Categories
Highlighted New Arrivals

Heartstopper: Vol 1 by Alice Osman

“The conversational tone will leave readers feeling like they are sitting with an insightful friend . . . This young adult memoir is a contemporary hallmark of the blossoming genre. Johnson anchors the text with encouragement and realistic guidance for queer Black youth.” ―School Library Journal

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – MAY 2022

ADULT FICTION

“Harmony Hill” by John S. Hall — “In 1941, sixteen-year-old Jubilant Brown is struggling to keep his family’s small dairy farm from going under. …Farming in Vermont is a hardscrabble existence requiring muscle and ingenuity, something Jubal is learning as he comes of age. He also faces the ins and outs of love as he navigates friendships with three very different, strong young women. …. Harmony Hill is an old-fashioned yarn about small-town life. Hayesville will capture your heart with its quirky characters who are much like the neighbors you’ve always known. And when the town is rocked by a terrible tragedy, it reveals the true colors of the townsfolk and their interwoven connections.” — Amazon.com

“House of Earth and Blood” by Sarah J. Maas — “A richly imagined tale spiced with snarky humor and smoldering romance.” ―Publishers Weekly

“The Liar’s Dictionary” by Eley Williams — “An audacious, idiosyncratic dual love story about how language and people intersect and connect, and about how far we’ll go to save what we’re passionate about…Showcases a delight in language that evokes both Nabokov and—more on point with its mix of playfulness, profundity, warmth, and heart—Ali Smith.” —NPR

ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“From Hollywood with Love: The Rise and Fall (And Rise Again) of the Romantic Comedy” by Scott Meslow — “Meslow tells lots of engaging making of stories (for example, how Pretty Woman was transformed from a fallen-woman tragedy into a Disney fairy tale), but it’s his overarching theme, that romantic comedies are much more than lovey-dovey fluff, that really holds our interest.” — Booklist

“The Library: A Fragile History” by Andrew Pettegrew — “This sweeping history of libraries is outstanding…. A history of libraries from the ancient world to yesterday, it is fetchingly produced and scrupulously researched — a perfect gift for bibliophiles everywhere.”―Sunday Times

PARENTING

“The Addiction Inoculation: Raising Healthy Kids in a Culture of Dependence” by Jessica Lahey — “Lahey compassionately lays out the societal pressures that can result in toxic stress and aggressive behavior. . . . Foundational advice to steer young adults away from the urges and temptations that lead to substance abuse.” — Kirkus Reviews

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Shadow of the Bird” by Tim Porbert — “In the second installment of the award-winning, critically acclaimed Lightfall series, Bea and Cad continue their quest to stop Kest, the mythic bird who stole the sun. Perfect for middle grade fans of Amulet and Avatar the Last Airbender, Lightfall: Shadow of the Bird is another breathtaking journey into the magical world of Irpa, where epic battles and powerful creatures abound.” — Publisher’s Annotation

“Wings of Fire: The Brightest Night” by Tui Sutherland — “Sunny has always taken the Dragonet Prophecy very seriously, so Morrowseer’s devastating news changes everything–now she must forge a new identity, and find a way to stop the futile and destructive war between the dragon clans.” — Atlas Publishing

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

“A Quick & Easy Guide to Sex & Disability” by A. Andrews — “A great introduction to basic information many disabled people can use. With humor, real talk, and lovely illustrations featuring all kinds of bodies, this guide can help disabled people (and their partners) on their journey toward self-love, better communication, and confidence.” — Alice Wong, Founder and Director, Disability Visibility Project

YOUNG LOCAL AUTHORS

“I See a Der and a Fox” by Maddison

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – APRIL 2022

ADULT FICTION

“A Rogue’s Company” by Allison Montclair — “A saucy and witty romp…with an ear for characters’ unique lingo and language and an eye for period detail, Montclair’s Rogue is spot on.” —Historical Novel Society

“Early Morning Riser” by Katherine Heiny — “This touching and fizzy comic novel… makes the ordinary extraordinary. A deep awareness of the ways the potential for tragedy lies just beneath the surface of small-town life gives the proceedings a sense of gravity and holds the humor in perfect balance. This is a winner.”—Publishers Weekly, starred

“The Disappearing Act” by Catherine Steadman — “From the New York Times bestselling author of Something in the Water and Mr. Nobody comes “an unputdownable mystery about the nightmares that abound in the pursuit of Hollywood dreams” — (Caroline Kepnes, author of the You series). — Random House, Inc.

“The Indigo Girl” by Natasha Boyd — “Set on South Carolina’s plantations beginning in 1739, this excellent historical novel by Boyd (Eversea) is based on the true story of Eliza Lucas Pinckney (1722-1793). Sixteen-year-old Eliza Lucas is charged with running her father’s three heavily-mortgaged plantations while he pursues a military career in the Caribbean. …Kindhearted Eliza is independent and forward-thinking. She defies the Negro Act of 1740 and teaches her slaves to read, seeks their advice, and banishes the lash. …Add threats of war with Spain and the strict social and cultural codes for Southern women, and Boyd has crafted a captivating novel of Southern colonial history.” — PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, c2017.

“The Midnight Bargain” by C. L. Polk — “The author’s penetrating social critique and deeply felt depiction of one woman’s struggle for self-determination are balanced by her charming take on classic Regency romance…. An expertly concocted mélange of sweet romance and sharp social commentary.” —Kirkus (starred review)

“The School for Good Mothers” by Jessamine Chan –“Jessamine Chan’s infuriatingly timely debut novel, The School for Good Mothers, takes this widely accepted armchair quarterbacking of motherhood and ratchets it up to the level of a surveillance state — one that may read more like a preview than a dystopia, depending on your faith in the future of Roe v. Wade…chilling…clever.” —THE NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW

“West with Giraffes” by Lynda Rutledge — “[A] larger-than-life story about the power of both animal magnetism and human connection…witty, charming, and heartwarming.” ―Booklist

“While Justice Sleeps” by Stacey Adams –“A political-legal thriller that should hold the reader rapt from its opening line . . . to the extraordinary climactic courtroom scene that turns the plot upside down with ironic flair and utter conviction.”—Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

ADULT MYSTERY

“A Line to Kill” by Anthony Horowitz — “An effortless blend of humor and fair play…the often prickly relationship between the Watson-like Horowitz and the Holmes-like Hawthorne complements the intricate detective work worthy of a classic golden age whodunit.” — Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Gallows Court” by Martin Edwards — “Superb—a pitch-perfect blend of Golden Age charm and sinister modern suspense, with a main character to die for. This is the book Edwards was born to write.”—Lee Child, #1 New York Times bestselling author

“Game On: Tempting Twenty-Eight” by Janet Evanovich —  “Plum remains sassy, outspoken, brave, and definitely one-of-a-kind… a hilariously madcap, action-packed caper filled with crazy twists and some nail-biting suspense. [Game On] finds the irrepressible Stephanie and cohorts in absolutely top form.” —Booklist (starred review)

“Plymouth Undercover” by Pamela Kelley — “Meet Emma McCarthy, ….and her mother, Cindy… They’ve just inherited Court Street Investigations, a private detective agency—and its one part-time employee, eighty-year-old Mickey, a retired police detective. They expect typical cases like cheating spouses or workman’s comp, but when they are hired to find a local missing woman, they quickly learn that the agency also has a reputation for solving murders.” — Ingram Publishing Services

“The Book Supremacy” by Kate Carlisle — “[An] immensely satisfying page-turner of mystery.”–Jenn McKinlay, New York Times bestselling author

“The Man Who Died Twice” by Richard Osman — “Riveting. . . The twisty plot, knotty issues of relationships with life partners, and steadfast loyalty among the sleuths provide depth and poignancy. Those who prefer their mysteries with touches of spycraft, humor, and eccentricity will be well pleased.” —Publishers Weekly

“The Others” by Sarah Blau — “Singularly creepy . . .  Blau, an award-winning playwright in Israel, wades bravely . . . into issues of sex, religion and aging. The mystery is absorbing, but so is the passionate debate over how the world views women who decide not to have children — and how they view themselves.” — Sarah Lyall, New York Times Book Review

ADULT NON-FICTION

“Recovering from Narcissistic Abuse: How to Heal from Toxic Relationships and Emotional Abuse” by Priscilla Posey — “Recovering from narcissistic abuse and healing from a toxic relationship doesn’t have to be difficult. Even if you’ve tried other solutions which didn’t work before. This book is the solution.” — Amazon.com

“Trooper: The Heartwarming Story of the Bobcat Who Became Part of My Family” by Forrest Bryant Johnson –“Whenever middle-aged desert tour guide Forrest Bryant Johnson went out on his daily walks into the Mojave, all was usually peaceful and serene. But one beautiful summer day in 1987, Forrest heard a cry of distress. Following the cries, he came upon a small bobcat kitten, injured, orphaned, and desperately in need of help. So Forrest took his new feline friend home for a night. But when the little “trooper” clearly needed some more time to recoup, that night turned into two nights, a week, and eventually nineteen years. And so Trooper became a part of the Johnson family.” — Baker & Taylor

“When Harry met Minnie: A True Story of Love and Friendship” by Martha Teichner — “Teichner’s main themes are sure to warm readers in this cold coronavirus winter: the steadfast devotion between dogs and their owners, and the essential role friendship plays in sustaining both humans and their beloved pets … Teichner has learned that we all have the capacity to create and build new friendships and attachments at whatever age or stage of life. That such rewards are possible is the inspirational lesson for all the characters in ― and readers of ― this touching saga.” —The Washington Post

PARENTING

“Baby Sign Language Made Easy: 101 Signs to Start Communicating with Your Child Now” by Lane Rebelo — “Baby Sign Language Made Easy is a beautiful, easy-to-understand resource about how to learn and teach baby sign language to young children. Drawing on the benefits of baby sign language for both parent and child, Ms. Rebelo not only provides a thorough collection of useful signs, but shows you exactly how to introduce them to your child. This is a must-read for any parent eager to use baby sign language.” —Nina Garcia, author and parenting blogger at Sleeping Should Be Easy

BLUE/DVD MOVIES

“Jockey”
“Parallel Mothers”

JUVENILE FICTION

“The Christmas Pig” by J. K. Rowling — “Losing his favorite childhood toy on Christmas Eve, Jack and his new toy, the Christmas Pig, concoct a daring plan and embark on a magical journey to seek something lost—and to save the best friend Jack has ever known. By the internationally celebrated author of the Harry Potter series.” — Atlas Publishing

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Agent 9: Flood-a-geddon!” by James Burke — “A delightful graphic romp. With a blend of thrilling chase scenes and a generous helping of humor, this crowd pleaser should be catnip to fans of series like Aaron Blabey’s The Bad Guys. Spy aficionados will find this purr-fect.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Allergic” by Megan Wagner Lloyd — “Warm and well-paced… an encouraging tale for young readers engaging with the world of pets, family, and friendships.” — Publishers Weekly

“Amulet #1: The Stonekeeper” by Kazu Kibuishi — “When Emily and Navin’s mother is kidnapped by a tentacle creature on the first night inside their new home, Emily and Navin must figure out how to set things right and save their mother’s life. ” — Baker & Taylor

“Amulet #2: The Stonekeeper’s Curse” by Kazu Kibuishi — “Graphic novel star Kazu Kibuishi returns with his mysterious world full of new allies . . . and old enemies!Emily and Navin’s mother is still in a coma from the arachnopod’s poison, and there’s only one place to find help: Kanalis, the bustling, beautiful city of waterfalls. But when Em, her brother, and Miskit and the rest of the robotic crew aboard the walking house reach the city, they quickly realize that seeking help is looking for trouble, dangerous trouble.” — Scholastic

“Amulet #3: The Cloud Searchers” by Kazu Kibuishi — “This third book….. has the gaggle of heroes led by young Emily, the requisite prophecy fulfiller with unharnessed powers, searching for a fabled city in the clouds while dodging capture by evil elf overlords. Star Wars and Tolkien continue to loom large as influences, and the cinematically grand visuals of otherworldly scenery continue to be one of the series’ deftest draws. But plenty of action and complex characters (including a few who were bad guys not too long ago) will also satisfy.” — Ian Chipman. AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, c2010.

“Amulet #4: The Last Council” by Kazu Kibuishi — “Stellar artwork, imaginative character design, moody color and consistent pacing.” — Publishers Weekly

“Amulet #5: Prince of the Elves” by Kazu Kibuishi — “A must for all fantasy fans.” — Kirkus Reviews

“Amulet # 6: Escape from Lucien” by Kazu Kibuishi — “Navin and his classmates journey to Lucien, a city ravaged by war and plagued by mysterious creatures, where they search for a beacon essential to their fight against the Elf King. Meanwhile, Emily heads back into the Void with Max, one of the Elf King’s loyal followers, where she learns his darkest secrets. The stakes, for both Emily and Navin, are higher than ever.” — Amazon.com

“Amulet #7: Firelight” by Kazu Kibuishi — “Emily, Trellis, and Vigo visit Algos Island, where they can access and enter lost memories. They’re hoping to uncover the events of Trellis’s mysterious childhood — knowledge they can use against the Elf King. What they discover is a dark secret that changes everything. Meanwhile, the Voice of Emily’s Amulet is getting stronger, and threatens to overtake her completely.” — Amazon.com

“Amulet #8: Supernova” by Kazu Kibuishi — “Emily has lost control of her Amulet and is imprisoned in the Void, where she must find a way to escape the influence of the Voice. Meanwhile, Emily’s brother, Navin, travels to Lighthouse One, a space station where the Resistance is preparing to battle the approaching Shadow forces that would drain planet Alledia of all its resources. Emily and Navin must be smarter and stronger than ever to ensure Alledia’s survival.” — Amazon.com

“Anne of Green Gables: A Graphic Novel” by Mariah Marsden — “L. M. Montgomery’s classic tale is delicately and lovingly transformed into a graphic novel…Though the original tale is abridged and adapted, Marsden is careful not to rush the plot…[Thummler’s] soft, pastel palette is a perfect complement to the historical setting, and her softly glowing art is the heart of this fitting tribute to a beloved work.” (Snow Wildsmith, Booklist)

“Baby-Sitters Little Sister: Karen’s Kittycat Club” by Katy Farina — “The full-color illustrations are bright and detailed, and the story is fast paced and relatable.” — School Library Journal

“Best Friends” by Shannon Hale — “A heart-stabbing tale of the everyday social agonies of girlhood.” ―Wall Street Journal

“Cat Kid Comic Club: Perspectives” by Dav Pilkey — “Irreverent, laugh-out-loud funny and… downright moving, it’s a heartfelt celebration of coming into one’s own as an artist, with all its frustrations and joys.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Cici’s Journal: Lost and Found” by Joris Chamblain — “Movingly shows how human life contains more mysteries than any hidden room or secret code.”―Kirkus

“Cici’s Journal: The Adventures of a Writer-in-Training” by Joris Chamblain —
“The lessons are breezy, but the art is sumptuous: Neyret’s naturalistic illustrations have marvelous depth, with dense color, dynamic movement, and a fantastic use of light and shadow.”―Booklist

“Dinosaurs Before Dark” by Jenny Laird — “The #1 bestselling chapter book is now a graphic novel! Magic. Mystery. Time-travel. Get whisked back in time in the magic tree house with Jack and Annie!” — Amazon.com

“Dog Man and Cat Kid” by Dav Pilkey — “Action and mystery abound on the movie set in the fourth Dog Man book from worldwide bestselling author and artist Dav Pilkey.” — Amazon.com

“Dog Man Unleashed” by Dav Pilkey — “Dog Man is still learning a few tricks of the trade. Petey the Cat is out of the bag, and his criminal curiosity is taking the city by storm. Something fishy is going on! Can Dog Man unleash justice on this ruffian in time to save the city, or will Petey get away with the purr-fect crime?” — Amazon.com

“Donut Feed the Squirrel” by Mika Song — “Two problem-solving squirrels stage a successful doughnut heist in this amusing start to a graphic novel series for emerging readers.” —Shelf Awareness, starred review

“Friends Forever” by Shannon Hale — “With the combination of Hale’s lucid writing and Pham’s masterful portrayal of body and language and facial expression, this books homes in squarely and affirmingly on teen angst and worries.” ―Booklist, starred review

“Garlic & the Vampire” by Bree Paulsen — “Gorgeous artwork featuring anthropomorphized plants and colors reminiscent of those used in Kate Greenaway stories make this a joy to read… Perfect for chapter-book readers and up, this will delight anyone wanting a light adventure heavy on friendship and self-actualization.” — Booklist

“HiLo: Book 1, The Boy Who Crashed to Earth” by Judd Winick — “A perfect book for any kid who ever needed a friend and then had one with superpowers fall from space.” —Seth Meyers, actor, comedian and writer

“HiLo: Book 2, Saving the Whole Wide World” by Judd Winick — “[A] lively and entertaining ADVENTURE with enough risk to give it heft and plenty of solid friendship to keep readers buoyed… Lush, bright colors and a freewheeling approach to panels create an immersive environment.”—Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, starred review

“HiLo: Book 3, The Great Big Boom” by Judd Winick — “Hilo the robot boy and his best friend DJ must team up to track down DJ’s pal Gina, who was swallowed by a mysterious portal. In the process, Hilo and DJ are reunited with old friends, make new friends, and unearth more secrets from Hilo’s past. This third installment in the series delivers humor and cartoony, over-the-top adventures that fans and new readers will delight in …” — Elizabeth Nicolai, Anchorage Public Library, AK

“HiLo: Book 4, Waking the Monsters” by Judd Winick –“Take off on an action packed adventure with HILO Book 4! Dog Manmeets Big Nate in this hilarious New York Times bestselling graphic novel series that kids love! Chock full of MORE MONSTERS! MORE ACTION! MORE LAUGHS! MORE FUN!” — Amazon.com

“HiLo: Book 5, Then Everything Went Wrong” by Judd Winick — “Alien-robot boy Hilo and his human friend D.J. travel to Hilo’s home planet in this fifth graphic novel. Meanwhile, back on Earth, Hilo’s sister Izzy and pal Gina try to keep the boys’ absence on the down-low. Tantalizing revelations about Hilo’s past; expressive, action-packed panels; and wacky, slapstick humor (a robot version of D.J. shoots nickels from his bellybutton) make for another satisfying series addition.” — THE HORN BOOK, c2019.

“HiLo: Book 6, All the Pieces Fit” by Judd Winick — “Being a hero isn’t easy. But Hilo had no idea it would be this hard. Hilo came to earth because he was running from Razorwark. But he’s done running. Razorwark has come to earth. And the time has come for one final face to face showdown. What happens will decide the fate of the robot world . . . and Hilo’s future. The sacrifice will be great. But with Izzy’s help, Hilo finally knows what he has to do. Because THIS is how all the pieces fit.” — Publisher Annotation

“Hilo: Book 7, Gina the Girl who Broke the World” by Judd Winick — “Hundreds of years ago, MAGIC disappeared from Earth. At least…UNTIL NOW. Because suddenly, giant magical beings are appearing and only GINA can see them. Not to mention, Gina can somehow do magic herself. Magic is powerful. But it can also be DANGEROUS. With DJ and HILO’s help, can Gina figure out how to protect the magical beings from the creatures who are after them? AND how to use her magic to become who she was always meant to be? And can she do it WITHOUT putting the entire PLANET in JEAPARDY?! Find out in Hilo 7–a laugh-out-loud, action packed adventure filled with epic battles! friendship! annoying older brothers! annoying older sisters! good guys! bad guys! inappriate jokes! mangoes! magic! and much, much more!” — Publisher Annotation:

“Hilo: Book 8, Gina and the Big Secret” by Judd Winick — “There’s a NEW Earth! The world’s timeline has been turned upside down, and now magical creatures are EVERYWHERE. Gina has to fix things–FAST! With DJ and HILO’s help, can Gina find the key to turn the world back to what it was? Find out in Hilo 8–a laugh-out-loud, action-packed adventure filled with epic battles! True friendship! Good jokes! Bad jokes! Giant (hilarious) monsters! Spoiled royals! Prophecies! Good! Evil! And much, much more!” — Onix Annotations

“Little Monarchs” by Jonathan Case — “[A] prescient, thrilling, unusual and occasionally hilarious graphic novel. . . . Just about everything one might need to survive post-apocalyptic life on Earth is packed into these colorful pages. . . . Save the planet—read this book!”—Shelf Awareness, Starred Review

“Lord of the Fleas” by Dav Pilkey — ‘When a fresh bunch of baddies bust up the town, Dog Man is called into action — and this time he isn’t alone. With a cute kitten and a remarkable robot by his side, our heroes must save the day by joining forces with an unlikely ally: Petey, the World’s Most Evil Cat. But can the villainous Petey avoid vengeance and venture into virtue?” — Amazon.com

“Max Meow: Donuts and Danger” by John Gallagher — “Meowza! Max was just getting used to being a SECRET SUPER HERO when his and his best friend Mindy’s evil look-alikes show up in Kittyopolis! And what’s worse, they’re determined to take over the world’s donut supply–and Max and Mindy are getting blamed! Can Max and Mindy work together to save the day–and the donuts?! Find out in Max Meow Book 2: Donuts and Danger! A deliciously funny, action-packed new series that’s so good you’ll want seconds!” — Publisher Annotation:

“Max Meow: Pugs from Planet X” by John Gallagher — “Meowza! Space pugs have landed in Kittyopolis and they’re after the SPACE MEATBALL that gave Max his powers! Can Max and Mindy save Kittyopolis?!” — Amazon.com

“Mighty Jack” by Ben Hatke — “Jack foolishly trades the family car for a packet of seeds. He’s thrilled when his younger sister (who doesn’t speak) cares for the garden, but these seeds yield a sinister menagerie of sentient plant creatures. Graphic novelist Hatke employs a vibrant color palette dominated by verdant greens and with a panel layout that segues seamlessly between dialogue and action–all to terrific effect.” — THE HORN BOOK, c2017.

“Mighty Jack and the Goblin King” by Ben Hatke — “Full-bleedpages with hordes of fantastic monsters rendered in wild, organic shapes, and he further enlivens the story with snappy, comical dialogue.” ―Booklist

“Mighty Jack and Zita the Spacegirl” by Ben Hatke — “Hatke’s latest adventure is a wonderful and exciting page-turner, seamlessly blending dragons, giants, robots, and portals to other worlds, creating instant appeal for almost any young fan of graphic novels, fantasy, fairy tales, or science fiction…Perfection.” ―Kirkus,starred review

“Pilu of the Woods” by Mai K. Nguyen — “In Pilu of the Woods, Nguyen has crafted a sweet, gentle, beautifully-illustrated fable about childhood loss, and the friends who help us find ways to grow, even through the hardest times.” — Melanie Gillman (Steven Universe, As the Crow Flies)

“Real Friends” by Shannon Hale — “A wonderfully observed portrait of finding one’s place in your world.” ―Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Salt Magic” by Hope Larson — “An absorbing and fast-paced historical fantasy adventure. Mock’s illustrations make every enchanting, dangerous moment pop. Salt Magicis a feast of a tale that treats readers to an epic battle between evil forces and a courageous, persistent young hero.”—BookPage

“Sort of Super” by Eric Gapstur — “When his dad makes him hide his super powers, 11-year-old Wyatt Flynn, going behind his back, decides to make a difference in the community and teams up with his little sister to fight crime.” — Atlas Publishing

“Spider-Ham: Great Power, No Responsibility” by Steve Foxe — “… After long being derided by the citizens of New York, Spider-Ham has finally been recognized for his outsized contribution to the city’s safety, and receives the key to the city from none other than the mayor (and, being a cartoon universe, the key actually unlocks New York City’s political and financial institutions). Sure, it’s just a publicity stunt for the beleaguered mayor-and yeah, maybe every single other super hero was busy that day — but an award is an award! Of course, Spider-Ham isn’t paying attention to the fine print telling him he didn’t actually get to keep the key, and he swings off without returning the highly coveted oversized object.” — Publisher Annotation:

“Spy School: The Graphic Novel” by Stuart Gibbs — “Ben Ripley is recruited for a magnet school with a focus on science-but he’s entirely shocked to discover that the school is actually a front for a junior C.I.A. academy. Ben becomes an undercover agent and goes on his first assignment in this graphic novel adaptation of SPY SCHOOL”– Baker & Taylor

“The Amber Anthem” by Mark Siegel — “While Oona Lee and her friends search for the Amber Anthem on Salassandra to protect the Five Worlds from the evil Mimic, Stan Moon dispatches an evil Jax robot to assassinate the team while he tracks down a Vanishing Illness-infected An Tzu.” — Atlas Publishing

“The Aquanaut” by Dan Santat — “The art in this graphic tale is something special… Santat’s vividly expressive visuals are, even more than usual, riveting.” — Kirkus Reviews

“The Baby-Sitters Club: Good-Bye Stacey, Good-Bye” by Gabriela Epstein — “Members of the Baby-sitter’s Club are devastated to learn that Stacey is moving back to New York, especially her best friend Claudia, and wonder how they’ll survive without her.” — Atlas Publishing

“The Bad Guys” by Aaron Blabey — “The Bad Guys, Mr. Wolf, Mr. Shark, Mr. Snake, and Mr. Piranha, want to be heroes, and they decide that the way to do it is free the 200 dogs in the city dog pound–but their plan soon goes awry.” — Baker & Taylor

“The Bad Guys in Alien vs Bad Guys” by Aaron Blabey — They may look like Bad Guys, but these wannabe heroes are doing good deeds…whether you like it or not! This New York Times bestselling illustrated series is perfect for fans of Dog Man and Captain Underpants.The Bad Guys are vanishing! A creature with TONS of teeth and WAY too many butts is stealing them, one by one. Is this the end for the Bad Guys? Maybe. Will it be funny? You bet your butts it will!” — Publisher’s Annotation

“The Bad Guys in Attack of the Zittens” — “[T]his book instantly joins the classic ranks of Captain Underpants and The Stinky Cheese Man. We challenge anyone to read this and keep a straight face.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review*

“The Bad Guys in Cut to the Chase” by Aaron Blabey — “I wish I’d had these books as a kid. Hilarious!” — Dav Pilkey, creator of Captain Underpants and Dog Man

“The Bad Guys in do-you-think-he-saurus?!” by Aaron Blabey — “The Bad Guys have flown through outer space, made it back to Earth, and managed to land in exactly the right place… but exactly the wrong TIME. Who knew alien escape pods were capable of time travel?!? And now that they’re 65 million years in the past, they must avoid being eaten by dinosaurs and fix their broken time machine if they ever want to get back home before an evil alien destroys the whole world!” — Back Cover

“The Bad Guys in Intergalactic Gas” by Aaron Blabey — “The bad news? The world is ending. The good news? The Bad Guys are back to save it! Sure, they might have to “borrow” a rocket. And there might be something nasty in one of the spacesuits. And Mr. Piranha miiiiight have eaten too many bean burritos. Surviving this mission may only be one small step for man, but it’s one giant leap for the Bad Guys.” — Back Cover

“The Bad Guys in Mission Unpluckable” by Aaron Blabey — “The Bad Guys’ Next Mission? Rescue 10,000 chickens from a high-tech cage farm. But they are up against sizzling lasers, one feisty tarantula, and their very own Mr. Snake…who’s also known as “The Chicken Swallower.” What could possibly go wrong? Get ready to laugh up your lunch with the baddest bunch of do-gooders in town!” — Back Cover

“The Bad Guys in Superbad” by Aaron Blabey — “The Bad Guys have strangely acquired SUPERPOWERS! But their powers might be, well, defective. They can only do things like blow their own pants off in public. Not exactly what you’d call hero-caliber skills.Defective or not, the Bad Guys have a job to do. With Dr. Marmalade ready to destroy the world, Mr. Wolf, Mr. Snake, Mr. Piranha, and Mr. Shark finally have their chance to be (super)heroes! And this time, they may just get some help…” — Amazon.com

“The Bad Guys in the Baddest Day Ever” by Aaron Blabey — “All hail Crown Prince Marmalade! Surrender to his evil magnificence! Kneel before his butt-handed glory! Or…like…DON’T! The Bad Guys and even Badder Girls might have been knocked down, but does that mean they’ll stay down? No way, chicos! Pull on your party pants-it’s the ultimate battle between Bad and BAAAAAAD!” — Amazon.com

“The Bad Guys in the Big Bad Wolf” by Aaron Blabey — “When Mr. Wolf is blown up to Godzilla proportions, the Bad Guys find themselves in monster-sized trouble. They must figure out how to stop an alien invasion and get Wolfie back to his old self before the world is totally destroyed. Good thing they have the International League of Heroes on their side, and some newly honed superpowers ready to put to the test…Everyone’s favorite hero has become a menace to society! Can the Bad Guys save the day? You know it!” — Amazon.com

“The Bad Guys in the Dawn of the Underlord” by Aaron Blabey — “The Bad Guys – sorry, Shadow Squad-G – have finally saved the world from butt-handed evil. And now it’s time to celebrate! But when one member of the team makes a shocking discovery, the party might be over sooner than everyone thinks…” — Amazon.com

“The Bad Guys in the Furball Strikes Back” by Aaron Blabey — “The Bad Guys are about to have a very BAD day!Mr. Wolf and his bad buddies have messed with the wrong guinea pig — one who is secretly an evil mad scientist. And the nasty little furball wants revenge! Will they survive? Will they be heroes? And will they ever stop trying to eat each other?!?It’s time for the Bad Guys to spring into action!” — Amazon.com

“The Bad Guys in the One?!” by Aaron Blabey — “Seriously, WHAT is going on with Snake?! Terrible powers have been revealed! Evil allies have materialized! Inter-dimensional doors have opened! Shady-looking cloaks have been purchased! What is his deal?!And that’s not all! Why does Agent Fox suddenly have a whole lot more backstory than we’d counted on?! Dang it! We need answers! WHAT IS GOING ON HERE?!Wolf and the gang are back. And things are worse than ever. Or badder than ever… if you think that sounds cooler and don’t have a problem with bad grammar…” — Amazon.com

“The Bad Guys in They’re Bee-hind You!” by Aaron Blabey — “POP QUIZ! You are on the roof of a skyscraper. Every floor of that building has nasty things that just don’t like you. And you REALLY need to get to the basement. Whaddaya do?! (And no, you can’t just join the B-Team and fly away in their glamorous new spaceship.) Think quick, chico, because the multiverse is getting worse!” — Amazon.com

“The Cobalt Prince” by Mark Siegel — “A dazzling interplanetary fantasy . . . that will easily appeal to fans of Naruto or Avatar: The Last Airbender.” —Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

“The Creepy Case File of Margo Maloo” by Drew Weing — “With a saturated color palette, noirish dialogue, and a thought-provoking message about gentrification, this first in a series (originally published as a webcomic) is packed with warm laughs and smart, spooky mystery.”―Booklist

“The Creepy Case Files of Margo Maloo: 2, The Monster Mall” by Drew Weing —
“Weing’s artwork further adds to the lighthearted fun: his detailed backgrounds, jewel-toned color palette, only slightly spooky monsters, and stylish character designs give this lots of visual appeal. Fans of the first installment won’t want to miss this sequel.” ―Booklist

“The Creepy Case Files of Margo Maloo: 3, The Tangled Web” by Drew Weing — “In the third volume of this beloved graphic novel series The Creepy Case Files of Margo Maloo: The Tangled Web, Drew Weing delivers a fresh and funny take on the age-old battle between kids and closet-dwelling monsters.” — Amazon.com

“The Emerald Gate” by Mark Siegel — “In this electrifying conclusion to the graphic sci-fi fantasy series, Oona, Jax and An Tzu must find the green beacon on a dangerous planet as the final battle looms while fighting off the evil Stan Moon in order to save the 5 Worlds.” — Atlas Publishing

“The Fifth Quarter” by Mike Dawson — “Sixth grade is here! Just when Lori starts to get comfortable, things change again. Lori’s friends have found new interests. Her dad goes back to work for the first time since she was born. And when her mom decides to start coaching in the new after-school basketball league, Lori’s home life collides with her passion. To make matters worse, all her friends are playing for the opposing team. Lori feels frustrated and alone, like she might be falling behind in her game.” — Amazon.com

“The Flower Garden” by Renee Kurilla — “A cheery, colorful jaunt through a garden gnome’s world, arranged lovingly and thoughtfully in graphic novel form. . .promises to be an enjoyable read for both eager and hesitant beginning ­readers.” ―School Library Journal

“The Golden Hour” by Niki Smith — “With a soft start and a gentle build, Smith’s graphic novel details the realities of Manuel’s trauma response while reveling in subdued, generous scenes that showcase the three friends’ everyday joys.”―Publishers Weekly, starred review

“The Knight at Dawn” by Jenny Laird — “A castle. A knight. A quest! When the magic tree house whisks Jack and Annie back to the Middle Ages, they’re looking for a knight. Instead, they find the Great Hall of a castle where a feast is under way. But Jack and Annie aren’t exactly welcome guests!” — Amazon.com

“The Legend of Brightblade” by Ethan M. Aldridge — “Aldridge paints a beautiful medieval fantasy. Bright watercolors bring energy to the elegant designs—detailed enough for rich world building, simple enough for young readers—and the magic system based on making music, no small feat for a graphic novel, really shines. An excellent option for budding fans of fantasy.” — Booklist

“The Red Maze” by Mark Siegel –“A dazzling interplanetary fantasy . . . that will easily appeal to fans of Naruto or Avatar: The Last Airbender.” —Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

“The Rema Chronicles: Realm of the Blue Mist” by Kazu Kibuishi — “The full-color, Japanese manga-flavored art style is fluid and natural, highlighting expressiveness, action, and alien-world details with ease. A fast-paced journey through an engrossing new world.” — Kirkus Reviews

“The Sand Warrior” by Mark Siegel — “This sweeping graphic-novel saga features inventive world-building, with history, mythology, and traditions naturally integrated into the narrative. The installment ends triumphantly and tantalizingly; readers will eagerly await book two.” —The Horn Book Magazine

“The Secret Garden on 81st Street” by Ivy Noelle Weir –“The Secret Garden with a twist: in this follow-up to Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy, this full-color graphic novel moves Mary Lennox to a New York City brownstone, where she and her very first group of friends restore an abandoned rooftop garden…and her uncle’s heart.” — Annotation

“The Tea Dragon Festival” by Katie O’Neill — “Aedhan is a young dragon who was appointed to protect the village, but fell asleep in the forest eighty years ago. With the aid of Rinn’s adventuring uncle Erik and his partner Hesekiel, they investigate the mystery of his enchanted sleep… but Rinn’s real challenge is to help Aedhan come to terms with feeling that he cannot get back the time he has lost.” — Baker & Taylor

“The Tea Dragon Society” by Katie O’Neill — “After discovering a lost tea dragon in the marketplace, Greta learns about the dying art form of tea dragon caretaking from the kind tea shop owners, Hesekiel and Erik. As she befriends them and their shy ward, Minette, Greta sees how the craft enriches their lives—and eventually her own.” — Amazon.com

“The Tea Dragon Tapestry” by Katie O’Neill — “As Greta struggles to impress a master blacksmith in search of an apprentice, she questions the true meaning of crafting, while Minette receives a surprise package from the monastery where she was once training to become a prophetess.” — Baker & Taylor

“Tidesong” by Wendy Xu — “Xu gives her solo debut fresh allure with richly evoked Chinese mythology–inspired dragons and a supporting cast of idiosyncratic, endearing characters.” — Publishers Weekly

“Twins” by Varian Johnson — “The sibling bond is palpable and precious as each conflict and triumph pushes them apart or pulls them together…. A touching, relatable story of identity, sisterhood, and friendship.” — Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Volcanoes: Fire and Life” by Jon Chad — “Chad’s well-drawn and clearly labeled diagrams in rich, saturated colors concisely explain key concepts, and vocabulary words are defined both in the text and a glossary. While the stylized cartoon figures and adventure narrative are an entertaining framework, the science fittingly occupies the center stage.” ―Booklist

“Wingbearer” by Marjorie M. Liu — “Wondrously constructed. Nail-biting stakes, staggeringly good action sequences, and characterization and world-building as rich as in any prose novel make this series opener an effortless recommendation.” — New York Times Book Review

“Wings of Fire: The Dark Secret” by Barry Deutsch based on Tui Sutherland’s book — “When Starflight is kidnapped by the NightWings he finds that the kingdom of his birth is a miserable place, full of terrible secrets–and that, with his fellow dragonets too far away to help, the fate of two kingdoms rests in his talons.” — Baker & Taylor

JUVENILE MUSIC

“Captain and Sea Monsters” by Rockin’ Ron the Friendly Pirate

JUVENILE NON-FICTION

“Dancing with Granddad: An Alzheimer’s Story for Children and Their Families” by Linda Bozzo — “Dancing with Granddad takes young readers on an age-appropriate learning journey with Nia, a 7-year-old girl, whose grandfather has Alzheimer’s and will need to move to a new home where he will be safer. Readers also learn that while he is changing, the love that Nia and her grandfather have never will.” — Alzheimer’s Association of America

YOUNG ADULT BIOGRAPHY

“All Boys Aren’t Blue” by George M. Johnson — “The conversational tone will leave readers feeling like they are sitting with an insightful friend . . . This young adult memoir is a contemporary hallmark of the blossoming genre. Johnson anchors the text with encouragement and realistic guidance for queer Black youth.” ―School Library Journal

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

“A Spark Within the Forge” by Nicole Andelfinger — “An all-new official standalone graphic novel prequel to the New York Times best-selling YA series An Ember in the Ashes novels from creator Sabaa Tahir!” — Publisher’s Annotation

“A Thief Among the Trees” by Nicole Andelfinger — “Taking place years before the bestselling An Ember in the Ashes novel series, this standalone original graphic novel follows three young military recruits: Elias, Helene, and Tavi, during their brutal training as soldiers for the Martial Empire. ” — Amazon.com

“Almost American Girl: An Illustrated Memoir” by Robin Ha — “Touching and subtly humorous, this emotive memoir is as much about the steadfast bond between a mother and daughter as it is about the challenges of being an immigrant in America.” — Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Anne of West Philly” by Ivy Noelle Weir — “Anne of Green Gables with a twist: in this follow-up to Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy and The Secret Garden on 81st Street, this full-color graphic novel moves Anne Shirley to modern-day West Philadelphia, where where she finds new friends, new rivals, and a new family.” — Amazon.com

“Avatar the Last Airbender: Toph Beifong’s Metalbending Academy” by Faith Erin Hicks — “Things are looking bright at the Beifong Metalbending Academy! But after all the adventures Toph’s had with Aang, Sokka, Zuko, and Katara, the whole thing feels a bit dull. Luckily, Sokka and Suki come to visit and reintroduce some familiar faces from their wandering days. And while out and about to celebrate, Toph discovers something that just might put the sparkle back in her eye…” — Amazon.com

“Between Shades of Gray” by Ruta Sepetys — “At once a suspenseful, drama-packed survival story, a romance, and an intricately researched work of historial fiction.” —The Wall Street Journal

“Crushing” by Sophie Burrows — “A charming graphic novel debut . . . that recommends optimism and a wry sense of humor while acknowledging the ubiquity of loneliness.” —Publishers Weekly

“Displacement” by Kiku Hughes — “Art features straightforward linework with full-color, often spare backgrounds that focus on characters. …Hughes centers [Kiku’s] powerlessness to create a compelling story about an oft-overlooked period of U.S. aggression against its own citizens.”―Publisher’s Weekly

“Eighty Days” by A. C. Esquerra — “A pilot wants nothing more than to fly. Or so he thought, until he crosses paths with a mysterious thief whose tricks draw him into unchartered territory and new adventure. In a life where the truth changes as quickly as clouds in the sky, the pilot must decide for himself what freedom really means.” — Amazon.com

“Fine: A Comic about Gender” by Rhea Ewing — “[A] wondrous tapestry of personal reflections and meditations on how people view subjects like gender, masculinity, femininity, and community . . . Ewing’s art beautifully reflects the individuality and wishes of their subjects . . . Recommended for everyone who cares about better understanding the complicated, varied, gorgeous mess that is gender.” ― Sarah Rice, Booklist, starred review

“Frank Herbert’s Dune:The Graphic Novel: Book 1” by Brian Herbert — “Intricate . . . well defined . . . easy to follow . . . blending the aristocratic costumery, sci-fi technology, and desert landscape into a world that is unmistakably Dune.”―Booklist

“Frieren: Beyond Journey’s End. Vol 1” by Kanehito Yamada — “Elf mage Frieren and her courageous fellow adventurers have defeated the Demon King and brought peace to the land. But Frieren will long outlive the rest of her former party. How will she come to understand what life means to the people around her? Decades after their victory, the funeral of one her friends confronts Frieren with her own near immortality. Frieren sets out to fulfill the last wishes of her comrades and finds herself beginning a new adventure…” — Baker & Taylor

“Frieren: Beyond Journey’s End Vol. 2” by Kanehito Yamada — “At Eisen’s urging, Frieren and her apprentice Fern head north seeking the land where heroes’ souls are said to rest, which also happens to be the location of the Demon King’s castle. Along the way, they meet Eisen’s apprentice, whose fighting skills may come in handy—though the Demon King is long gone, his surviving minions have unfinished business with Frieren!” — Amazon.com

“Frieren: Beyond Journey’s End Vol. 3” by Kanehito Yamada — “An old enemy returns as Frieren continues her journey north. Decades ago, Frieren and her party defeated a servant of the Demon King called Aura the Guillotine, one of the powerful demons known as the Seven Sages of Destruction. Now Aura is back with a score to settle. But what price did Frieren pay for victory in the past, and how will the choices she made then affect the present?” — Amazon.com

“Go With the Flow” by Lily Williams — “…the story is firmly grounded in the realities faced by girls and women, and the timely messages of empowerment and political dialogue will resonate with socially minded youth.” Booklist

“Graceling” by Gareth Hinds — “This is at its heart much more than just an adventure story: It is a story that looks at consent and power over others and a romance between two people dealing with the ways control over themselves affects the larger world—and their hearts as well…. An adaptation of a YA classic that is sure to draw in new fans.” — Kirkus Reviews

“Heartstopper: Volume 1” by Alice Osman — “Realistic yet uplifting, this tale of self-discovery will make readers’ hearts skip a beat.” — School Library Journal

“Heartstopper: Volume 2” by Alice Osman — “Nick and Charlie are best friends, but one kiss has changed everything. In the aftermath, Charlie is sure that Nick isn’t interested, but Nick is more confused than ever.Love works in surprising ways, and Nick comes to see the world from a new perspective. He discovers all sorts of things about his friends, his family… and himself.” — Amazon.com

“Heartstopper: Volume 3” by Alice Osman –“Charlie didn’t think Nick could ever like him back, but now they’re officially boyfriends. Nick has even found the courage to come out to his mom.But coming out isn’t something that happens just once, and Nick and Charlie try to figure out when to tell their friends that they’re dating. Not being out to their classmates gets even harder during a school trip to Paris. As Nick and Charlie’s feelings get more serious, they’ll need each other more than ever.” — Amazon.com

“Heartstopper: Volume 4” by Alice Osman — “Charlie and Nick’s relationship has been going really well, and Charlie thinks he’s ready to say those three little words: I love you.

Nick feels the same way, but he’s got a lot on his mind — especially the thought of coming out to his dad and the fact that Charlie might have an eating disorder.

As a new school year begins, Charlie and Nick will have to learn what love really means.” — Amazon.com

“Himawari House” by Harmony Becker — “Becker’s art is intricate and rich at times, quick and playful at others. The story will tug at your heartstrings and make you laugh. All told, “Himawari House” will comfort young readers who are imagining their lives ahead and trigger nostalgic joy in older readers looking back.” ―New York Times

“In the Shadow of the Fallen Towers: The Seconds, Minutes, Hours, Days, Weeks, Months, and Years After the 9/11 Attacks” by Don Brown — “Notable is Brown’s ability to depict, in this economical format, the event’s wide-ranging aftereffects, including Islamophobia, the physical and mental health toll on workers dismantling “the Pile,” and U.S. soldiers ending up on horseback in Afghanistan.” –Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Invincible Iron Man: Ironheart” by Brian Michael Bendis — “A new Iron Age begins! From the violent streets of Chicago, a new armored hero rises! Clad in her very own Iron Man armor, Riri Williams is ready to show the world what she can do as the self-made hero of tomorrow. Her technology just might change the face of the Marvel Universe forever…if she survives the experience. But is she ready for all the problems that come with stepping into Iron Man’s jet boots? Where’s a genius billionaire playboy philanthropist when you need one?” — Amazon.com

“Invincible Iron Man: Ironheart Choices” by Brian Michael Bendis — “The whole world loves Riri Williams, A.K.A. Ironheart! Well, except for those who have a bone to pick with how she’s doing the job. And the deadly villain who’d like to take a piece out of her. Come to think of it, that’s a whole lot of people who aren’t that fond of her! What’s a girl to do? Striking out on her own, Riri has her idealism put to the test by a world she doesn’t yet understand. How far will she go to do what she knows is right? And how can she handle the biggest threat she’ll ever encounter: a headstrong Tony Stark A.I. that’s decided it knows what’s best for the world? Plus: An international incident sets the stage for one of the biggest Iron Man stories ever!” — Publisher’s Annotation

“Let’s Talk About It :The Teen’s Guide to Sex, Relationships, and Being a Human” by Erika Moen — “A refreshingly inclusive read…. offering comprehensive, no-nonsense information on sex and sexuality.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Lore Olympus: Volume 1” by Rachel Smythe — “Sensitive and elegant . . . Beautiful artwork and compelling characters [take] the forefront of this romantic, tech-savvy retelling of Greek mythology.” —Booklist

“Magical Boy” by The Kao — “Descended from a long line of Magical Girls tasked with defending humanity from a dark, ancient evil, Max, an average high school trans boy, wonders if he can take on his destiny, save the world and become the new Magical Boy.” — Atlas Publishing

“Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy” by Rey Terciero — “[…] this tale offers a contemporary vision of sisterhood that will appeal to a diverse audience.”―Kirkus

“Mooncakes” by Suzanne Walker — “This graphic novel is the joyful fantasy romance we all need right now, and it might just restore your faith in magic.” — Charlie Jane Anders, author of All the Birds in the Sky

“Mouse Guard: Volume 3, The Black Axe” by David Petersen — “This prequel, set in 1115, fulfills the promise the wise oldfur Celanawe made to tell Lieam of the day his paw first touched the Black Axe. The arrival of distant kin takes Celanawe on an adventure that will carry him across the sea to uncharted waters and lands all while unraveling the legend of Farrer, the blacksmith who forged the mythic axe.” — Publisher’s Annotation

“Other Boys” by Damian Alexander — “Damian Alexander traces with poignant accuracy the story of boys who find themselves erased at a certain age. This book should be read by queer kids and parents alike.”
Garrard Conley, New York Timesbestselling author of Boy Erased

“Shang-Chi: Brothers and Sisters” by Gene Luen Yang — “THE MASTER RETURNS! An ancient and evil secret society has stayed in hiding since the death of their leader, Zheng Zhu. But now his successor has been chosen to shift the balance of power in the world…Zheng Zhu’s son, Shang-Chi! Witness the Marvel Universe’s greatest fighter return to a world of death and destruction he thought he left behind long ago…and discover the secrets to Shang-Chi’s past that will change his world forever.” — Grand Central Pub

“Shang-Chi: Shang-Chi vs. the Marvel Universe” by Gene Luen Yang — “…The martial arts master and his family are back — and this time, they’re colliding head-to-head with Earth’s biggest and best heroes! Shang-Chi has finally taken his place as the leader of the Five Weapons Society. But using a secret evil organization as a force for good won’t be easy. And it’s about to get a lot harder when Shang-Chi’s fellow super heroes — including the amazing Spider-Man — start to see him as the bad guy! …” — Publisher’s Annotation

“Solo: Leveling: 1” by Chugong — “Known as the the Weakest Hunter of All Mankind, E-rank hunter Jinwoo Sung’s contribution to raids amounts to trying not to get killed. Unfortunately, between his mother’s hospital bills, his sister’s tuition, and his own lack of job prospects, he has no choice but to continue to put his life on the line. So when an opportunity arises for a bigger payout, he takes it…only to come face-to-face with a being whose power outranks anything he’s ever seen! With the party leader missing an arm and the only healer a quivering mess, can Jinwoo some­how find them a way out?” — Publisher’s Annotation

“Solo: Leveling 2” by Chugong — “ARISE! Once dubbed the Weakest Hunter of All Mankind, Jinwoo is now…well, something else entirely. Armed with his mysterious system, he’s currently powerful enough to single-handedly clear dungeons that once would have proven life-threatening. He just has to ready himself to take on the Demon’s Castle—and what better way to do so than finishing a quest? Exclusive new weapons and skills from an assassin-class job may be just what Jinwoo needs… but the system seems to have other plans for him!” — Publisher’s Annotation

“Spinning” by Tillie Walden — “Tillie Walden’s Spinning is an engrossing, gorgeously quiet look back at the 12 years she devoted to figure and synchronized skating.” ―New York Times

Teen Titans: Beast Boy” by Kami Garcia — “Author Kami Garcia (Beautiful Creatures) and artist Gabriel Picolo, the creative duo behind the New York Times, USA Today, and Publishers Weekly bestseller Teen Titans: Raven, take you on a journey of self-discovery and acceptance, while reminding us the value of true friendship–especially when life gets wild.” — Publisher’s Annotation

“Teen Titans: Raven” by Kami Garcia — “Picolo’s spare, effective use of color and slightly edgy art helps situate the story in a supernaturally tinged world of high-school drama. …Garcia’s exploration of the connection between memory and identity offers a promising entrée to the Teen Titans series.” —Publishers Weekly

“The Enemy Delusion” by Claudia Gray — “In this second book of a graphic novel trilogy, two teenagers on opposite sides of the same extinction-level event get drawn deeper into conspiracies that could doom them–if the planet doesn’t self-destruct first.” — Random House, Inc.

“The Greatest Thing” by Sarah Winifred Searle — “Set in an era when landline phones were still in use, the story explores sexuality, mental health, and the messiness that goes with understanding of self in ways that will resonate with contemporary readers.”―Kirkus

“The Magic Fish” by Trung Le Nguyen — “A sparkling debut…about the child of Vietnamese immigrants who teaches through fairy tales—yet wrestles with how to come out to his family.” —The Washington Post

“The Mars Challenge: The Past, Present, and Future of Human Spaceflight” by Alison Wilgus — “Travel to deep space and back again with The Mars Challenge, a nonfiction graphic novel for teens about the science and logistics of a manned mission to Mars.” — Amazon.com

“The Prince and the Dressmaker” by Jen Wang — “Leave it to such a gifted artist to create this love letter to aesthetic design set against the story of a relationship blossoming between seamstress and prince.” ―Washington Post, from their “10 Best Graphic Novels of 2018”

“The Shadow Threat” by Claudia Gray — “Welcome to a brand-new vision of one of comics’ most famous tragedies, from New York Times bestselling author Claudia Gray and illustrator Eric Zawadzki. In this first graphic novel in a trilogy, explore Krypton like never before: through the eyes of two young people on opposite sides of the same extinction-level event. ” — Amazon.com

“The Subtle Knife” by Stephanie Melchior-Durand — “In this graphic adaptation of Pullman’s classic, Will, a boy from our world in search of his father, stumbles upon a window into another world. There, he meets Lyra and her dæmon, Pantalaimon, who have traveled from their own world, leaving behind both allies and enemies, in search of answers about the ineffable Dust. The art shines when depicting the fantastical worlds the characters inhabit, including sweeping landscapes and cityscapes.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Wake: The Hidden History of Women-led Slave Revolts” by Rebecca Hall — “A vividly illustrated account of Black women rebels that combines elements of memoir, archival research, and informed imaginings of its subjects’ lives…. An urgent, brilliant work of historical excavation.”—Kirkus *starred review*

“Witch Hat Atelier” by Kamome Shirahama — “A beautifully-illustrated story about a girl who longs for magic in her life and learns that, on the inside, she already is what she wishes she could be. Reminiscent of Studio Ghibli, this lushly-drawn story has captured the hearts of fantasy fans worldwide.” — Amazon.com

Categories
Full List of New Arrivals

NEW ARRIVALS – OCTOBER 2021

ADULT FICTION

“Civilizations” by Laurent Binet – “An ambitious and highly entertaining novel of revisionist history from the author of the international bestseller HHhH, Laurent Binet’s Civilizations is nothing less than a strangely believable counterfactual history of the modern world, fizzing with ideas about colonization, empire-building, and the eternal human quest for domination. It is an electrifying novel by one of Europe’s most exciting writers.” — McMillan Palgrave

“Cloud Cuckoo Land” by Anthony Doerr – “Doerr builds a community of readers and nature lovers that transcends the boundaries of time and space … This is just one of the many narrative miracles worked by the author as he brings a first-century story to its conclusion in 2146. As the pieces of this magical literary puzzle snap together, a flicker of hope is sparked for our benighted world.” Kirkus, starred review

“Crossroads” by Jonathan Franzen — “Franzen returns with a sweeping and masterly examination of the shifting culture of early 1970s America, the first in a trilogy . . . Throughout, Franzen exhibits his remarkable ability to build suspense through fraught interpersonal dynamics. It’s irresistible.” ―Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Light from Uncommon Stars” by Ryka Aoki — “Aoki’s novel is an exciting, wild web of an adventure, an unputdownable book about music, found family, and identity. Diving into the tough subjects, Aoki’s book emerges with a joyful, queer, radical ballad of a story. . .”―Booklist, starred review

“State of Terror” by Hilary Rodham Clinton and Louise Penny — “Consistently entertaining….Penny and Clinton demonstrate a sure hand at international intrigue and narrative pacing….The real key to ‘State of Terror,’ though, is its secret weapon: female friendship.” ― The Washington Post

“The Lincoln Highway” by Amor Towles — “[A] playfully thought-provoking novel . . . [Towles] juggles the pieces of his plot deftly, shifting from voice to voice, skirting sentimentality and quirkiness with a touch of wistful regret, and leading up to an ending that is bound to provoke discussion.” Booklist (starred)

ADULT MYSTERY

“Nerve Attack” by S. Lee Manning — “Manning writes with such authority about the shady world and shifting loyalties of the intelligence community, it’s a wonder her novels aren’t riddled with redactions. At once terrifying, unpredictable, and all too believable, NERVE ATTACK will leave you breathless.” –Chris Holm, Anthony award winning author of The Killing Kind.

“To Kill the Messenger” by Philip S. Cook — This is the story of Russell Griswold—an itinerant newspaper editor—who came to northern New Mexico after the Civil War to start a weekly newspaper in the small town of San Miguel. He hoped to earn a modest living and help build a thriving and vibrant community.

Griswold’s published comments on activities that he finds unlawful or inappropriate were often cruel and demeaning. Ultimately this leads to a sudden and violent attempt on his life.

There is any number of possible suspects whether aggrieved or not. … So, who would want to kill a newspaper editor?” — Blurb, Inc.

ADULT NON-FICTION

“My Grandmother’s Hands: Racialized Trauma and the Pathway to Mending Our Hearts and Bodies” by Resmaa Menakem — “My Grandmother’s Hands is full of wisdom and understanding. In it, Resmaa Menakem offers a new way to understand racism and, more importantly, to heal it. This book lays out a path to freedom and peace, first for individual readers, then for our culture as a whole. A must-read for everyone who cares about our country.”―Nancy Van Dyken, LP, LICSW, author of Everyday Narcissism

“Peril” by Bob Woodward and Robert Costa — “Woodward and Costa make a powerful case that America has had a narrow escape. It leaves all Americans, in particular the Republican Party, with some thinking to do”—Justin Webb, The Times, UK.

“To Save The People From Themselves”: The Emergence of American Judicial Review and the Transformation of the Constitutions” by Robert J. Steinfeld — “… Robert Steinfeld examines how the distinctive US form of constitutional review emerged from a background tradition in which legislatures and executives assessed constitutionality in their regular work. Combining institutional, political, and intellectual history, Professor Steinfeld shows how the transformation was both rapid and strongly contested. Seeing judicial review as part of a conservative counterrevolution against the democratic excesses of post-Revolutionary legislatures, this is an important new contribution to long-standing discussions about judicial review in the United States.” — Mark Tushnet, William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law Emeritus, Harvard Law School

“Voices from the Pandemic: Americans Tell Their Stories of Crisis, Courage and Resilience” by Eli Saslow — “Saslow has done a sterling job of capturing real people’s experiences of the start of the pandemic.” –Tampa Bay Times

VERMONT NON-FICTION

“Vermont History: Volume 89, No. 2, Summer/Fall 2021”

PARENTING

“Hunt, Gather, Parent: What Ancient Cultures Can Teach Us About the Lost Art of Raising Happy, Helpful Little Humans” by Michaeleen Doucleff, Ph. D. — “Hunt, Gather, Parent is full of smart ideas that I immediately wanted to force on my own kids. (I wish I’d read it at the start of the pandemic, when I made their chore charts.) Doucleff is a dogged reporter who’s good at observing families and breaking down what they’re doing.”
—Pamela Druckerman, The New York Times Book Review

“Parenting 4 Social Justice: Tips, Tools, and Inspiration for Conversations & Action with Kids” by Angela Berkfield — “Berkfield, a social justice training facilitator and cofounder of the Root Social Justice Center, has written this volume with five co-authors…. Each chapter starts with questions for reflection that can be used as starting points for further conversation with kids. The book teaches how to build seven social justice principles into discussion and action, then shows how to apply these principles to racial, economic, gender, and disability justice. Berkfield asserts that people gain personal power when their basic needs are met; then violence, addiction, or isolation can begin to abate.” — Julia M. Reffner. LIBRARY JOURNAL

“The Life of Fred: Edgewood” by Stanley F. Schmidt Ph. D. — “This is a child-directed course. The student reads the adventure story, does the math problems that occur as a natural part of the story, and checks their answers (the solutions are right there for the looking.) And learns to love math in the process! You will not get the detailed formula explanations that you get in a traditional math book. I am still amazed that kids can read the story and learn the concepts, but they do!” — Amazon.com

“Zillions of Practice Problems: Fractions” by Stanley F. Schmidt Ph. D. — “Practice problems for the first book in the Life of Fred Upper Elementary/Middle School Series. Need more practice with fractions? Zillions of Practice Problems Fractions has you covered” — Amazon.com

ITEMS

Orion StarBlast Telescope

PICTURE BOOK

“A Day with Yayah” by Nicola I. Campbell
“All the Way to the Top: How One Girl’s Fight for Americans with Disabilities Changed Everything” by Annette Bay Pimentl
“Bodies are Cool” by Tyler Feder
“Bright Star” by Yuyi Morales
“Change Sings: A Children’s Anthem” by Amanda Gorman
“Einstein: The Fantastic Journey of a Mouse through Space and Time” by Torben Kuhlmann
“How Many Seeds in a Pumpkin?” by Margaret McNamara
“Listen” by Gabi Snyder
“Little Witch Hazel: A Year in the Forest” by Phoebe Wahl
“Over and Under the Canyon” by Kate Messner
“Peace Train” by Cat Stevens
“The First Blade of Sweetgrass: A Native American Story” by Suzanne Greenlaw and Gabriel Frey
“The Memory Box: A Book About Grief” by Joanna Rowland
“The Rhythm of the Rain” by Grahame Baker-Smith
“The Tree in Me” by Corinna Luyken
They, She, He, Me: Free to Be!” by Maya and Matthew Smith-Gonzalez
“Tomatoes for Neela” by Padma Lakshmi
“Tough Guys (Have Feelings Too)” by Keith Negley

JUVENILE BIOGRAPHY

“Chance: Escape from Holocaust” by Uri Shulevitz — “Though touching on many dark and serious topics, this story is totally focused on the fears, triumphs, and sensibilities of a child. It is truly a portrait of an artist as a young man thrust into a maelstrom of a world gone mad and relying on chance to decide his fate.” ―The Horn Book, starred review

JUVENILE FICTION

“365 Days to Alaska” by Cathy Carr — “Carr’s heartfelt debut features classic middle-school problems, like dodging mean kids, as well as Rigel’s vivid feelings of displacement and deep love for nature.”  ― Booklist

“Ara Shah and the End of Time” by Roshani Chokshi — “In her middle-grade debut, Chokshi spins a fantastical narrative that seamlessly intertwines Hindu cosmology and folklore, feminism, and witty dialogue for an uproarious novel for young readers. Chokshi comes into her own in this novel, reminding readers of the power of language and of stories.”―Kirkus (starred review)

“Barefoot Dreams of Petra Luna” by Alda P. Dobbs — “Historical fiction that is as relevant as ever…A timeless and timely tale of one girl’s journey to save her family and discover herself.” ― Kirkus Reviews

Eugenia Lincoln and the Unexpected Package” by Kate DiCamillo — “As in the earlier books, believable (if eccentric) personalities, sophisticated vocabulary, and polished prose make this an inviting title for emerging chapter- book readers. Fans of this series and the earlier Mercy Watson books will be amazed by Eugenia’s partial redemption and delight that the results are merely temporary.” —Booklist

Finding Junie Kim” by Ellen Oh — “She seamlessly provides insight into Korean history and culture for the unintroduced and captures the human condition during wartime through frank portrayals of Junie’s modern-day struggles…Oh’s powerful novel sheds light on the devastating effect racism can have, and tells a history often overlooked.” — School Library Journal (starred review)

“Healer of the Water Monster” by Brian Young — “The deeply grounded and original perspective of this story brings readers into both the worlds of Navajo blessing songs, rain songs, and traditional healing and everyday family relationships. Hands readers a meaningful new take on family love.” — Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“Kaleidoscope” by Brian Selznick — “Selznick and Serlin take the easy reader format to new creative heights….The sharp pacing and charming humor also make it an excellent read-aloud choice….as funny as it is elegant. This will be enjoyed equally by youngsters and their grown-ups.” — School Library Journal, starred review

“King and the Dragonflies” by Kacen Callender — “Callender masterfully balances resonant themes of grief, love, family, friendship, racism, sexuality, and coming-of-age…deeply affecting, memorable.”-The Horn Book, starred review

“Let’s Mooove!” by Courtney Sheinmel — “Travel around the United States of America with twins Finn and Molly in this new chapter book series that highlights a different state in each book! … We must be dreaming! That’s what twins Finn and Molly Parker think when they discover a camper in their driveway–and it talks! When the RV transports them to a cattle ranch in Colorado, the twins know something magical has happened. Then the camper disappears, leaving Finn and Molly to wonder . . . how are we going to get home?..” — ONIX annotations

“Long Lost” by Jacqueline West — “In a spooky middle grade love letter to libraries and the mystery genre, West crafts a spellbinding exploration of sisterhood. . . . Alternating a contemporary third-person narrative with the found book’s parallel telling, West draws readers into a supernaturally tinged dual story, simultaneously offering an authentic portrait of sibling angst.” — Publishers Weekly

“Paradise on Fire” by Jewell Parker Rhodes — “Placing biracial boyhood and the struggles of colorism at its center, the novel challenges readers to pursue their own self-definition.”―Kirkus

“Rez Dogs” by Joseph Bruchac — “Hidden throughout this moving novel in verse, old stories are discovered like buried treasures.”—Kirkus, starred review

“Set Me Free” by Ann Clare LeZotte — “Full of adventure and twists, and LeZotte never shies away from addressing racism, ableism, or sexism…the book’s themes resonate today, as Mary fights for the rights of all people and offers hope to readers facing challenges. A gripping tale of historical fiction.” — Booklist

The Beatryce Prophecy” by Kate DiCamillo — “The incomparable Kate DiCamillo offers a lovely fable of a girl, a monk and a goat, a tale that is a testament of the power of love (as so many of her books are) and the power of the written word to change the world for the better.” —The Buffalo News

“The Ickabog” by J. K. Rowlings — “Once upon a time there was a tiny kingdom called Cornucopia, as rich in happiness as it was in gold, and famous for its food. From the delicate cream cheeses of Kurdsburg to the Hopes-of-Heaven pastries of Chouxville, each was so delicious that people wept with joy as they ate them. But even in this happy kingdom, a monster lurks. Legend tells of a fearsome creature living far to the north in the Marshlands… the Ickabog. Some say it breathes fire, spits poison, and roars through the mist as it carries off wayward sheep and children alike. Some say it’s just a myth… And when that myth takes on a life of its own, casting a shadow over the kingdom, two children – best friends Bert and Daisy – embark on a great adventure to untangle the truth and find out where the real monster lies, bringing hope and happiness to Cornucopia once more.” — Publisher Annotation:

“The Last Fallen Star” by Graci Kim — “From a compelling and endearing supporting cast to the rich and tantalizing Korean cuisine explored in its pages, this pays homage to traditional Korean magic and mythos while infusing it with a contemporary story line and characters readers will fall in love with in an instant. Riley’s unmistakable voice and her relatable search for and exploration of her identity will connect with readers at their cores, offering a truly promising start to a fantastical series.”―Booklist (starred review)

“The Storm Runner” by Jennifer Cervantes — “J. C. Cervantes is about to take you on a trip you will never forget, through the darkest, strangest, and funniest twists and turns of Maya myth. You will meet the scariest gods you can imagine, the creepiest denizens of the Underworld, and the most amazing and unlikely heroes who have to save our world from being ripped apart.”―Rick Riordan

JUVENILE GRAPHIC NOVELS

“Draw a Comic!” by J. P. Coovert — “…With Maker Comics: Draw a Comic! you’ll learn to create and print your own comics books! Follow these simple steps to sketch out your story ideas and ink a comic page. Learn which art supplies are best for drawing comics—you can use a pen, a brush, or even a computer! With the help of photocopy machine, you can even self-publish your own comics and share them with your friends!” — Amazon.com

“History Smashers: The Titanic” by Kate Messner — “Critical, respectful, engaging: exemplary history for children.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Snapdragon” by Kat Leh — “Snapdragon invigorates a classic hero’s journey with magic and heart.”―The AV Club

“The Girl from the Sea” by Molly Knox Ostergag — “Fifteen-year-old Morgan has a secret: She can’t wait to escape the perfect little island where she lives. She’s desperate to finish high school and escape her sad divorced mom, her volatile little brother, and worst of all, her great group of friends…who don’t understand Morgan at all. Because really, Morgan’s biggest secret is that she has a lot of secrets, including the one about wanting to kiss another girl. Then one night, Morgan is saved from drowning by a mysterious girl named Keltie. The two become friends and suddenly life on the island doesn’t seem so stifling anymore.But Keltie has some secrets of her own. And as the girls start to fall in love, everything they’re each trying to hide will find its way to the surface…whether Morgan is ready or not.” — Publisher Annotation:

“The Golden Compass: The Graphic Novel” by Stephanie Melchior-Durand — “Now, in this graphic novel adaptation of The Golden Compass, the world of His Dark Materials is brought to visual life. The stunning full-color art will offer both new and returning readers a chance to experience the story of Lyra, an ordinary girl with an extraordinary role to play in the fates of multiple worlds, in an entirely fresh way. This volume collects the full journey of Lyra to the far north, her rescue of the kidnapped children at Bolvangar, her escape via hot-air balloon, and her crucial role in Lord Asriel s ambitions to build a bridge to another world.” — ONIX Annotations

“The Way of the Hive: A Honey Bee’s Story” by Jay Hosler — “Graphic novel fans, lovers of nonfiction, budding ecologists, and readers looking for their next great obsession will be buzzing around this title for years to come.” — Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“This Place: 150 Years Retold” by various authors — “Ambitious in scope and strong in execution, this collection succeeds in prompting readers to remember (or learn) Indigenous history “Elisa Gall The Horn Book Magazine

“Tom’s Midnight Garden: A Graphic Adaption of the Philippa Pearce Classic” by Edith — ““[Edith’s] fine-lined figures, sketchy shading, stylish shapes, and muted palette of natural tones balance a modern look with the old-fashioned story. Perfect for fans of time-travel adventures or fantasies with a  smidgen of historical fiction.” — Booklist

“Treasure in the Lake” by Jason Pamment — “This story is astonishing enough to leave people speechless.” — Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

JUVENILE NON-FICTION

“Design like Nature: Biomimicry for a Healthy Planet” by Megan Clendenan —
“The approachable text, supported by lots of captioned photos, spotlights some of nature’s more remarkable innovations and some engineering feats inspired by nature.” ― The Horn Book

“Mad for Ads: How Advertising Gets (and Stays) in Our Heads” by Erica Fyvie — “This upbeat, up-to-date look at advertising helps young readers understand just how insidious marketing can be.” ―Booklist

“Master of Disguise; Camouflaging Creatures & Magnificent Mimics” by Marc Martin — “Martin highlights the lives and disguises of one dozen animals hailing from habitats from every continent but Antarctica, with camouflaged-animal searches. Captivating watercolor art immediately draws you in. . . Both art and text enhance scientific accuracy with beauty and playfulness—a rare feat. Sturdy pages, too. Do not hide this book!”
Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“Our World Out of Balance: Understanding Climate Change and What We Can Do” by Andrea Minogloi — “A great starting place to understand climate change and its effects.” Booklist

“Out of the Blue: How Animals Evolved from Prehistoric Seas” by Elizabeth Shreeve — “This short book guides the reader from the beginnings of life eons ago through to the present day, beginning with an Earth devoid of life and following water-dwelling, single-celled creatures that develop and change as they move “out of the blue” and onto land. The text explains the adaptations that were necessary for animals to live out of the water, as well as how some animals survived (and how others didn’t) during the several extinction events that Earth has suffered.” —School Library Connection

Pearl Harbor” by Kate Messner — “Kate Messner serves up fun, fast history for kids who want the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth. Absolutely smashing!” —Candace Fleming, award-wining author

Pie for Breakfast: A Baking Book for Children” by Cynthia Cliff — “A beautifully illustrated baking book for children featuring recipes for delicious treats along with a powerful message about family, diversity, and helping others.” — Random House, Inc.

“Rescuing Titanic” by Flora Delargy — “This gorgeously illustrated tale of heroes and hope amid one of the most well-known marine tragedies of all time is a must buy for collections serving curious readers of all ages fascinated by the Titanic.”  ―Emily Beasley, Omaha Public Sch., NE, School Library Journal, starred review

Stamped (for Kids): Racism: Antiracism and You” by Sonja Cherry-Paul — “Readers who want to truly understand how deeply embedded racism is in the very fabric of the U.S., its history, and its systems will come away educated and enlightened. Worthy of inclusion in every home and in curricula and libraries everywhere. Impressive and much needed.”―Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“The American Revolution” by Keat Messner — “Critical, respectful, engaging: exemplary history for children.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“The Guide to Woodworking with Kids: Craft Projects to Develop the Lifelong Skills of Young Makers” by Doug Stowe –“… This comprehensive guide offers step by step instruction for teachers, parents and grandparents to offer safe woodworking opportunities to their students and kiddos as a way of developing a wide range of valuable life-skills. … The Guide to Woodworking with Kids is more than a woodworking book, it’s gives parents, grandparents and teachers the confidence, encouragement, and the insight needed to safely engage children in life-enhancing creative arts.” — ONIX annotations

The People Remember” by Ibi Aanu Zoboi — “This immaculately illustrated picture book walks through a vast swath of history… Zoboi’s poetic retrospective breathes life into Black history narratives and reverently celebrates Black lives.” — Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

YOUNG ADULT FICTION

“Call Me Athena: Girl from Detroit” by Colby Cedar Smith — “This story of an immigrant girl growing up in Detroit in the 1930s hits every mark. Woven into the story are her parents’ histories and all the love and loss the family has faced. It will tug your heartstrings.” — (American Booksellers Association)

“Defy the Night” by Brigid Kemmerer — “The slow-burn romance-between an idealist with straightforward moral beliefs and a pragmatist trapped by duty-will keep the pages turning, as will the scheming of the king’s consuls and the rebellion brewing in the background . . . . The personal and the political intertwine in this engaging series opener.” ―Kirkus Reviews

Lobizona” by Romina Garber — “In a timely work of magical realism featuring references to Borges and Garcia Márquez, Garber tackles issues of nationalism, identity, and belonging…This layered novel blends languages and cultures to create a narrative that celebrates perseverance.” – PUBLISHERS WEEKLY (Starred Review)

Me (Moth)” by Amber McBride — “This searing debut novel-in-verse is told from the perspective of Moth, a Black teen whose life changed forever the day a car crash killed her family. … Each free verse poem is tightly composed, leading into the next for a poignant and richly layered narrative. The story builds softly and subtly to a perfect, bittersweet ending. Fans of Jacqueline Woodson won’t be able to put this one down.”―School Library Journal, starred review

On the Come Up” by Angie Thomas — “With sharp, even piercing, characterization, this indelible and intricate story of a young girl who is brilliant and sometimes reckless, who is deeply loved and rightfully angry at a world that reduces her to less than her big dreams call her to be, provides many pathways for readers.” — Horn Book (starred review)

The Dead and the Dark” by Courtney Gould — “Gould’s supernaturally spooky debut is filled with all manner of creepy inventiveness…an intriguing read.” – Publishers Weekly

“The Last Legacy” by Adrienne Young — “In this sumptuously rendered historical novel, Young deftly explores concepts of family, loyalty, and growing into one’s destiny.” – Publishers Weekly

“The Dead and the Dark” by Courtney Gould — “Gould’s supernaturally spooky debut is filled with all manner of creepy inventiveness…an intriguing read.” – Publishers Weekly by Charlotte Nicole Davis

“The Wild Ones: A Broken Anthem for a Girl Nation” by Nafiza Azad — “A powerful feminist account of sisterhood, the longevity of pain, and the reclamation of power.” ― Kirkus Reviews

There Will Come a Darkness” by Katy Rose Pool — “[S]et apart by its immersive worldbuilding and compelling narrators.” ―Shelf Awareness, STARRED review

YOUNG ADULT NON-FICTION

I Will Always Write Back: How One Letter Changed Two Lives” by Caitlin Alifirenka — “The remarkable tenacity of these two souls pulled like magnets across the world by their opposite polarities – one committed to helping, the other to surviving – is deeply affecting…It’s quite a little miracle of unexpected genuineness.”―New York Times Book Review

YOUNG ADULT GRAPHIC NOVEL

A Girl Called Echo” by Katherena Vermette — “Henderson’s realistic art and perfect pacing, particularly in the pages of wordless panels depicting Echo’s daily routine, highlight her silent nature and hint at the source of her unspoken sadness. Solitary teens are likely to strongly identify with Echo and look forward to more of her adventures. ― Booklist

“Nubia: The Real One” by L. L. McKinney — “… with endearing and expressive art by Robyn Smith, comes a vital story for today about equality, identity, and kicking it with your squad.” — Amazon.com