — “In the new biography Path Lit by Lightning, David Maraniss details the enormous odds that a Native American hero had to overcome. . . . He insists that taken as a whole, Jim Thorpe’s story is not one of prejudice, nor the hypocrisy of others. . . . [And] emphasizes that whatever life took from him, Thorpe persisted and trained and worked and learned and succeeded.” — Keith Olbermann ― The New York Times Book Review

“Somewhere Sisters: A Story of Adoption, Identity, and the Meaning of Family” by Erika Hayaskaki — “Hayasaki explores the many dimensions of transracial and transnational adoption in this moving account of families torn apart.”  ―The Cut

“Stay True” by Hua Hsu — “A moving portrait of friends, death, doubt, and everything in between. . . Hsu writes with tenderness but scorching precision. . . Genuinely one of the most moving portraits of friendship to have come out in recent years.” —The Nation

“Uncertain Fruit: A Memoir of Infertility, Loss and Love” by Rebecca and Sallyann Majoya — “A candid, unflinching look at a couple’s struggle to have a child of their own…By taking turns telling their story, moving back and forth in time and place, they have produced a skillfully woven narrative.” — Linda Peavy, poet and co-author of Frontier House

ADULT NON-FICTION

“A Girlhood: Letter to my Transgender Daughter” by Carolyn Hayes — “Hays here presents a different view of God—as a being of pure love that would never consider her daughter a mistake, but instead, a gift.”—Oprah Daily

“Art of Knitting Hats: 30 Easy-to-Follow Patterns to Create Your Own Colorwork Masterpiece” by Courtney Flynn — “This is a knitter’s dream introduction to colorwork! The designs in this book are whimsical, fun and sure to keep any knitter engaged from start to finish.” – Tif Neilan, creator of Tif Handknits

“Best Bike Rides in New England: Backroad Routes for Cycling the Northeast States” by David Sobel — “The Northeast provides some of the most exciting cycling in the United States: sweeping vistas, seaside towns, fall colors, and more. With this comprehensive guide, New Hampshire local David Sobel offers up rides in Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Maine.” — Amazon.com

“Ejaculate Responsibly: A Whole New Way to Think About Abortion” by Gabrielle Stanley Blair

“Forever Home: How We Turned our House Into a Haven for Abandoned, Abused and Misunderstood Dogs and Each Other” by Ron Danta — “… unforgettable, gut-wrenching story of how authors Robertshaw and Danta opened their hearts, homes, lives, and wallets to rescue over 13,000 dogs…. These two angels disguised as humans offer so much hope and love for animals—and invaluable lessons for readers.” — Booklist (starred review)

“Glucose Revolution: The Life Changing Power of Balancing Your Blood Sugar” by Jessie Inchauspe — “I hugely enjoyed reading this book; Jessie offers a detailed understanding of the problem which faces so many of us – how to balance our blood sugar levels – along with simple and accessible science-based hacks which really could help you transform your health.” —MICHAEL MOSLEY, M.D.,  #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Fast Diet

“No Choice: The Destruction of Roe V. Wade and the Fight to Protect a Fundamental American Right” by Becca Andrews — “Necessary in its racial and gender inclusivity, this thoughtful book will appeal to anyone looking to understand the way forward in a post-Roe world…An important book on a timely topic.”―Kirkus

“Playing God in the Meadow: How I Learned to Admire My Weeds” by Martha Leb Molnar — “A thoughtful tale of making a meadow, from a gardener who is not afraid to struggle with questions botanical and environmental.”―Sydney Landon Plum, author of Solitary Goose

“Smitten Kitchen Keepers: New Classics for Your Forever Files” by Deb Perelman — “Smitten Kitchen is not just a food blog: it is the food blog.” —The New Yorker

“Space Craze: America’s Enduring Fascination with Real and Imagined Spaceflight” by Margaret A. Weitekamp — “Weitekamp has produced an important book on the first great pillar of space travel: science fiction and the power of imagination. In a readable yet detailed manner, Weitekamp cleverly employs museum artifacts to reveal the ways objects capture elements of national identity and confirms once again that modern space travel is as much about the past as about the future.”—Howard McCurdy, author of Space and the American Imagination

“The Complete Modern Pantry: 350+ Ways to Cook Well with What’s on Hand” — “Flexibility is at the core of pantry cooking—when every cook needs to improvise. This unique guidehelps you get the most out of your own pantry by showing how ingredients add crunch, acid, umami, or spice to a dish.” — Amazon.com

“The Extraordinary Life of an Ordinary” by Paul Newman — “Raw reflections from a movie icon…a revealing memoir of a life marked by pain, grief, and regret…Intimate reflections on an extraordinary life steeped in sadness.” —Kirkus Reviews

“The Sleep Prescription: Seven Days to Unlocking Your Best Rest” by Aric A. Prather, PhD — “The Sleep Prescription is a practical guide to improving your sleep and enhancing your life. Prather offers a set of transfor­mative and doable changes in sleep habits that can make you healthier, happier, and more productive.” —Tom Boyce, MD, author of The Orchid and the Dandelion

“Wind Trees” by John Freeman — “With this collection, Freeman compels us to feel, in turns of turbulence and stillness, the longing and rage and wonder that visit anyone keenly and tenderly paying attention to the passage of human life in an uncertain landscape and time. Freeman’s poems become all at once like eulogy, like instruction, like acts of love.” —Pitchaya Sudbanthad

PICTURE BOOK

“Berry Song” by Michaela Goade
“Keepunumuk: Weeachumun’s Thanksgiving Story” by Danielle Greendeer, Anthony Perry and Alexis Bunt
“Kimchi, Kimchi Every Day” by Erica Kim
“More than Peach” by Bellen Woodard

JUVENILE BIOGRAPHY

“Finding My Dance” by Ria Thundercloud — “A moving picture book about the resilience one can find in one’s cultural inheritance.” —Kirkus Reviews

“The Eagle Huntress: The True Story of the Girl who Soared Beyond Expectations” by Aisholpan Nurgaiv with Liz Welsh — “Nurgaiv’s love for and pride in her homeland, culture, and family come through with quiet, persuasive power. An intriguing memoir from a girl who’s become a cultural icon.”―Kirkus

“The Vast Wonder of the World” by Melina Mangal — “Ernest Everett Just was not like other scientists of his time. He saw the whole, where others saw only parts. He noticed details others failed to see. He persisted in his research despite the discrimination and limitations imposed on him as an African American. …” —ONIX Annotations

JUVENILE FICTION

“Hear Me” by Kerry O’Malley Cerra — “Asterisks replace unheard words of dialogue in this moving middle grade novel, based on the author’s own life, that follows an adolescent girl’s struggle with both progressive hearing loss and her parents’ insistence that she get cochlear implants.”―The New York Times Book Review

YOUNG ADULT FICTION

“A Girl’s Guide to Love & Magic” by Debbie Rigaud — “Rigaud explores many elements of Haitian and Afro-Caribbean culture thoughtfully and with an admirable vulnerability as Cicely adventures down Eastern Parkway navigating stigma and magic, devils and allies, family legacies and shame en route to a rich, magical sort of self-discovery. Steeped in the magic of first kisses, family bonds, and joyful community.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“How Moon Fuentez Fell in Love with the Universe”by Raquel Vasquez Gilliland — “Amazingly realistic, this book is the coming-of-age story that teens need, wrapped in a gorgeously poetic package” — Booklist starred review

“Lakelore” by Anna-Maria McLemore — “An astonishingly beautiful love letter to neurodivergent and nonbinary teens cast amid a magical lake setting that will pull you in right along with the characters.” ―Booklist, starred review

“List of Ten” by Halli Gomez — “Told in the first person, this powerful novel takes readers into the emotional and physical depths of TS, feeling every pain and twitch. . . .This #OwnVoices novel gives insight into living with these conditions, and readers will ponder how friendship means more than being “perfect.”—School Library Journal

“Love from A to Z” by S. K. Ali — “In Love from A to Z, S.K. Ali once again takes an unflinching and moving look at the intricacies of life as a Muslim teen in an imperfect, multi-cultural world. Beautiful.” ― Shelf Awareness, starred review

“Meet Me in Mumbai” by Sabina Kahn — “Thought-provoking . . . compassionate . . . hopeful.” – Publishers Weekly

“Patron Saints of Nothing” by Randy Ribay — “Passionately and fearlessly, Ribay delves into matters of justice, grief, and identity.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

“The Life and Crimes of Hoodie Rosen” by Isaac Blum — “A sharply written coming-of-age story whose protagonist, like any teen, is figuring out where he fits in, under circumstances that are thought-provoking and at times heart-wrenching.” –Horn Book Magazine, *STARRED REVIEW*

“The Words in my Hands” by Asphyxia — “Part coming of age, part call to action, this fast-paced #ownvoices novel about a Deaf teenager is a unique and inspiring exploration of what it means to belong.” — Amazon.com

“TJ Powar has Something to Prove” by Jesmeen Kaur Deo — “In [a] poignant debut…Deo delivers a refreshing take on the familiar self-love narrative, portraying characters across the Indian diaspora whose determination to be themselves, irrespective of Western cultural perspectives, drives home the idea that the perception of oneself through a singular lens is often incomplete.”–Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Where Angels Pass” by Ellen Gable — “Ellen Gable tells a very personal and difficult story, Where Angels Pass, with such gentleness, love, and heartfelt honesty. What I expected to be an uncomfortable story ended up being a love story of a daughter for her father, a father who suffered the lifelong effects of something no young person should ever experience. Thank you, Ellen, for sharing this deeply moving story that will surely touch readers in a very profound way.” — Jim Sano, author, The Father’s Son

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – OCTOBER 2021

ADULT FICTION

“Civilizations” by Laurent Binet – “An ambitious and highly entertaining novel of revisionist history from the author of the international bestseller HHhH, Laurent Binet’s Civilizations is nothing less than a strangely believable counterfactual history of the modern world, fizzing with ideas about colonization, empire-building, and the eternal human quest for domination. It is an electrifying novel by one of Europe’s most exciting writers.” — McMillan Palgrave

“Cloud Cuckoo Land” by Anthony Doerr – “Doerr builds a community of readers and nature lovers that transcends the boundaries of time and space … This is just one of the many narrative miracles worked by the author as he brings a first-century story to its conclusion in 2146. As the pieces of this magical literary puzzle snap together, a flicker of hope is sparked for our benighted world.” Kirkus, starred review

“Crossroads” by Jonathan Franzen — “Franzen returns with a sweeping and masterly examination of the shifting culture of early 1970s America, the first in a trilogy . . . Throughout, Franzen exhibits his remarkable ability to build suspense through fraught interpersonal dynamics. It’s irresistible.” ―Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Light from Uncommon Stars” by Ryka Aoki — “Aoki’s novel is an exciting, wild web of an adventure, an unputdownable book about music, found family, and identity. Diving into the tough subjects, Aoki’s book emerges with a joyful, queer, radical ballad of a story. . .”―Booklist, starred review

“State of Terror” by Hilary Rodham Clinton and Louise Penny — “Consistently entertaining….Penny and Clinton demonstrate a sure hand at international intrigue and narrative pacing….The real key to ‘State of Terror,’ though, is its secret weapon: female friendship.” ― The Washington Post

“The Lincoln Highway” by Amor Towles — “[A] playfully thought-provoking novel . . . [Towles] juggles the pieces of his plot deftly, shifting from voice to voice, skirting sentimentality and quirkiness with a touch of wistful regret, and leading up to an ending that is bound to provoke discussion.” Booklist (starred)

ADULT MYSTERY

“Nerve Attack” by S. Lee Manning — “Manning writes with such authority about the shady world and shifting loyalties of the intelligence community, it’s a wonder her novels aren’t riddled with redactions. At once terrifying, unpredictable, and all too believable, NERVE ATTACK will leave you breathless.” –Chris Holm, Anthony award winning author of The Killing Kind.

“To Kill the Messenger” by Philip S. Cook — This is the story of Russell Griswold—an itinerant newspaper editor—who came to northern New Mexico after the Civil War to start a weekly newspaper in the small town of San Miguel. He hoped to earn a modest living and help build a thriving and vibrant community.

Griswold’s published comments on activities that he finds unlawful or inappropriate were often cruel and demeaning. Ultimately this leads to a sudden and violent attempt on his life.

There is any number of possible suspects whether aggrieved or not. … So, who would want to kill a newspaper editor?” — Blurb, Inc.

ADULT NON-FICTION

“My Grandmother’s Hands: Racialized Trauma and the Pathway to Mending Our Hearts and Bodies” by Resmaa Menakem — “My Grandmother’s Hands is full of wisdom and understanding. In it, Resmaa Menakem offers a new way to understand racism and, more importantly, to heal it. This book lays out a path to freedom and peace, first for individual readers, then for our culture as a whole. A must-read for everyone who cares about our country.”―Nancy Van Dyken, LP, LICSW, author of Everyday Narcissism

“Peril” by Bob Woodward and Robert Costa — “Woodward and Costa make a powerful case that America has had a narrow escape. It leaves all Americans, in particular the Republican Party, with some thinking to do”—Justin Webb, The Times, UK.

“To Save The People From Themselves”: The Emergence of American Judicial Review and the Transformation of the Constitutions” by Robert J. Steinfeld — “… Robert Steinfeld examines how the distinctive US form of constitutional review emerged from a background tradition in which legislatures and executives assessed constitutionality in their regular work. Combining institutional, political, and intellectual history, Professor Steinfeld shows how the transformation was both rapid and strongly contested. Seeing judicial review as part of a conservative counterrevolution against the democratic excesses of post-Revolutionary legislatures, this is an important new contribution to long-standing discussions about judicial review in the United States.” — Mark Tushnet, William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law Emeritus, Harvard Law School

“Voices from the Pandemic: Americans Tell Their Stories of Crisis, Courage and Resilience” by Eli Saslow — “Saslow has done a sterling job of capturing real people’s experiences of the start of the pandemic.” –Tampa Bay Times

VERMONT NON-FICTION

“Vermont History: Volume 89, No. 2, Summer/Fall 2021”

PARENTING

“Hunt, Gather, Parent: What Ancient Cultures Can Teach Us About the Lost Art of Raising Happy, Helpful Little Humans” by Michaeleen Doucleff, Ph. D. — “Hunt, Gather, Parent is full of smart ideas that I immediately wanted to force on my own kids. (I wish I’d read it at the start of the pandemic, when I made their chore charts.) Doucleff is a dogged reporter who’s good at observing families and breaking down what they’re doing.”
—Pamela Druckerman, The New York Times Book Review

“Parenting 4 Social Justice: Tips, Tools, and Inspiration for Conversations & Action with Kids” by Angela Berkfield — “Berkfield, a social justice training facilitator and cofounder of the Root Social Justice Center, has written this volume with five co-authors…. Each chapter starts with questions for reflection that can be used as starting points for further conversation with kids. The book teaches how to build seven social justice principles into discussion and action, then shows how to apply these principles to racial, economic, gender, and disability justice. Berkfield asserts that people gain personal power when their basic needs are met; then violence, addiction, or isolation can begin to abate.” — Julia M. Reffner. LIBRARY JOURNAL

“The Life of Fred: Edgewood” by Stanley F. Schmidt Ph. D. — “This is a child-directed course. The student reads the adventure story, does the math problems that occur as a natural part of the story, and checks their answers (the solutions are right there for the looking.) And learns to love math in the process! You will not get the detailed formula explanations that you get in a traditional math book. I am still amazed that kids can read the story and learn the concepts, but they do!” — Amazon.com

“Zillions of Practice Problems: Fractions” by Stanley F. Schmidt Ph. D. — “Practice problems for the first book in the Life of Fred Upper Elementary/Middle School Series. Need more practice with fractions? Zillions of Practice Problems Fractions has you covered” — Amazon.com

ITEMS

Orion StarBlast Telescope

PICTURE BOOK

“A Day with Yayah” by Nicola I. Campbell
“All the Way to the Top: How One Girl’s Fight for Americans with Disabilities Changed Everything” by Annette Bay Pimentl
“Bodies are Cool” by Tyler Feder
“Bright Star” by Yuyi Morales
“Change Sings: A Children’s Anthem” by Amanda Gorman
“Einstein: The Fantastic Journey of a Mouse through Space and Time” by Torben Kuhlmann
“How Many Seeds in a Pumpkin?” by Margaret McNamara
“Listen” by Gabi Snyder
“Little Witch Hazel: A Year in the Forest” by Phoebe Wahl
“Over and Under the Canyon” by Kate Messner
“Peace Train” by Cat Stevens
“The First Blade of Sweetgrass: A Native American Story” by Suzanne Greenlaw and Gabriel Frey
“The Memory Box: A Book About Grief” by Joanna Rowland
“The Rhythm of the Rain” by Grahame Baker-Smith
“The Tree in Me” by Corinna Luyken
They, She, He, Me: Free to Be!” by Maya and Matthew Smith-Gonzalez
“Tomatoes for Neela” by Padma Lakshmi
“Tough Guys (Have Feelings Too)” by Keith Negley

JUVENILE BIOGRAPHY

“Chance: Escape from Holocaust” by Uri Shulevitz — “Though touching on many dark and serious topics, this story is totally focused on the fears, triumphs, and sensibilities of a child. It is truly a portrait of an artist as a young man thrust into a maelstrom of a world gone mad and relying on chance to decide his fate.” ―The Horn Book, starred review

JUVENILE FICTION

“365 Days to Alaska” by Cathy Carr — “Carr’s heartfelt debut features classic middle-school problems, like dodging mean kids, as well as Rigel’s vivid feelings of displacement and deep love for nature.”  ― Booklist

“Ara Shah and the End of Time” by Roshani Chokshi — “In her middle-grade debut, Chokshi spins a fantastical narrative that seamlessly intertwines Hindu cosmology and folklore, feminism, and witty dialogue for an uproarious novel for young readers. Chokshi comes into her own in this novel, reminding readers of the power of language and of stories.”―Kirkus (starred review)

“Barefoot Dreams of Petra Luna” by Alda P. Dobbs — “Historical fiction that is as relevant as ever…A timeless and timely tale of one girl’s journey to save her family and discover herself.” ― Kirkus Reviews

Eugenia Lincoln and the Unexpected Package” by Kate DiCamillo — “As in the earlier books, believable (if eccentric) personalities, sophisticated vocabulary, and polished prose make this an inviting title for emerging chapter- book readers. Fans of this series and the earlier Mercy Watson books will be amazed by Eugenia’s partial redemption and delight that the results are merely temporary.” —Booklist

Finding Junie Kim” by Ellen Oh — “She seamlessly provides insight into Korean history and culture for the unintroduced and captures the human condition during wartime through frank portrayals of Junie’s modern-day struggles…Oh’s powerful novel sheds light on the devastating effect racism can have, and tells a history often overlooked.” — School Library Journal (starred review)

“Healer of the Water Monster” by Brian Young — “The deeply grounded and original perspective of this story brings readers into both the worlds of Navajo blessing songs, rain songs, and traditional healing and everyday family relationships. Hands readers a meaningful new take on family love.” — Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“Kaleidoscope” by Brian Selznick — “Selznick and Serlin take the easy reader format to new creative heights….The sharp pacing and charming humor also make it an excellent read-aloud choice….as funny as it is elegant. This will be enjoyed equally by youngsters and their grown-ups.” — School Library Journal, starred review

“King and the Dragonflies” by Kacen Callender — “Callender masterfully balances resonant themes of grief, love, family, friendship, racism, sexuality, and coming-of-age…deeply affecting, memorable.”-The Horn Book, starred review

“Let’s Mooove!” by Courtney Sheinmel — “Travel around the United States of America with twins Finn and Molly in this new chapter book series that highlights a different state in each book! … We must be dreaming! That’s what twins Finn and Molly Parker think when they discover a camper in their driveway–and it talks! When the RV transports them to a cattle ranch in Colorado, the twins know something magical has happened. Then the camper disappears, leaving Finn and Molly to wonder . . . how are we going to get home?..” — ONIX annotations

“Long Lost” by Jacqueline West — “In a spooky middle grade love letter to libraries and the mystery genre, West crafts a spellbinding exploration of sisterhood. . . . Alternating a contemporary third-person narrative with the found book’s parallel telling, West draws readers into a supernaturally tinged dual story, simultaneously offering an authentic portrait of sibling angst.” — Publishers Weekly

“Paradise on Fire” by Jewell Parker Rhodes — “Placing biracial boyhood and the struggles of colorism at its center, the novel challenges readers to pursue their own self-definition.”―Kirkus

“Rez Dogs” by Joseph Bruchac — “Hidden throughout this moving novel in verse, old stories are discovered like buried treasures.”—Kirkus, starred review

“Set Me Free” by Ann Clare LeZotte — “Full of adventure and twists, and LeZotte never shies away from addressing racism, ableism, or sexism…the book’s themes resonate today, as Mary fights for the rights of all people and offers hope to readers facing challenges. A gripping tale of historical fiction.” — Booklist

The Beatryce Prophecy” by Kate DiCamillo — “The incomparable Kate DiCamillo offers a lovely fable of a girl, a monk and a goat, a tale that is a testament of the power of love (as so many of her books are) and the power of the written word to change the world for the better.” —The Buffalo News

“The Ickabog” by J. K. Rowlings — “Once upon a time there was a tiny kingdom called Cornucopia, as rich in happiness as it was in gold, and famous for its food. From the delicate cream cheeses of Kurdsburg to the Hopes-of-Heaven pastries of Chouxville, each was so delicious that people wept with joy as they ate them. But even in this happy kingdom, a monster lurks. Legend tells of a fearsome creature living far to the north in the Marshlands… the Ickabog. Some say it breathes fire, spits poison, and roars through the mist as it carries off wayward sheep and children alike. Some say it’s just a myth… And when that myth takes on a life of its own, casting a shadow over the kingdom, two children – best friends Bert and Daisy – embark on a great adventure to untangle the truth and find out where the real monster lies, bringing hope and happiness to Cornucopia once more.” — Publisher Annotation:

“The Last Fallen Star” by Graci Kim — “From a compelling and endearing supporting cast to the rich and tantalizing Korean cuisine explored in its pages, this pays homage to traditional Korean magic and mythos while infusing it with a contemporary story line and characters readers will fall in love with in an instant. Riley’s unmistakable voice and her relatable search for and exploration of her identity will connect with readers at their cores, offering a truly promising start to a fantastical series.”―Booklist (starred review)

“The Storm Runner” by Jennifer Cervantes — “J. C. Cervantes is about to take you on a trip you will never forget, through the darkest, strangest, and funniest twists and turns of Maya myth. You will meet the scariest gods you can imagine, the creepiest denizens of the Underworld, and the most amazing and unlikely heroes who have to save our world from being ripped apart.”―Rick Riordan

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Draw a Comic!” by J. P. Coovert — “…With Maker Comics: Draw a Comic! you’ll learn to create and print your own comics books! Follow these simple steps to sketch out your story ideas and ink a comic page. Learn which art supplies are best for drawing comics—you can use a pen, a brush, or even a computer! With the help of photocopy machine, you can even self-publish your own comics and share them with your friends!” — Amazon.com

“History Smashers: The Titanic” by Kate Messner — “Critical, respectful, engaging: exemplary history for children.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Snapdragon” by Kat Leh — “Snapdragon invigorates a classic hero’s journey with magic and heart.”―The AV Club

“The Girl from the Sea” by Molly Knox Ostergag — “Fifteen-year-old Morgan has a secret: She can’t wait to escape the perfect little island where she lives. She’s desperate to finish high school and escape her sad divorced mom, her volatile little brother, and worst of all, her great group of friends…who don’t understand Morgan at all. Because really, Morgan’s biggest secret is that she has a lot of secrets, including the one about wanting to kiss another girl. Then one night, Morgan is saved from drowning by a mysterious girl named Keltie. The two become friends and suddenly life on the island doesn’t seem so stifling anymore.But Keltie has some secrets of her own. And as the girls start to fall in love, everything they’re each trying to hide will find its way to the surface…whether Morgan is ready or not.” — Publisher Annotation:

“The Golden Compass: The Graphic Novel” by Stephanie Melchior-Durand — “Now, in this graphic novel adaptation of The Golden Compass, the world of His Dark Materials is brought to visual life. The stunning full-color art will offer both new and returning readers a chance to experience the story of Lyra, an ordinary girl with an extraordinary role to play in the fates of multiple worlds, in an entirely fresh way. This volume collects the full journey of Lyra to the far north, her rescue of the kidnapped children at Bolvangar, her escape via hot-air balloon, and her crucial role in Lord Asriel s ambitions to build a bridge to another world.” — ONIX Annotations

“The Way of the Hive: A Honey Bee’s Story” by Jay Hosler — “Graphic novel fans, lovers of nonfiction, budding ecologists, and readers looking for their next great obsession will be buzzing around this title for years to come.” — Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“This Place: 150 Years Retold” by various authors — “Ambitious in scope and strong in execution, this collection succeeds in prompting readers to remember (or learn) Indigenous history “Elisa Gall The Horn Book Magazine

“Tom’s Midnight Garden: A Graphic Adaption of the Philippa Pearce Classic” by Edith — ““[Edith’s] fine-lined figures, sketchy shading, stylish shapes, and muted palette of natural tones balance a modern look with the old-fashioned story. Perfect for fans of time-travel adventures or fantasies with a  smidgen of historical fiction.” — Booklist

“Treasure in the Lake” by Jason Pamment — “This story is astonishing enough to leave people speechless.” — Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

JUVENILE NON-FICTION

“Design like Nature: Biomimicry for a Healthy Planet” by Megan Clendenan —
“The approachable text, supported by lots of captioned photos, spotlights some of nature’s more remarkable innovations and some engineering feats inspired by nature.” ― The Horn Book

“Mad for Ads: How Advertising Gets (and Stays) in Our Heads” by Erica Fyvie — “This upbeat, up-to-date look at advertising helps young readers understand just how insidious marketing can be.” ―Booklist

“Master of Disguise; Camouflaging Creatures & Magnificent Mimics” by Marc Martin — “Martin highlights the lives and disguises of one dozen animals hailing from habitats from every continent but Antarctica, with camouflaged-animal searches. Captivating watercolor art immediately draws you in. . . Both art and text enhance scientific accuracy with beauty and playfulness—a rare feat. Sturdy pages, too. Do not hide this book!”
Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“Our World Out of Balance: Understanding Climate Change and What We Can Do” by Andrea Minogloi — “A great starting place to understand climate change and its effects.” Booklist

“Out of the Blue: How Animals Evolved from Prehistoric Seas” by Elizabeth Shreeve — “This short book guides the reader from the beginnings of life eons ago through to the present day, beginning with an Earth devoid of life and following water-dwelling, single-celled creatures that develop and change as they move “out of the blue” and onto land. The text explains the adaptations that were necessary for animals to live out of the water, as well as how some animals survived (and how others didn’t) during the several extinction events that Earth has suffered.” —School Library Connection

Pearl Harbor” by Kate Messner — “Kate Messner serves up fun, fast history for kids who want the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth. Absolutely smashing!” —Candace Fleming, award-wining author

Pie for Breakfast: A Baking Book for Children” by Cynthia Cliff — “A beautifully illustrated baking book for children featuring recipes for delicious treats along with a powerful message about family, diversity, and helping others.” — Random House, Inc.

“Rescuing Titanic” by Flora Delargy — “This gorgeously illustrated tale of heroes and hope amid one of the most well-known marine tragedies of all time is a must buy for collections serving curious readers of all ages fascinated by the Titanic.”  ―Emily Beasley, Omaha Public Sch., NE, School Library Journal, starred review

Stamped (for Kids): Racism: Antiracism and You” by Sonja Cherry-Paul — “Readers who want to truly understand how deeply embedded racism is in the very fabric of the U.S., its history, and its systems will come away educated and enlightened. Worthy of inclusion in every home and in curricula and libraries everywhere. Impressive and much needed.”―Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“The American Revolution” by Keat Messner — “Critical, respectful, engaging: exemplary history for children.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“The Guide to Woodworking with Kids: Craft Projects to Develop the Lifelong Skills of Young Makers” by Doug Stowe –“… This comprehensive guide offers step by step instruction for teachers, parents and grandparents to offer safe woodworking opportunities to their students and kiddos as a way of developing a wide range of valuable life-skills. … The Guide to Woodworking with Kids is more than a woodworking book, it’s gives parents, grandparents and teachers the confidence, encouragement, and the insight needed to safely engage children in life-enhancing creative arts.” — ONIX annotations

The People Remember” by Ibi Aanu Zoboi — “This immaculately illustrated picture book walks through a vast swath of history… Zoboi’s poetic retrospective breathes life into Black history narratives and reverently celebrates Black lives.” — Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

YOUNG ADULT FICTION

“Call Me Athena: Girl from Detroit” by Colby Cedar Smith — “This story of an immigrant girl growing up in Detroit in the 1930s hits every mark. Woven into the story are her parents’ histories and all the love and loss the family has faced. It will tug your heartstrings.” — (American Booksellers Association)

“Defy the Night” by Brigid Kemmerer — “The slow-burn romance-between an idealist with straightforward moral beliefs and a pragmatist trapped by duty-will keep the pages turning, as will the scheming of the king’s consuls and the rebellion brewing in the background . . . . The personal and the political intertwine in this engaging series opener.” ―Kirkus Reviews

Lobizona” by Romina Garber — “In a timely work of magical realism featuring references to Borges and Garcia Márquez, Garber tackles issues of nationalism, identity, and belonging…This layered novel blends languages and cultures to create a narrative that celebrates perseverance.” – PUBLISHERS WEEKLY (Starred Review)

Me (Moth)” by Amber McBride — “This searing debut novel-in-verse is told from the perspective of Moth, a Black teen whose life changed forever the day a car crash killed her family. … Each free verse poem is tightly composed, leading into the next for a poignant and richly layered narrative. The story builds softly and subtly to a perfect, bittersweet ending. Fans of Jacqueline Woodson won’t be able to put this one down.”―School Library Journal, starred review

On the Come Up” by Angie Thomas — “With sharp, even piercing, characterization, this indelible and intricate story of a young girl who is brilliant and sometimes reckless, who is deeply loved and rightfully angry at a world that reduces her to less than her big dreams call her to be, provides many pathways for readers.” — Horn Book (starred review)

The Dead and the Dark” by Courtney Gould — “Gould’s supernaturally spooky debut is filled with all manner of creepy inventiveness…an intriguing read.” – Publishers Weekly

“The Last Legacy” by Adrienne Young — “In this sumptuously rendered historical novel, Young deftly explores concepts of family, loyalty, and growing into one’s destiny.” – Publishers Weekly

“The Dead and the Dark” by Courtney Gould — “Gould’s supernaturally spooky debut is filled with all manner of creepy inventiveness…an intriguing read.” – Publishers Weekly by Charlotte Nicole Davis

“The Wild Ones: A Broken Anthem for a Girl Nation” by Nafiza Azad — “A powerful feminist account of sisterhood, the longevity of pain, and the reclamation of power.” ― Kirkus Reviews

There Will Come a Darkness” by Katy Rose Pool — “[S]et apart by its immersive worldbuilding and compelling narrators.” ―Shelf Awareness, STARRED review

YOUNG ADULT NON-FICTION

I Will Always Write Back: How One Letter Changed Two Lives” by Caitlin Alifirenka — “The remarkable tenacity of these two souls pulled like magnets across the world by their opposite polarities – one committed to helping, the other to surviving – is deeply affecting…It’s quite a little miracle of unexpected genuineness.”―New York Times Book Review

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

A Girl Called Echo” by Katherena Vermette — “Henderson’s realistic art and perfect pacing, particularly in the pages of wordless panels depicting Echo’s daily routine, highlight her silent nature and hint at the source of her unspoken sadness. Solitary teens are likely to strongly identify with Echo and look forward to more of her adventures. ― Booklist

“Nubia: The Real One” by L. L. McKinney — “… with endearing and expressive art by Robyn Smith, comes a vital story for today about equality, identity, and kicking it with your squad.” — Amazon.com