Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – OCTOBER 2023

ADULT FICTION

“Around the World in Eighty Days: A New Translation” by Jules Verne — “This new and completely original translation of Around the World in Eighty Days renders Jules Verne’s classic novel in a style that is both more understandable and more faithful to the spirit of the original French text than the commonly reprinted older English editions.” — Amazon.com

“Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead” by Olga Tokarczuk — “While it adopts the straightforward structure of a murder mystery, [the book features] macabre humor and morbid philosophical interludes [that] are distinctive to its author. . . [and an] excellent payoff at the finale. . . . As for Ms. Tokarczuk, there’s no doubt: She’s a gifted, original writer, and the appearance of her novels in English is a welcome development.”— The Wall Street Journal

“Land of Milk and Honey” by C. Pam Zhang — “Gloriously lush. Zhang’s sensuous style makes us see, smell and, above all, taste the lure of that sun-dappled mountain enclave. . . An atmospheric and poetically suspenseful novel about all manner of appetites: for power, food, love, life.”—NPR/Fresh Air

“North Woods” by Daniel Mason — “Brilliantly combines the granularity of realism with the timeless, shimmering allure of myth. . .Sui generis fiction . . . The forest and the trees: Mason keeps both in clear view in his eccentric and exhilarating novel.”—The New York Times Book Review

“The Horsewoman” by James Patterson and Mike Lupica — “This “hugely entertaining, riveting page-turner” (Louise Penny) follows the complicated relationship between mother and daughter as they face off in the Olympics—and into a ride they can barely control.” — Amazon.com

ADULT MYSTERY

“The Logmire Defense” by Craig Johnson — “[A] standout . . . The whodunit, which presents a dizzying number of red herrings, is one of Johnson’s trickiest, keeping readers deliciously off-balance throughout. Series newcomers will have no problem jumping into the action, and longtime readers will relish the dive into Longmire’s family history.” —Publishers Weekly

BLUE/DVD MOVIES

“Barbie”

BOARD BOOK

“Bizzy Bear: My First Memory Game: Vehicles” by Benji Davies
“Bizzy Bear: Pet Vet” by Benji Davies

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Lost Legends of Nothing” by Alejandra Green and Fanny Rodriquez — “In vibrant lineless art that’s reminiscent of classic animated films, Green and Rodriguez bring the castles, towns, and forests in the world of Nothing to life with expressive characters, a smattering of Spanish and Esperanto, and a strong cliffhanger that leaves room for a second installment.”  — Publishers Weekly

JUVENILE DVD MOVIES

“Elemental”
“The Little Mermaid”

JUVENILE NON-FICTION

“Climate Warriors: Fourteen Scientists and Fourteen Ways We Can Save Our Planet” by Laura Gehl — “The featured climate warriors are not only a balanced mix of men and women scientists with racial and ethnic diversity, but they also depict an amazing array of science itself, from ecology and materials science to psychology and economics.”―Booklist

“Detector Dogs, Dynamite Dolphins and More Animals with Super Sensory Powers” by Christina Couch and Cara Giaimo — “A perfect book for animal lovers, this narrative nonfiction book is a fascinating read about animals with super senses and how they can use those senses to help people complete important and frequently unusual tasks. . . the upbeat and entertaining text combined with the high-interest subject matter makes this book a great choice.” —School Library Connection

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

“A First Time for Everything” by Dan Santat — “Dan’s book manages to capture all the things that make you fall in love in the first place―awkwardness, humor, a bit of teen pathos, and most of all, sincerity and vulnerability.” ―LEUYEN PHAM, New York Times-bestselling illustrator of the Friends series

Categories
Highlighted New Arrivals

Monsters and Mold

Asia Citro

“Monsters and Mold” by Asia Citro — “Citro takes the “girl helping animals” trope of beginning chapters to a whole new level. Filled with scientific language and experiments, including a helpful glossary, Zoey is encouraged to make mistakes, fail, and get up and keep trying. There’s no lack of child appeal either; both boys and girls will delight in the magical creatures and brisk storytelling and will be eager to try some of their own scientific experimentation, even if they can’t find a dragon!” — Jennifer Wharton, Jean Little Library

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – JULY 2023

ADULT FICTION

“Palazzo” by Danielle Steel — “The head of her family’s haute couture Italian leather brand, Cosima Saverio, partnering with France’s most successful handbag company, must make an impossible choice when her brother loses a hefty sum at the casino and his debt must be repaid with money or his life”– Baker & Taylor

“The Beach at Summerly” By Beatriz Williams — “Full of evocative, whip-sharp dialogue… [T]he author’s deft exploration of many thought-provoking issues, from social class to personal responsibility and regret, make this one a winner. A well-researched exploration of love and redemption against the backdrop of post-World War II New England”  — Kirkus Reviews

“The First Ladies” by Marie Benedict & Victoria Christopher Murray —
“While the depictions of the women’s activism are inspiring, the novel really shines in the behind-the-scenes moments when the women support each other during personal struggles with marital infidelity, illness, and loss. This impeccably researched, relevant novel is a must-read and destined to be a book-club favorite.” —Booklist (starred review)

“The Ice Harp” by Norman Lock — “In The Ice Harp, Norman Lock deftly takes us into the polyphonic swirl of Emerson’s mind at the end of his life, inviting us to meet the man anew even as the philosopher fights to stop forgetting himself. Who will I be when the words are gone, the great thinker wonders, and how will I know what is right? I gladly asked myself these same impossible questions on every page of this remarkably empathetic and deeply moral novel.” —Matt Bell, author of Appleseed and Refuse to Be Done

“The Long March Home” by Marcus Brotherton & Tosca Lee — “Inspired by a true story, three best friends from Mobile, Alabama are captured in the Philippines during WWII–they vow to return home together. They struggle to survive against impossible odds that becomes known as the Bataan Death March”– Baker & Taylor

ADULT MYSTERY

“Dead Man’s Wake” by Paul Doiron — “Doiron creates an array of colorful, well-drawn characters, writes in vivid, graceful style, and accurately portray investigative procedures ― this time including the handling of underwater crime scenes. He spins his tale with enough twists and turns to keep readers guessing until the end.” ―Associated Press

BLUE/DVD MOVIES

“Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret”

JUVENILE FICTION

“Monsters and Mold” by Asia Citro — “Citro takes the “girl helping animals” trope of beginning chapters to a whole new level. Filled with scientific language and experiments, including a helpful glossary, Zoey is encouraged to make mistakes, fail, and get up and keep trying. There’s no lack of child appeal either; both boys and girls will delight in the magical creatures and brisk storytelling and will be eager to try some of their own scientific experimentation, even if they can’t find a dragon!” — Jennifer Wharton, Jean Little Library

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Adventuregame Comics: Leviathan” by Jason Shiga — “Shiga captures that thrill of limitless possibility in this choose-your-own-path style maze of a comic book wonder… The tantalizing glimpses of un-had adventures as you flip through pages on your current quest; and the labyrinth-winding, squat-figured, goggle-eyed fun of Shiga’s art all invite many return reads.”―Booklist

“Making Friends” by Kristen Gudnuk — “This charming graphic novel features full-color, manga-inspired illustrations and a breezy plot that blends wish fulfillment and fantasy with an approachable and contemporary storyline. With a broad brush, Gudsnuk hits many of the angst-y issues of middle school, including popularity, bullying, family relationships, body image, and fandom, creating appeal for a large swath of readers… A nifty pastiche of middle school matters.” — Kirkus Reviews

“Schnozzer and Tatertoes: Take Hike” by Rick Stromoski — “If you like funny, silly dogs (and who doesn’t), this book is for you!”—Patrick McDonnell, Mutts cartoonist and author of Me . . . Jane 

“The Mighty Bite” by Nathan Hale — “In this quirky graphic offering, two extinct creatures team up with a human reporter. Hale’s tale, executed in blue and white with strong black linework, is unapologetically zany, replete with poop jokes, an adorable talking kitten head, a giant hair dryer, and a gorilla deity sporting a halo that is also a portal, making this a perfect choice for those who find joy in madcap comics in the vein of James Kolchalka. Kooky charmer. An exuberantly goofy romp.” — Kirkus Reviews

JUVENILE NON-FICTION

“Search for a Giant Squid: Pick Your Path” by Amy Seto Forrester and Andy Chou Musser — “An engaging, fun, and deep guide to how sea research happens.” ― Kirkus Reviews 

Categories
Highlighted New Arrivals

What Lane?

Torrey Maldonado

“Engaging, timely novel. . . . Maldonado (Tight) paints a vivid, relatable picture of an adventurous boy learning the rewards and dangers of straying out of his lane against the backdrop of an unfair system that could see him killed or arrested for the behaviors his white peers easily engage in. The characters are warmly realistic, by turns impulsive and regretful. In relatively few words, Maldonado elucidates matters related to racial profiling, police violence against black people, and allyship, all through the eyes of a brave kid trying to figure out who he is and where he belongs.”—Publishers Weekly, starred review

Categories
Highlighted New Arrivals

Amari and the Night Brothers

B. B. Alston

“In this thrilling debut, Alston thrusts his intrepid heroine into a setting packed with magic, mythical creatures, and danger. Amari, a Black girl with limited means, confronts privilege and prejudice even while delving into a world of wonder, humor, and adventure, making this a sure-to-please winner.” — Publishers Weekly (starred review)

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – APRIL 2023

ADULT FICTION

“Hang the Moon” by Jeannette Walls — “A rip-roaring, action-packed novel set during prohibition filled with head-spinning plot twists and enough dead bodies, doomed romances, and sudden betrayals to make you wonder if George R.R. Martin had decided to ditch fantasy for Southern Gothic.” —The New York Times 

“Happy Place “ by Emily Henry — “If you’re looking for a magical second-chance romance that will make your heart ache and read compulsively to find out what happened to the perfect couple (and whether they’ll get their happily ever after), then Happy Place is sure to keep you up all night!”
The Nerd Daily

“Homecoming” by Kate Morton — “Morton keeps the secrets coming, leading up to a powerful, emotional conclusion. This is storytelling at its finest.” — Booklist (starred review)

“Old Babes in the Wood” by Margaret Atwood — “Atwood explores love and loss in this brilliant collection that mixes fantastical stories about the afterlife with realism…She’s writing at the top of her considerable powers here.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“The Librarian of Burned Books” by Brianna Labuskes — “Inspired by the fascinating real story of a little-known World War II-era group of librarians, authors, publishers, and booksellers who united to fight fascism with literature, THE LIBRARIAN OF BURNED BOOKS is a thoroughly engrossing page-turner that proves how powerful words and ideas can be, no matter the era. Filled with intrigue and secrets, this timely novel follows three women from Berlin to Paris to New York City to right past wrongs using books as their weapon of choice._ — Elise Hooper, author of Angels of the Pacific

“We All Want Impossible Things” by Catherine Newman — “Excruciatingly heartbreaking, but I laughed out loud on almost every page. And I am not an easy laughter. Newman’s voice is hilarious and warm; her characters feel like old friend . . . a winning novel.” — Julie Klam, New York Times Book Review

“Weyward” by Emilia Hart — “A promising debut…Hart links the three stories very cleverly in this entertaining read about witchcraft, maternal ties and the power of the natural world.” ––The Times (UK)

ADULT MYSTERY

“A Heart Full of Headstones” by Ian Rankin — “Outstanding. . . the well-constructed plot is matched by brooding, atmospheric prose. This is one of Rankin’s best Rebus novels in years.”―Publishers Weekl

“Murder in an Irish Castle” by Verity Bright — “I am hooked! This is the best book, bar none, that I have read this year… An extremely witty, fast-paced mystery… I love the heroine, intrepid adventuress… A most enjoyable read!” — Reviews by Carol in Tallahassee

“Simply Lies” by David Baldacci — “Baldacci is at his best in this standalone thriller. [He] keeps the twists coming fast and furious in this tense page-turner, never losing credibility even as it takes bigger and bigger swings. Readers will fall in love with Mickey and hold their breath for her through to the very end.”―Publishers Weekly, starred review

“The Housemaid” by Freida McFadden — “Don’t miss the USA Today bestseller and addictive psychological thriller with a jaw-dropping twist that’s burning up Instagram–Freida McFadden’s The Housemaid is perfect for fans of Ruth Ware, Lisa Jewell, and Verity.” — Grand Central Publishing

“The Last Remains” by Elly Griffiths — “The discovery of a missing woman’s bones force Ruth and Nelson to finally confront their feelings for each other as they desperately work to exonerate one of their own in this not-to-be-missed Ruth Galloway mystery from USA Today bestselling author Elly Griffiths….” — Publisher Annotation:

“The White Lady” by Jacqueline Winspear — “The White Lady is a phenomenal read. You are prisoner from the opening paragraph until the suspenseful conclusion . . . .This thrilling book reveals much about mankind. Humans can be brutal, tender, kind, treacherous, cold, friendly, tremendously loyal, deceiving, brave, cowardly. Jacqueline Winspear includes all of these traits in The White Lady.” — New York Journal of Books

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“Master, Slave, Husband, Wife: An Epic Journey from Slavery to Freedom” by Ilyon Woo — “Master Slave Husband Wife is a suspenseful, sensitively rendered account of [Ellen and William Craft’s] four-day journey to the North. . . . Woo tells the story [with] a cinematic eye. She excels at setting scenes, conjuring the sensations experienced by the Crafts at each harrowing point. . . . The vivid details help Woo to convey the Crafts’ attention to every element of their plot.” — W. Caleb McDaniel ― The New York Times Book Review

“The Best Strangers in the World: Stories from a Life Spent Listening” by Ari Shapiro — “The book keeps on giving, chapter after chapter, in turns humorous, introspective, or deeply serious, weaving together personal anecdotes, behind-the-scenes secrets, and heartbreaking profiles from war zones and refugee camps. Shapiro says he’s built his radio career on ‘empathy, connection, and listening’— qualities that ring true in his writing as well.” — Booklist (starred review)

ADULT NON-FICTION

“Rare Trees: The Fascinating Stories of the World’s Most Threatened Species” by Sara Oldfield — “A lavishly illustrated, lovingly detailed compendium of “rare trees” of the world…In their noble efforts to honor these “rare” trees, the authors will certainly sensitize readers to the trees’ value and their peril.”―Booklist

PARENTING

“The Read Aloud Factor: How to Create the Habit that Boosts Your Baby’s Brain” by Rehka Rajan — “A must, chock-full of usable ideas and recommended reads and sure to be a favorite for parents of preschoolers.” — Library Journal starred review

EASY READERS

“Alligator” by August Hoeft
“Eyes that Speak to the Stars” by Joanna Ho
“No Nibbling!” by Beth Ferry
“No, Monkey! & Rock Croc” by Katie Dale

PICTURE BOOK

“Eyes that Speak to the Stars” by Joanna Ho
“No Nibbling” by Beth Ferry

JUVENILE FICTION

“Amari and the Night Brothers” by B. B. Alston — “In this thrilling debut, Alston thrusts his intrepid heroine into a setting packed with magic, mythical creatures, and danger. Amari, a Black girl with limited means, confronts privilege and prejudice even while delving into a world of wonder, humor, and adventure, making this a sure-to-please winner.” — Publishers Weekly (starred review)

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Bea Wolf” by Zach Weinersmith — “Weinersmith’s richly evocative turns of phrase run the gamut from hilarious to heart-rending and maintain the flavor of the original without bogging the pace down amid the kennings. Boulet’s illustrations imbue the shenanigans with gleeful energy and a touch of dark absurdity that children, seeing their own fears and triumphs reflected, will delight in.”―Kirkus, starred review

“Dog Man: Twenty Thousand Fleas Under the Sea” by Dav Pilkey — “High-intensity, heartwarming, and, above all, hysterically funny.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Dream to Reality” by Brad Gann — “First Woman tells the tale of Callie Rodriguez, the first woman to explore the Moon. While Callie is a fictional character, the first female astronaut and person of color will soon set foot on the Moon – a historic milestone and part of upcoming NASA missions. Through a series of graphic novels and digital platforms, First Woman aims to capture our attention and unite the next generation of explorers who will return to the Moon.” — Goodreads.com

“Hilo: Gina and the Last City on Earth” by Judd Winick — “I”s Gina the hero the world needs? Gina, D.J., and Hilo are back with an epic time-turning adventure in the New York Times bestselling graphic novel series that kids and critics love!” — Amazon.com

“Mary Anne’s Bad Luck Mystery” by Cynthia Yuan Cheng — “Crisp and spot on.” — Booklist

“The Moth Keeper” by K. O’Neill — “In few words and a style reminiscent of Miyazaki, the Eisner Award-winning O’Neill spins a luminous fantasy about a fox girl, entrusted with protecting her night-village, who wonders what it would be like to live in the light.” —The New York Times

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – FEBRUARY 2023

ADULT FICTION

“All the Dangerous Things” by Stacy Willingham — “Willingham is so relentless in linking Isabelle’s sleeplessness to her deepening sense of waking nightmare that fans can expect some seriously sleepless nights themselves.” ―Kirkus Reviews

“Hell Bent” by Leigh Bardugo — “Bardugo doesn’t flinch from the dark sides of magic and human nature….This portrait of a survivor’s dogged determination to accomplish her goal will appeal to readers of dark academia, urban fantasy, and horror.” ―Booklist (starred review)

“It’s One of Us” by J. T. Ellison — “Betrayal, obsession, and familial ties that bind create a tension-filled story with an intriguing theme. Readers will race through the pages to an end they didn’t see coming.”—Library Journal, STARRED REVIEW

“Looking for Jane” by Heather Marshall — “Marshall makes an absorbing debut with a timely novel about the complexities of pregnancy and motherhood… [a] deftly braided narrative, Marshall keeps the tension high as she reveals the devastating consequences of denying women autonomy over their bodies. A charged topic handled with sensitivity and compassion.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Maureen” by Rachel Joyce — “This slim novella . . . contains a world of emotion . . . The kindness of strangers is Joyce’s theme, as well as forgiveness and grief. No one writes difficult feelings better.”—The Daily Mail

“Someone Else’s Shoes” by Jojo Moyes — “This is a novel about women of a certain age who suddenly find themselves invisible — to their spouses, to their colleagues, to the world — and find pleasure in being “seen” by each other.” —The New York Times

“The Bandit Queens” by Parini Shroff — “In Shroff’s acerbic debut, a woman helps other women escape their abusive marriages in their small village in India, often through murder. . . . Readers are in for a razor-stuffed treat.”—Publishers Weekly

“The Book of Everlasting Things” by Aanchal Malhotra — “A long and luxurious tale of love, loss, memory, and place, told against a backdrop of tumultuous historical events…It will be difficult indeed to forget this exquisite story.” ―Library Journal (starred review)

“The Book Woman’s Daughter” by Kim Michele Richardson — “Fierce, beautiful and inspirational, Kim Michele Richardson has created a powerful tale about brave extraordinary heroines who are downright haunting and unforgettable.” ― Abbott Kahler, New York Times bestselling author (as Karen Abbott) of The Ghosts of Eden Park

“The End of Drum-Time” by Hanna Pylväinen — “With engrossing details of reindeer herding, a beautifully rendered setting and powerful echoes of America’s own dark history of settlers forcing their religion on Indigenous peoples, The End of Drum-Time will leave a lasting impression on all readers of historical fiction.”
BookPage (starred review)

“The House at the End of the World” by Dean Koontz — “Alone on Jacob’s Ladder island until two agents arrive in search of someone–or something–they refuse to identify, artist Katie, along with a brave young girl, finds herself in an epic and terrifying battle with a mysterious enemy that could bring aboutthe end of the world.” — Baker & Taylor

“The Night Travelers” by Armando Lucas Correa — “In The Night Travelers, Armando Lucas Correa returns to the tragedy of Nazi Germany. The Night Travelers depicts the dangers mixed race people faced under the Nuremberg Race Laws of the 1930s, and the fateful voyage of the St Louis liner to Cuba. Based on historical events, Armando has written a tale of love and survival, and the trauma of displacement in a new land as secrets and pain of the past follow new generations. A very good read.” —Maya Lee, co-author of The Nazis Knew My Name

“The Postmistress of Paris” by Meg Waite Clayton — “This gripping historical love story from Clayton brings readers into the courageous lives of those struggling just to stay alive and those risking everything to help.”  — Booklist

“The World and All it Holds” by Aleksandar Hemon — “The World and All That It Holds is a twisting, turning epic rooted in love in all its forms; an odyssey of statelessness; a haunted museum of history ranging from Sarajevo to Shanghai and Jerusalem; and an apothecary of wit, folklore and unexpectable sentences. This life-stuffed novel is Aleksandar Hemon’s masterpiece.” ―DAVID MITCHELL, author of Cloud Atlas

“This Other Eden” by Paul Harding — “A superb achievement…Harding combines an engrossing plot with deft characterizations and alluring language deeply attuned to nature’s artistry. The biblical parallels, which naturally align with the characters’ circumstances, add depth, and enhance the universality of the themes…This gorgeously limned portrait about family bonds, the loss of innocence, the insidious effects of racism, and the innate worthiness of individual lives will resonate long afterward.”
― Sarah Johnson, Booklist (starred review)

“Victory City” by Salman Rushdie — “In its haunting, uncanny, predictive power Victory City shows once again why [Salman Rushdie’s] work will always matter.”The New York Times Book Review (Editors’ Choice)

ADULT MYSTERY

“A Quiet Teacher” by Adam Oyebani — “A teacher trying to hide in the shadows finds himself embroiled in a murder investigation in this compelling and fresh read from a new unique, contemporary voice.” — Atlas Publishing

“Desperation in Death” by J. D. Robb — “The book’s real pleasure lies in watching Eve stride into danger and triumph over evil. That Roarke is happy to support his wife’s desire to go out and kick butt adds to the appeal. Series fans will be delighted.” – Publishers Weekly

“The Cabinet of Dr. Leng” by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child — “As Constance finds her way back to New York City in the late 1800s to prevent the death of her siblings and stop serial killer, Dr. Enoch Leng, FBI Special Agent Pendergast desperately tries to find a way to reunite with her before it’s too late.” — Baker & Taylor

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“And Finally: Matters of Life and Death” by Henry Marsh — “By sharing his findings, And Finally will no doubt prompt others to contemplate their own existence and, more importantly, recognise what is truly worth living for.” — Financial Times

“Spare” by Prince Harry —  “A landmark publication, Spare is full of insight, revelation, self-examination, and hard-won wisdom about the eternal power of love over grief.” — Amazon.com

ADULT NON-FICTION

“America: A Narrative History” by David Emory Shi — “David Shi’s America is the leading narrative history because students love to read it. New to the Eleventh Edition, additional coverage of immigration in American history enhances the timeliness of the narrative and provides students with the historical context to understand today’s immigration debates.” — Inside front cover

“Cobalt Red: How the Blood of the Congo Powers our Lives” by Siddharth Kara — “Meticulously researched and brilliantly written by Siddharth Kara, Cobalt Red documents the frenzied scramble for cobalt and the exploitation of the poorest people in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.”
Baroness Arminka Helic, House of Lords, UK

“Eight Rules of Love: How to Find It, Keep It, and Let It Go” by Jay Shetty — “[A] refreshing look at love as a daily practice…Shetty combines spiritual wisdom and down-to-earth guidance in a surprisingly seamless way, making for lessons that have real staying power. Those looking to start or strengthen relationships will find this well worth a look.” Publisher’s Weekly

“Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life’s Fundamental Bond” by Lydia Denworth — “In addition to examining the scientific underpinnings of friendship, Denworth capably demonstrates how loneliness…is truly a health- and life-threatening condition, and there are things to be done to avoid it. Convincing evidence that evolution endowed us with a need for friends, support, comfort, stimulation, and, ultimately, happiness.”― Kirkus Reviews

“Hands that Speak: Voices from the Upper Valley Dairy Farms” by Maria Clara de Greiff Lara — “Hands that Speak: Voices from the Upper Valley Dairy Farms is a bilingual collection of investigative journalism reports, story-based inquiry, critical essays, and photo documentation about the migrant workers who labor at six dairy farms in the Upper Valley and Franklin County.  The book reveals the ways in which the migrant workers, who are our neighbors and yet who are often distanced by intercultural and linguistic barriers, have sought to build a sense of community.  It also makes visible this essential workforce, with a deeper understanding of the vulnerabilities, inequities, and challenges that they face on a daily basis.” — https://spanport.dartmouth.edu

“Heart to Heart: A Conversation on Love and Hope for our Precious Planet” by His Holiness the Dalai Lama — “Complemented by charming illustrations­­, this book’s uplifting message is clear: while the planet’s forecast may be dire, each individual is able—and obligated—to harness personal power to help save it. This would make a life-affirming gift for people of all ages.” — Publishers Weekly

“Holding the Line: Inside the Nation’s Preeminent US Attorney’s Office and Its Battle with the Trump Justice Department” by Geoffrey Berman — “If Mr. Berman’s account is true, he and others in the department deserve praise for refusing to bow to political pressure. But more important is determining whether there are vulnerabilities in the Justice Department’s structure and procedures that need to be patched…The warning he sounds — about the fragility of justice and the danger that a second Trump presidency might pose — must not go unnoticed.” —The Washington Post

“Home Detox: Make Your Home a Healthier Place for Everyone Who Lives There: Identify and Eleminate Hidden Toxins, Combat Common Health Problems, Clean Away Toxins in Every Room, Make Your Own Cleaning Solutions” by Daniella Chace — “Daniella Chace, a professional toxicologist and health writer, teaches readers how to identify potential toxins in the household, with an easy-to-follow, room-by-room evaluation. She explains the connection between toxins in everyday objects and chronichealth issues, and offers strategies for eliminating toxins, along with easy recipes for effective homemade cleaning solutions”– Baker & Taylor

“How Stella Learned to Talk: The Groundbreaking Story of the World’s First Talking Dog” by Christine Hunger — “[A] fascinating study of the untapped potential in human-dog interaction.”  — Booklist

“Lawns into Meadows: Growing a Regenerative Landscape” by Owen Wormser — “I like the straightforward, can-do approach of Lawns Into Meadows―whether for a replacing a curbside stretch of grass, or an island bed in your backyard, or something bigger.This is a really accessible, how-to book that’s also about sustainability, regeneration, and beauty. I’m so glad to get this book.”–Margaret Roach, A Way to Garden, New York Times contributor

“Molly: The True Story of the Amazing Dog Who Rescues Cats” by Colin Batcher — “Animal ­lovers will devour this British-toned, feel-good book, and might even develop some strategies in case their furry friends go missing.”
Library Journal

“Philosopher of the Heart: The Restless Life of Søren Kierkegaard” by Clare Carlisle — “[Carlisle] judiciously mines Kierkegaard’s works and considerable scholarship to elucidate the philosopher’s life, mind, and struggles . . . A perceptive portrait of an enigmatic thinker.”―Kirkus

“Rough Sleepers” by Tracy Kid — “The powerful story of an inspiring doctor who made a difference, by helping to create a program to care for Boston’s homeless community—by the Pulitzer Prize–winning, New York Times bestselling author of Mountains Beyond Mountains” — Amazon.com

“Tales of Al the Water Rescue Dog: The Making of a Super Athlete” by Lynne Cox — “The moving, inspiring story of Al, the ungainly, unruly, irresistible Newfoundland puppy who grows up to become a daring rescue dog and super athlete—part of Italy’s elite, highly specialized corps of water rescue dogs who swoop out of helicopters and save lives.” — Random House, Inc.

“The Aftermath: The Last Days of the Baby Boom and the Future of the Power in America” by Philip Bum — “[A] highly detailed, data-driven, definitive story of how baby boomers changed America and a little forecasting of what might come next…Bump is a reliable, honest narrator who leans into complexity and refuses simple or singular explanations.” —The Washington Post

“The Bill of Obligations: The Ten Habits of Good Citizens” by Richard Haas — “Americans argue a lot about their rights, but, as Richard Haass reminds us, democracy only works if we also recognize our responsibilities. His newest book reminds us of what those are, providing an indispensable guide to good citizenship in an era of division and rancor.” —Anne Applebaum, author of Twilight of Democracy: The Seductive Lure of Authoritarianism

“The Escape Artist: The Man who Broke out of Auschwitz to Warn the World” by Jonathan Freedland — “Raw and gripping . . . [a] compelling portrait of this neglected hero of Holocaust resistance leaves an inescapable imprint of a past now in danger of being minimized or forgotten. . . . It’s time to honor him for the incredible feat that helped save so many Jewish lives from Nazi extermination.” — Wall Street Journal

“The Good Life: Lessons from the World’s Longest Scientific Study of Happiness” by Robert Waldinger — “Fascinating. . . . Combining intensive research with actionable steps, this penetrating testament to the power of human connection offers gems for almost anyone looking to improve their happiness.” ― Publishers Weekly

“The Home-Scale Forest Garden: How to Plan, Plant, and Tend a Resilient Edible Landscape” by Dani Baker — “Dani Baker is the dreamer and planner behind the Enchanted Edible Forest. She shares experienced, friendly advice for gardeners of all experience levels….With fun stories, a methodical organization, and helpful appendices, this is a great primer full of  gardening expertise.”―Foreword Reviews

“The Small-Scale Poultry Flock: An All-Natural Approach to Raising and Breeding Chickens and Other Fowl for Home and Market Growers” by Harvey Ussery — “Ussery’s outstanding book is certain to withstand the test of time both for its encyclopedic and practical information, and for its acknowledgment that the future of our culture and our food security is in the hands of the small farmer and backyard producer. If you are starting out with your first flock, this is your book. And when you’ve been keeping poultry for 30+ years, this will still be your best book.”--Shannon Hayes, author of Radical Homemakers

“Understanding the Heart: Surprising Insights into the Evolutionary Origins of Heart Disease -and Why it Matters” by Dr. Stephen Hussey — “The most mind-blowing information on heart disease. . . . I consider this to be one of the best books I’ve ever read on cardiovascular health.”―Ben Greenfield, New York Times best-selling author

“Unraveling: What I Learned about Life While Shearing Sheep, Dyeing Wool and Making the Ugliest Sweater” by Peggy Orenstein — “Unraveling is a delight. A meditation on life, and how, if we miss a step (or a stitch), our lives (our sweaters) can unravel at record speed. Funny, moving, and brilliantly written and researched. I will never look at sheep again without a sense of wonder and awe.” — Julianna Margulies

ADULT AUDIO BOOK

“No Plan B” by Lee Child and Andrew Child — “No Plan B is not to be missed. A perfectly plotted, fast-paced thriller, with bigger twists than ever before. It’s no wonder Jack Reacher is everyone’s favorite rebel hero.”—Karin Slaughter

“The Perfect Assassin” by James Patterson & Brian Sitts — “Prof. Brandt Savage—grandson of the legendary action hero—is forced into a top-secret training program where he discovers his true calling…as the perfect assassin.” — Amazon.com

BLUE/DVD MOVIES

“Black Panther: Wakanda Forever”
“Tar”
“The Menu”

PICTURE BOOK

“Caves” by Nell Cross Beckman
“Cozy in Love” by Jan Brett
“Digestion!: The Musical” by Adam Rex
“Endlessly Ever After: Choose Your Way to Endless Fairy Tale Endings!: A Story of Little Red Riding Hood, Jack, Hansel, Gretel, Sleeping Beauty, Snow White, a Wolf, a Witch, a Goose, a Grandmother, Some Pigs, and Endless Variation” by Laurel Snyder
“Farmhouse” by Sophie Blackall
“Gibberish” by Young Vo
“How to Send a Hug” by Hayley Rocco
“Just Ask! Be Different, Be Brave, Be You” by Sonia Sotomayor
“Little Blue Truck Makes a Friend” by Alice Schertle
“Mama and Mommy and Me in the Middle” by Nina Lacour
“Mason Goes Mushrooming” by Melany Kahn
“The Little Blue Cottage” by Kelly Jordan
“The Three Billy Goats Gruff” by Mac Barnett
“The Year We Learned to Fly” by Jacqueline Woodson
“Whose Footprints are These?” by Gerda Muller

JUVENILE FICTION

“Two Degrees” by Alan Gratz — “Gratz plunges his middle schoolers into desperate, life-threatening straits in three wildly dangerous scenarios… delivered with wrenching, dramatic urgency.” — Kirkus Reviews

“Tumble” by Celia C. Perez — “Tumble is a complex, emotional story about loss, self-discovery and belonging, about forgetting who you were and remembering who you are.” —BookPage, starred review

JUVENILE NON-FICTION

“Action!: How Movies Began” by Meghan McCarthy — “Movie history deserves no less than this stunning encapsulation, cleverly designed and gorgeously rendered. ― Kirkus Reviews

“Blue: A History of the Colors as Deep as the Sea and as Wide as the Sky” by Nana Ekua Brew-Hammond — “Brew-Hammond’s graceful prose and fluid organization, coupled with Minter’s emotive illustrations, set synapses firing.” —The Bulletin, starred review

“The Universe in You: A Microscopic Journey” by Jason Chin — “Giving the biggest impact to these tiniest bits are full-page watercolor-and-gouache illustrations in fine detail, with an illustrator’s note explaining methods for depicting and coloring particles too minuscule for humans to visualize. . . . stunning visuals. . . .”—Booklist, Starred Review

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – JANUARY 2023

ADULT FICTION

“Great Circle” by Maggie Shipstead — “Transcendent . . . A rolling, roiling epic . . . Through the interwoven stories of impetuous flyer Marian Graves and flavor-of-the-month actress Hadley Baxter, Shipstead ponders the motivating forces behind acts of daring defiance, self-fulfillment and self-destruction. An ambitious, soaring saga—[Shipstead] takes her characters to dizzying heights, drawing readers into lives of courage and mystery.”
Booklist

“In Love’s Time” by Kate Breslin — “MI6 agent Marcus Weatherford lives by the principle of duty before love, but with WWI nearing its end, he hopes to finally fulfill his promise of forever to Clare Danner …. Set in 1918 in England, In Love’s Time features the tender rediscovery of love amidst the high-stakes danger of wartime espionage tied to the Russian Empire in WWI. Clare embodies emotional vulnerability, resilience, and faith in the face of the unknown. Readers will be thrilled by the race-against-the-clock conclusion and the palpable passion between Marcus and Clare that is simmering below the surface.” — Kate Campos, AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2022.

“The Lies I Tell” by Julie Clark — “Intriguing…Clark skillfully fleshes out the strong, multifaceted characters. The story nicely mixes brisk plot points with slow burning reveals as it builds to a satisfying conclusion. Clark doesn’t disappoint.” ― Publishers Weekly

“The Mother-in-Law” by Sally Hepworth — “A deliciously entertaining novel about one woman’s complicated relationship with her mother-in-law that ends in death. This one is perfect for fans of Big Little Lies.” ―Good Morning America

ADULT MYSTERY

“Bloody Soil” by S. Lee Manning — “…the action rarely lets up…riveting, energetic…with lead characters worth rooting for.”-Kirkus Reviews

“The Department of Rare Books and Special Collections” by Eva Jurczyk — “Who doesn’t love a mystery involving rare books and bad librarians? This clever, deftly written story has all that and more. A great pleasure from beginning to end.” ― Karen Joy Fowler, New York Times bestselling author

“The Rising Tide” by Ann Cleeves — “A friend of mine once joked that the work of Ann Cleeves is the closest the crime-fiction genre comes to evoking ASMR ― the euphoric, pleasant, spine-tingling sensation that’s all the rage on YouTube. The books never get too dark, never venture too far into dangerous territory, but aren’t outright cozy, either…. This is the work of a pro ― a diverting, solidly crafted mystery that’s guaranteed to entertain.”―New York Times Book Review

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“The Revolutionary Samuel Adams” by Stacy Schiff — “This enthralling biography is a persuasive exercise in rehabilitation. Through stylish prose and a close reading of Adams’s career as a canny propagandist, Schiff suggests that he may have done more than any other founder to prime colonists for armed rebellion and deserves to be better known.”―Gregory Cowles, New York Times, Editors’ Choice

ADULT NON-FICTION

“American Midnight: The Great War, a Violent Peace, and Democracy’s Forgotten Crisis” by Adam Hochschild — “A sweeping look at the years between World War I and the Roaring Twenties, when conscientious objectors to the war were maltreated and conflicts over race and labor were at a high pitch. Hochschild draws direct lines between events of that time and the unrest of today.” — New York Times, 15 Works of Nonfiction to Read This Fall

“Breathe In Breathe Out: Restore Your Health, Reset Your Mind and Find Happiness Through Breathwork” by Stuart Sandeman — “[The exercises] offer a variety of ways to try breathwork… [Breathe In, Breathe Out] gets the job done.” –Publishers Weekly

Solar Power for Beginners, 2 in 1 bundle: A DIY Guide to Solar Energy, Designing and Installing Grid-tied, Hybrid, and Off-grid Solar Systems for Your House, RV, Camper Van, Boar, Cabin and Tiny Home” by DIY Source — “Are you willing to cut your electricity bill in half by adding a solar setup to your house?
If yes, then this 2 in 1 solar power DIY bundle book is written for you!” — Amazon

“The Myth of Normal: Trauma, Illness & Healing in a Toxic Culture” by Gabor Mate — “In The Myth of Normal, Gabor Maté takes us on an epic journey of discovery about how our emotional well-being, and our social connectivity (in short: how we live), is intimately intertwined with health, disease and addictions. Chronic mental and physical illnesses may not be separate and distinct diseases, but intricate, multilayered processes that reflect (mal)adaptations to the cultural context that we live in, and the values we live by. This riveting and beautifully written tale has profound implications for all of our lives, including the practice of medicine and mental health.”–Bessel A. van der Kolk MD, President, Trauma Research Foundation, Professor of psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine, #1 New York Times Bestseller: The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind and Body in the Healing of Trauma

“The Progress Illusion: Reclaiming our Future from the Fairytale of Economics” by Jon D. Erickson — “Erickson’s powerful new book shows how flawed economic thinking has shaped not only our economy but also our society and politics. The story is both deeply disturbing and hopeful, as Erickson describes an emerging brand of economics that shifts focus from GDP to well-being. Highly recommended.” — James Gustave Speth, former Dean, Yale School of the Environment; author of “America the Possible: Manifesto for a New Economy”

“The Woodchip Handbook: A Complete Guide for Farmers, Gardeners and Landscapers” by Ben Raskin — “Ben Raskin’s wide-ranging work in varied locations makes The Woodchip Handbook a really useful overview of the possibilities afforded by woodchip. It’s good for soil and good for plants, once you understand how it can work best for you, as he explains in this book.”―Charles Dowding, author of Charles Dowding’s No Dig Gardening

“Why Fish Don’t Exist: A Story of Loss, Love, and the Hidden Order of Life” by Lulu Miller — “Riveting. Surprising. Shocking, even! Why Fish Don’t Exist begins with a mesmerizing account of the life of distinguished biologist David Starr Jordan—and then, quite unexpectedly, turns into so much more. Narrated in Lulu Miller’s intimate, quirky voice, this is a story of science and struggle, of heartbreak and chaos. This book will capture your heart, seize your imagination, smash your preconceptions, and rock your world.” — Sy Montgomery, New York Times bestselling author of The Soul of an Octopus

PARENTING

“Sewing Quiet Books for Children: Easy to Make, Easy to Customize: 18 Step-by-Step Page Projects with Patterns” by Lily Zunic — “…Zunic shows how to construct two different types of cloth books–one for babies and one for toddlers–that will spark a sense of textile learning that can’t be matched by technology. Information on materials and basic techniques prefaces the project instructions, which feature how-to information on fabrics, zipper sewing, and pattern transfer as well as hands-on, step-by-step instructions for fabricating either a sewn-spine or ring-bound activity book. … Includes 14 full-size templates.” — Barbara Jacobs. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2022.

“The Sears Baby Book: Everything You Need to Know about Your Baby from Birth to Age Two” by William Sears, M.D. — “The million-copy bestseller by “the man who remade motherhood” (TIME) has now been revised, expanded, and bought thoroughly up-to-date — with the latest information on prenatal vitamins, breastfeeding practices, daycare, midwifery, hospital births, preventing and overcoming postpartum depression, and infant development.” — Amazon.com

BOARD BOOK

“Poppy’s Feelings”
“Poppy’s Shape Search”
“Where’s Poppy”

PICTURE BOOK

“After the Snowfall” by Rich Lo
“I am Human: A Book of Empathy” by Susan Verde

JUVENILE BIOGRAPHY

“Sanctuary: Kip Tiernan and Rosie’s Place, the Nation’s First Shelter” by Christine McDonnell — “Author Christine McDonnell, who has taught English to immigrants at Rosie’s Place, adeptly conveys the narrative arc of Tiernan’s life. . . . Victoria Tentler-Krylov’s atmospheric illustrations draw readers into Tiernan’s surroundings with immediacy and emotion. . . . This thoughtful book conveys a powerful, important message: ‘When you listen to others, you show respect; you learn who they are and what they need.'” —BookPage (starred review)

JUVENILE FICTION

“The Door of No Return” by Kwame Alexander — “Interweaving moments of joyful exuberance and heartbreaking sadness via sensate lines by turns sweet and stinging, Alexander’s sweeping novel conjures a captivating, resonant world of African tradition, life, and ancestral wisdom.”―Publishers Weekly, starred review

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Claire and the Dragons” by Wander Atunes — “Claire and the Dragons is a female-centric fantasy adventure comic book series set in a Dark Ages-like world written and illustrated by Brazilian creator Wander Antunes and published by Scout Comics’ all-ages imprint Scoot. — Amazon.com

“Extraordinary” A Story of an Ordinary Princess” by Cassie Anderson — “While her sisters were blessed at birth with exceptional skills, Princess Basil’s “gift” is to be ordinary. But can a princess be ordinary? Inspired by M. M. Kaye’s beloved novel!” — Amazon.com

“Fish Girl” by David Wiesner and Donna Jo Napoli — “The triple Caldecott winner David Wiesner brings his rich visual imagination and trademark artistry to the graphic novel format in a unique coming-of-age tale that begins underwater. A young mermaid, called Fish Girl, in a boardwalk aquarium has a chance encounter with an ordinary girl. Their growing friendship inspires Fish Girl’s longing for freedom, independence, and a life beyond the aquarium tank. Sparkling with humor and brilliantly visualized, Fish Girl’s story will resonate with every young person facing the challenges and rewards of growing up.” — Onix Annotations,

YOUNG ADULT FICTION

“Big Boned” by Jo Watson — “Big Boned is an optimistic novel whose warm cast subverts convention, and whose heroine learns to take risks.” ―Foreword

“I was Born for This” by Alice Oseman — “A funny, wise, and heartbreakingly true coming of age novel. I Was Born for This is a stunning reflection of modern teenage life, and the power of believing in something — especially yourself.” — Amazon.com

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

“Unfamiliar” by Haley Newsome — “Based on the wildly popular webcomic from Tapas, Unfamiliar is an endearing and whimsical story full of magical mayhem, offbeat outsiders, and the power of friendships and found family. …” Onix Annotations

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – NOVEMBER 2022

ADULT FICTION

“Hester” by Laurie Lico Albanese — “”This thoughtfully researched tale shines a light on the barriers faced by 19th-century women who did not conform.” ––Washington Post

“Secluded Cabin Sleeps Six” by Lisa Unger — “Embedded in a riveting novel of suspense is a revealing examination of the dangers inherent in public DNA sharing…[Lisa Unger] is in good form here, in her twentieth outing, and her fans will be eager to dive right in.” —Booklist

“The Inn at Tansy Falls” by Cate Woods — “A heartfelt contemporary about life, loss, and love that will utterly charm and delight readers and leave them clamoring for a follow-up.”―Booklist, Starred Review

“The Last Chairlift” by John Irving — “Here the consistent pleasure is an extended family whose distinctive voices deliver thoughtful messages of tolerance, understanding, and affection for those who are different.”—KIRKUS REVIEWS

“The Passenger” by Cormac McCarthy — “A rich story of an underachieving salvage diver in 1980 New Orleans… This thriller narrative is intertwined with the story of Western’s sister, Alicia… He dazzles with his descriptions of a beautifully broken New Orleans… The book’s many pleasures will leave readers aching for the final installment.”  —Publishers Weekly

“The Perfect Assassin” by James Patterson — “Grandson of action hero Doc Savage, nerdy professor Brandt Savage is pressed into a top-secret training program that re-creates him mentally and physically as The Perfect Assassin…” — LIBRARY JOURNAL, c2022.

ADULT MYSTERY

“The Butcher and the Wren” by Alaina Urquhart — ‘Urquhart has crafted a thriller that is necessarily graphic but not exploitative. The crisp detail, the narrative brevity and the blade-sharp connections between the pathologist and the killer all bode well for future installments.” —Sarah Weinman, New York Times

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“A Place Called Home” by David Ambroz — “[A] captivating debut…Galvanizing and compassionate, this personal account of survival should be required reading.”―Publishers Weekly

“Being Heumann: An Unrepentant Memoir of Disability Rights Activist” by Judith Heumann with Kristen Joiner — “Consider this book an inspiring call for inclusiveness, courage, equity, and justice as well as a reminder of people’s power to change the world for the better.” —Booklist

“Dying of Politeness” by Geena Davis — “Academy Award winner Davis makes an engaging literary debut with a candid, appealing memoir recounting her evolution from self-effacing young woman to feisty activist … An entertaining and ebullient memoir.” — Kirkus Reviews

“Invisible Storm: A Soldier’s Memoir of Politics and PTSD” by Jason Kander– “Kander displays a level of vulnerability not often seen in political memoirs, offering a bracing portrait of untreated PTSD and an insightful psychological profile of political ambition. Readers will appreciate the candor of this harrowing tale.” — Publishers Weekly

“Path Lit by Lightning: A Life by Jim Thorpe” by David Maraniss — “In the new biography Path Lit by Lightning, David Maraniss details the enormous odds that a Native American hero had to overcome. . . . He insists that taken as a whole, Jim Thorpe’s story is not one of prejudice, nor the hypocrisy of others. . . . [And] emphasizes that whatever life took from him, Thorpe persisted and trained and worked and learned and succeeded.” — Keith Olbermann ― The New York Times Book Review

“Somewhere Sisters: A Story of Adoption, Identity, and the Meaning of Family” by Erika Hayaskaki — “Hayasaki explores the many dimensions of transracial and transnational adoption in this moving account of families torn apart.”  ―The Cut

“Stay True” by Hua Hsu — “A moving portrait of friends, death, doubt, and everything in between. . . Hsu writes with tenderness but scorching precision. . . Genuinely one of the most moving portraits of friendship to have come out in recent years.” —The Nation

“Uncertain Fruit: A Memoir of Infertility, Loss and Love” by Rebecca and Sallyann Majoya — “A candid, unflinching look at a couple’s struggle to have a child of their own…By taking turns telling their story, moving back and forth in time and place, they have produced a skillfully woven narrative.” — Linda Peavy, poet and co-author of Frontier House

ADULT NON-FICTION

“A Girlhood: Letter to my Transgender Daughter” by Carolyn Hayes — “Hays here presents a different view of God—as a being of pure love that would never consider her daughter a mistake, but instead, a gift.”—Oprah Daily

“Art of Knitting Hats: 30 Easy-to-Follow Patterns to Create Your Own Colorwork Masterpiece” by Courtney Flynn — “This is a knitter’s dream introduction to colorwork! The designs in this book are whimsical, fun and sure to keep any knitter engaged from start to finish.” – Tif Neilan, creator of Tif Handknits

“Best Bike Rides in New England: Backroad Routes for Cycling the Northeast States” by David Sobel — “The Northeast provides some of the most exciting cycling in the United States: sweeping vistas, seaside towns, fall colors, and more. With this comprehensive guide, New Hampshire local David Sobel offers up rides in Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Maine.” — Amazon.com

“Ejaculate Responsibly: A Whole New Way to Think About Abortion” by Gabrielle Stanley Blair

“Forever Home: How We Turned our House Into a Haven for Abandoned, Abused and Misunderstood Dogs and Each Other” by Ron Danta — “… unforgettable, gut-wrenching story of how authors Robertshaw and Danta opened their hearts, homes, lives, and wallets to rescue over 13,000 dogs…. These two angels disguised as humans offer so much hope and love for animals—and invaluable lessons for readers.” — Booklist (starred review)

“Glucose Revolution: The Life Changing Power of Balancing Your Blood Sugar” by Jessie Inchauspe — “I hugely enjoyed reading this book; Jessie offers a detailed understanding of the problem which faces so many of us – how to balance our blood sugar levels – along with simple and accessible science-based hacks which really could help you transform your health.” —MICHAEL MOSLEY, M.D.,  #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Fast Diet

“No Choice: The Destruction of Roe V. Wade and the Fight to Protect a Fundamental American Right” by Becca Andrews — “Necessary in its racial and gender inclusivity, this thoughtful book will appeal to anyone looking to understand the way forward in a post-Roe world…An important book on a timely topic.”―Kirkus

“Playing God in the Meadow: How I Learned to Admire My Weeds” by Martha Leb Molnar — “A thoughtful tale of making a meadow, from a gardener who is not afraid to struggle with questions botanical and environmental.”―Sydney Landon Plum, author of Solitary Goose

“Smitten Kitchen Keepers: New Classics for Your Forever Files” by Deb Perelman — “Smitten Kitchen is not just a food blog: it is the food blog.” —The New Yorker

“Space Craze: America’s Enduring Fascination with Real and Imagined Spaceflight” by Margaret A. Weitekamp — “Weitekamp has produced an important book on the first great pillar of space travel: science fiction and the power of imagination. In a readable yet detailed manner, Weitekamp cleverly employs museum artifacts to reveal the ways objects capture elements of national identity and confirms once again that modern space travel is as much about the past as about the future.”—Howard McCurdy, author of Space and the American Imagination

“The Complete Modern Pantry: 350+ Ways to Cook Well with What’s on Hand” — “Flexibility is at the core of pantry cooking—when every cook needs to improvise. This unique guidehelps you get the most out of your own pantry by showing how ingredients add crunch, acid, umami, or spice to a dish.” — Amazon.com

“The Extraordinary Life of an Ordinary” by Paul Newman — “Raw reflections from a movie icon…a revealing memoir of a life marked by pain, grief, and regret…Intimate reflections on an extraordinary life steeped in sadness.” —Kirkus Reviews

“The Sleep Prescription: Seven Days to Unlocking Your Best Rest” by Aric A. Prather, PhD — “The Sleep Prescription is a practical guide to improving your sleep and enhancing your life. Prather offers a set of transfor­mative and doable changes in sleep habits that can make you healthier, happier, and more productive.” —Tom Boyce, MD, author of The Orchid and the Dandelion

“Wind Trees” by John Freeman — “With this collection, Freeman compels us to feel, in turns of turbulence and stillness, the longing and rage and wonder that visit anyone keenly and tenderly paying attention to the passage of human life in an uncertain landscape and time. Freeman’s poems become all at once like eulogy, like instruction, like acts of love.” —Pitchaya Sudbanthad

PICTURE BOOK

“Berry Song” by Michaela Goade
“Keepunumuk: Weeachumun’s Thanksgiving Story” by Danielle Greendeer, Anthony Perry and Alexis Bunt
“Kimchi, Kimchi Every Day” by Erica Kim
“More than Peach” by Bellen Woodard

JUVENILE BIOGRAPHY

“Finding My Dance” by Ria Thundercloud — “A moving picture book about the resilience one can find in one’s cultural inheritance.” —Kirkus Reviews

“The Eagle Huntress: The True Story of the Girl who Soared Beyond Expectations” by Aisholpan Nurgaiv with Liz Welsh — “Nurgaiv’s love for and pride in her homeland, culture, and family come through with quiet, persuasive power. An intriguing memoir from a girl who’s become a cultural icon.”―Kirkus

“The Vast Wonder of the World” by Melina Mangal — “Ernest Everett Just was not like other scientists of his time. He saw the whole, where others saw only parts. He noticed details others failed to see. He persisted in his research despite the discrimination and limitations imposed on him as an African American. …” —ONIX Annotations

JUVENILE FICTION

“Hear Me” by Kerry O’Malley Cerra — “Asterisks replace unheard words of dialogue in this moving middle grade novel, based on the author’s own life, that follows an adolescent girl’s struggle with both progressive hearing loss and her parents’ insistence that she get cochlear implants.”―The New York Times Book Review

YOUNG ADULT FICTION

“A Girl’s Guide to Love & Magic” by Debbie Rigaud — “Rigaud explores many elements of Haitian and Afro-Caribbean culture thoughtfully and with an admirable vulnerability as Cicely adventures down Eastern Parkway navigating stigma and magic, devils and allies, family legacies and shame en route to a rich, magical sort of self-discovery. Steeped in the magic of first kisses, family bonds, and joyful community.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“How Moon Fuentez Fell in Love with the Universe”by Raquel Vasquez Gilliland — “Amazingly realistic, this book is the coming-of-age story that teens need, wrapped in a gorgeously poetic package” — Booklist starred review

“Lakelore” by Anna-Maria McLemore — “An astonishingly beautiful love letter to neurodivergent and nonbinary teens cast amid a magical lake setting that will pull you in right along with the characters.” ―Booklist, starred review

“List of Ten” by Halli Gomez — “Told in the first person, this powerful novel takes readers into the emotional and physical depths of TS, feeling every pain and twitch. . . .This #OwnVoices novel gives insight into living with these conditions, and readers will ponder how friendship means more than being “perfect.”—School Library Journal

“Love from A to Z” by S. K. Ali — “In Love from A to Z, S.K. Ali once again takes an unflinching and moving look at the intricacies of life as a Muslim teen in an imperfect, multi-cultural world. Beautiful.” ― Shelf Awareness, starred review

“Meet Me in Mumbai” by Sabina Kahn — “Thought-provoking . . . compassionate . . . hopeful.” – Publishers Weekly

“Patron Saints of Nothing” by Randy Ribay — “Passionately and fearlessly, Ribay delves into matters of justice, grief, and identity.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

“The Life and Crimes of Hoodie Rosen” by Isaac Blum — “A sharply written coming-of-age story whose protagonist, like any teen, is figuring out where he fits in, under circumstances that are thought-provoking and at times heart-wrenching.” –Horn Book Magazine, *STARRED REVIEW*

“The Words in my Hands” by Asphyxia — “Part coming of age, part call to action, this fast-paced #ownvoices novel about a Deaf teenager is a unique and inspiring exploration of what it means to belong.” — Amazon.com

“TJ Powar has Something to Prove” by Jesmeen Kaur Deo — “In [a] poignant debut…Deo delivers a refreshing take on the familiar self-love narrative, portraying characters across the Indian diaspora whose determination to be themselves, irrespective of Western cultural perspectives, drives home the idea that the perception of oneself through a singular lens is often incomplete.”–Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Where Angels Pass” by Ellen Gable — “Ellen Gable tells a very personal and difficult story, Where Angels Pass, with such gentleness, love, and heartfelt honesty. What I expected to be an uncomfortable story ended up being a love story of a daughter for her father, a father who suffered the lifelong effects of something no young person should ever experience. Thank you, Ellen, for sharing this deeply moving story that will surely touch readers in a very profound way.” — Jim Sano, author, The Father’s Son

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – FEBRUARY 2022

ADULT FICTION

“Christmas at the Restaurant” by Pamela Kelley — “Nantucket’s famous Christmas Stroll is always the first weekend of December and this year sisters Mandy and Emma, and Paul, the executive chef, want to do something extra special for Mimi’s Place, the restaurant they co-own. It will be Emma and Paul’s first Christmas together as a couple and Mandy’s first holiday as a newly single and divorced mother of two. Although Mandy does have a promising new relationship, she wants to take things very slow. Their sister Jill and her new husband, Billy, are planning to spend the whole month of December on Nantucket too, juggling working remotely for the executive search firm they own together in Manhattan and relaxing and spending time with family and helping out at the restaurant too. And Gina, one of their best servers and bartender, is spending her first winter on Nantucket and it’s a bit of an adjustment. Winters on Nantucket are so much quieter than the city life she was used to. She’s even more confused when someone she had a major crush on back in the city moves to Nantucket. Suddenly her boring winter is starting to look a lot more interesting.” — Amazon.com

“Fifty Words for Rain” by Asha Lemmie — Daughter of a married Japanese aristocrat and her African American GI lover, Nori struggles to seek acceptance in post-World War II Japan, even as she is hidden away in the attic of her grandparents’ imperial estate and forced to take chemical baths to lighten her skin. The arrival of her half-brother provides her with an unexpected ally. In-house excitement over this debut.” — LIBRARY JOURNAL, c2020.

“Mistress of the Ritz” by Melanie Benjamin — “This impeccably researched, lyrically told historical about a brash American woman and her French husband during WWII is a remarkable achievement. . . . Benjamin skillfully weaves in a host of historical figures—including Coco Chanel, alleged to be a Nazi sympathizer, and Ernest Hemingway—whose vibrant presences make Benjamin’s protagonists and engaging group of supporting characters shine all the more. Even readers who aren’t big fans of historical fiction might be swayed by this outstanding tale.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“The Hotel” by Pamela Kelley — “The Whitley was Nantucket’s most exclusive hotel. …If you worked in the hospitality industry, landing a job at The Whitley was the ultimate goal. Many of the staff had lived and worked there for years. There were strict rules about the staff keeping their distance from both the guests and the family. But sometimes, rules were broken. No one is more surprised than Paula Whitley when her grandfather, Wynn Whitley, the founder of the hotel and many other business holdings, makes two big announcements. He is promoting Paula from her quiet behind the scenes role handling the accounting, to being in charge of everything. The rest of the family, siblings, cousins, aunts, uncles and parents, are stunned and not everyone is happy about it. And the second big announcement–she’s expected to work closely with a newly-hired consultant, a turnaround expert in luxury hotels. Paula dislikes David Connolly immediately. He’s arrogant and bossy and annoyingly right most of the time. She’d be loving her new role, if it wasn’t for him. And everyone, family and staff are wondering–what is grandfather’s goal? Is he looking to sell The Whitley?” — Baker & Taylor

“The Maid” by Nita Prose — “Prose threads a steady needle with the intricate plotting, the locked-room elements of the mystery, and especially Molly’s character. . . . The reader comes to understand Molly’s worldview, and to sympathize with her longing to be accepted—a quest that gives The Maid real emotional heft.”—The New York Times Book Review

The Restaurant” by Pamela Kelley — “Three sisters. An inherited Nantucket restaurant. One year before they can sell.Mandy, Emma and Jill are as close as three sisters who live hundreds of miles apart can be…. When their beloved grandmother, Rose Ferguson passes peacefully in her sleep a week before her ninety-ninth birthday she leaves them quite a surprise. In addition to her Nantucket home, they learned that she was the silent owner of Mimi’s Place, one of Nantucket’s most popular year-round restaurants. There is of course, a catch–she left the restaurant equally to Mandy, Emma, and Jill–and also to Paul, the chef for the past twelve years.And before they can sell, all three girls need to work at the restaurant for a period of one year–or else their shares will go to Paul–who was also Emma’s first love. Three sisters inherit a Nantucket restaurant and must work together for a year–or lose their shares to the chef. Paul was Emma’s first love, and now he’s their business partner.” — Amazon.com

“The Trees” by Percival Everett — “Everett has mastered the movement between unspeakable terror and knockout comedy.” ―The New York Times Book Review

“The Violin Conspiracy” by Brendan Slocumb — “[A] gripping debut. . . . Slocumb sensitively portrays Ray’s resilience in the face of extreme racism. The author is off to a promising start.” — Publishers Weekly

“To Paradise” by Hanya Yanagihara — “We are given a patriarch, wealth, children; there is an arranged marriage, an inheritance, a true love, a class divide and a significant twist. Deftly paced and judiciously detailed, the tale makes hay with the conventions of the 19th-century novel. But that’s not all. With breathtaking audacity Yanagihara rewrites America….Yanagihara masterfully repurposes themes, situations and motifs…This ambitious novel tackles major American questions and answers them in an original, engrossing way. It has a major feel. But it is finally in [its] minor moments that Yanagihara shows greatness.” – Gish Jen, The New York Times Book Review(cover review)

“Violeta” by Isabel Allende — “Another gift of epic storytelling . . . A Long Petal of the Sea is a love story for these times.” —NPR

ADULT NON-FICTION

“Bee People and the Bugs They Love” by Frank Mortimer — “…it is an achievement to convey so much knowledge so accessibly without once seeming overbearing. The main reason it all works is the honest descriptions of friendships that spring up around a shared, all-absorbing interest in bees.  And Mortimer intersperses useful facts about his passion in a successful and funny book that is sure to swell the ranks of the world’s beekeepers.” –New York Times

“Greek Myths: A New Retelling” by Charlotte Higgins — “Chief culture writer at the Guardian and winner of the Classical Association Prize, Higgins takes a fresh look at Greek myths, retold throughout the millennia given their unerring understanding of the human condition. Higgins works from the perspective of women, from goddesses to witches to wives, mothers, and daughters, as if they were weaving these stories together into one grand tapestry. Illustrator Ofili has exhibited at the Tate Britain and New York’s New Museum. Big in-house love.” — Barbara Hoffert. LIBRARY JOURNAL, c2021.

“The Monastic Heart: 50 Simple Practices for a Contemplative and Fulfilling Life” by Joan Chittister — “[An] impeccable guide . . . Filled with many suggestions for ways to forge greater connections with one’s community and God’s will, Chittister’s program will serve as a powerful corrective to those looking to slow down.” —Publishers Weekly

“Unsettling Truths: The Ongoing, Dehumanizing Legacy of the Doctrine of Discovery” by Mark Charles — “This sobering critique presents a disturbing yet welcome analysis of how the Doctrine of Discovery has split American church and society along racial lines, and makes a powerful argument for engaging in national dialogue around issues of class, gender, and race.” — Publishers Weekly, October 14, 2019

“Woke Racism: How a New Religion Has Betrayed Black America” by John McWhorter — “Honest commentary about racial controversies is rare, and John McWhorter is a writer who can be counted on to provide it. Woke Racism is a heartfelt evisceration of the sloppy thinking that forms the foundation of so much social justice activism today. It’s an essential contribution to our national discussion about racial inequality, and McWhorter’s willingness to put unvarnished truth above politically correct niceties deserves our gratitude.”—Jason L. Riley, Wall Street Journal columnist and author of “Maverick”

JUVENILE FICTION

“Bird” by Zetta Elliott — “Bird, an artistic young African-American boy, expresses himself through drawing as he struggles to understand his older brother’s drug addiction and death, while a family friend, Uncle Son, provides guidance and understanding.” — Atlas Publishing

JUVENILE MOVIES

“Encanto”